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(KIRO-7 Seattle)   Snohomish County, Washington learns that legalizing marijuana doesn't necessarily change the fact that people will rip off dealers   (kiro7.com) divider line
    More: Fail, Snohomish County, Washington, Everett, Washington, Marijuana Club, High Society Marijuana Shop robbery, ARIA Charts, Community Transit, Mukilteo, Washington, Washington State Route 99  
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1825 clicks; posted to Main » on 01 Oct 2020 at 2:29 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



49 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-10-01 12:27:08 PM  
Big deal. Bookstores get ripped off too.
 
2020-10-01 2:30:31 PM  
images.amcnetworks.comView Full Size
 
2020-10-01 2:31:40 PM  
That surveillance video needs yackety sax soundtrack, IMHO.
 
2020-10-01 2:32:06 PM  
I worked at an entomological lab equipment manufacturing facility. It was robbed twice at gunpoint and burglarized once. #DecriminalizeOlfactometers
 
2020-10-01 2:33:09 PM  
High volume cash based business.  Almost like robbing a bank.
 
2020-10-01 2:33:34 PM  
Well it did change things...a lot.

In this example, the dealer would have had to resolve this issue, typically with violence, on their own. Now that it's legal, they can let the justice system bend the crooks over instead.
 
2020-10-01 2:33:46 PM  
Liquor stores have been getting robbed since prohibition repealed.  Probably before it was passed.  The time in between there was a war between bootleggers.
 
2020-10-01 2:36:05 PM  
All your bad examples are bad cause weed shops are a cash only business and I'm surprised they don't get hit more often
 
2020-10-01 2:36:48 PM  
This whole thread suddenly made whataboutism kewl again
 
2020-10-01 2:37:18 PM  
The dealers are ripping off the patients customers, so plus ca change, c'est la meme chose.


/woke up this morning
//got yourself a gun
 
2020-10-01 2:41:15 PM  
Snohomish County, the Florida of Washington state.
 
2020-10-01 2:41:58 PM  
Who knew narcotics cause crime? It was a complete mystery.
 
2020-10-01 2:44:40 PM  
It's a waste of law-enforcement resources to protect businesses I don't like.

~~ Subby
 
2020-10-01 2:44:54 PM  

mekkab: The dealers are ripping off the patients customers, so plus ca change, c'est la meme chose.


/woke up this morning
//got yourself a gun


Hmmm? Less than a $100 for an ounce of decent, lab tested weed? Doesn't seem a rip off to me.
 
2020-10-01 2:46:09 PM  

inner ted: All your bad examples are bad cause weed shops are a cash only business and I'm surprised they don't get hit more often


Is that an issue with the product being sold, or the laws surrounding its sale?  We all know it's the latter. If the laws was written so dispensaries could get banking services, people could use their debit card instead and they wouldn't be nearly as big of a target.
 
2020-10-01 2:46:24 PM  
They got caught didnt they? the system worked.
 
2020-10-01 2:48:10 PM  

abhorrent1: Who knew narcotics cause crime? It was a complete mystery.


7-Eleven stores get robbed so often because soft drinks and salty snacks cause crime! Pizza drivers get robbed because pizza causes crime! Hookers get robbed because sex causes crime! Hey, this game is more fun than I thought it would be.
 
2020-10-01 2:52:30 PM  

CordycepsInYourBrain: abhorrent1: Who knew narcotics cause crime? It was a complete mystery.

7-Eleven stores get robbed so often because soft drinks and salty snacks cause crime! Pizza drivers get robbed because pizza causes crime! Hookers get robbed because sex causes crime! Hey, this game is more fun than I thought it would be.


Banks get robbed because financial institutions cause crime.  Wait a minute ... maybe this isn't as farcical as I originally thought.
 
2020-10-01 2:55:15 PM  

inner ted: All your bad examples are bad cause weed shops are a cash only business and I'm surprised they don't get hit more often


lulz wut?
 
2020-10-01 3:06:40 PM  

Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: Big deal. Bookstores get ripped off too.


By robbers who point guns at clerks and demand books?  Really?

common sense is an oxymoron: It's a waste of law-enforcement resources to protect businesses I don't like that sell an unhealthful product that is easy to conceal and resell, and which is impossible to trace once it's on the street.

~~ Subby


FTFY.

/subby

NewWorldDan: High volume cash based business.  Almost like robbing a bank.


Read TFA.  The robbers stole weed, too.  And put it on the street immediately, I strongly suspect.

tuxq: Well it did change things...a lot.

In this example, the dealer would have had to resolve this issue, typically with violence, on their own. Now that it's legal, they can let the justice system bend the crooks over instead.


What's the same is that people are still stealing from weed dealers because their merchandise is so easy to conceal and resell.
 
2020-10-01 3:11:08 PM  

DeadGeek: Snohomish County, the Florida of Washington state.


Can confirm.

/moved to Everett from Seattle
//been to Florida
///My neighborhood in Silver Lake is quite nice however
 
2020-10-01 3:11:20 PM  

tirob: common sense is an oxymoron: It's a waste of law-enforcement resources to protect businesses I don't like that sell an unhealthful product that is easy to conceal and resell, and which is impossible to trace once it's on the street.

~~ Subby

FTFY.


Like bottles of booze or packs of cigarettes from liquor stores?

tirob: /subby


Shocking.
 
2020-10-01 3:16:06 PM  

tirob: Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: Big deal. Bookstores get ripped off too.

By robbers who point guns at clerks and demand books?  Really?

common sense is an oxymoron: It's a waste of law-enforcement resources to protect businesses I don't like that sell an unhealthful product that is easy to conceal and resell, and which is impossible to trace once it's on the street.

~~ Subby

FTFY.

/subby

NewWorldDan: High volume cash based business.  Almost like robbing a bank.

Read TFA.  The robbers stole weed, too.  And put it on the street immediately, I strongly suspect.

tuxq: Well it did change things...a lot.

In this example, the dealer would have had to resolve this issue, typically with violence, on their own. Now that it's legal, they can let the justice system bend the crooks over instead.

What's the same is that people are still stealing from weed dealers because their merchandise is so easy to conceal and resell.


So what if it's unhealthy?  I could go the grocery store and load up on booze and junk food, those will kill you as sure as anything.

It's not the governments job to regulate our health.
 
2020-10-01 3:29:49 PM  

tirob: Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: Big deal. Bookstores get ripped off too.

By robbers who point guns at clerks and demand books?  Really?


Liquor stores certainly do get robbed at gunpoint.  Maybe we should ban alcohol.

Oh wait, we tried that 100 years ago and it was an unmitigated disaster.

Seriously we fought the war on weed for almost as long and it didn't change a damn thing.  It didn't make weed any harder to get, it didn't stop anyone that wanted to from smoking it.  All it did was line the pockets of criminals with money that could have gone towards a legitimate business that paid taxes.
 
2020-10-01 3:33:54 PM  

common sense is an oxymoron: tirob: common sense is an oxymoron: It's a waste of law-enforcement resources to protect businesses I don't like that sell an unhealthful product that is easy to conceal and resell, and which is impossible to trace once it's on the street.

~~ Subby

FTFY.

Like bottles of booze or packs of cigarettes from liquor stores?


A little.  The difference is that any teenager can hide $500 worth of weed in a jacket pocket.  $500 worth of booze or cigs are much harder to conceal.

Neondistraction:

So what if it's unhealthy?

For the purposes of this discussion, it's not just that weed is unhealthy.  There are several other drawbacks to asking the police to protect commerce in the substance, too.  I mentioned several of them in the post you answered.
 
2020-10-01 3:42:34 PM  

tirob: common sense is an oxymoron: tirob: common sense is an oxymoron: It's a waste of law-enforcement resources to protect businesses I don't like that sell an unhealthful product that is easy to conceal and resell, and which is impossible to trace once it's on the street.

~~ Subby

FTFY.

Like bottles of booze or packs of cigarettes from liquor stores?

A little.  The difference is that any teenager can hide $500 worth of weed in a jacket pocket.  $500 worth of booze or cigs are much harder to conceal.

Neondistraction:

So what if it's unhealthy?

For the purposes of this discussion, it's not just that weed is unhealthy.  There are several other drawbacks to asking the police to protect commerce in the substance, too.  I mentioned several of them in the post you answered.


So it's better instead to ask the cops to keep chasing down street level dealers and individual users rather than have them offer the exact same protection they already offer banks, liquor stores, and gas stations?  Or deal with the aftermath that occurs when a dealer or customer gets ripped off and resorts to violence because there's no legal recourse for them?
 
2020-10-01 3:48:39 PM  

Neondistraction

Liquor stores certainly do get robbed at gunpoint.

They certainly do.  But because of its bulk, it's much more difficult to remove booze from the scene of a robbery than it is to remove weed from one.

The alleged perpetrators here were nineteen years old.  A nineteen year old kid driving around with a carful of booze would attract attention pronto.  One who was walking around with a trash bag full of weed would be much less likely to get noticed.  Which fact makes weed much more desirable to steal than booze is.

Neondistraction: Seriously we fought the war on weed for almost as long and it didn't change a damn thing. It didn't make weed any harder to get, it didn't stop anyone that wanted to from smoking it.


And now Washington is trying to protect commerce in weed with the power of the police.  And the result is that the kind of BS described in TFA is happening.  You may see an improvement here, but I don't.

Neondistraction: All it did was line the pockets of criminals with money that could have gone towards a legitimate business that paid taxes.


Looks to me as if at least some of the "legitimate businesses" you refer to are now contributing, willy-nilly, to lining the pockets of those same criminals.
 
2020-10-01 3:58:25 PM  

Neondistraction: tirob: common sense is an oxymoron: tirob: common sense is an oxymoron: It's a waste of law-enforcement resources to protect businesses I don't like that sell an unhealthful product that is easy to conceal and resell, and which is impossible to trace once it's on the street.

~~ Subby

FTFY.

Like bottles of booze or packs of cigarettes from liquor stores?

A little.  The difference is that any teenager can hide $500 worth of weed in a jacket pocket.  $500 worth of booze or cigs are much harder to conceal.

Neondistraction:

So what if it's unhealthy?

For the purposes of this discussion, it's not just that weed is unhealthy.  There are several other drawbacks to asking the police to protect commerce in the substance, too.  I mentioned several of them in the post you answered.

So it's better instead to ask the cops to keep chasing down street level dealers and individual users rather than have them offer the exact same protection they already offer banks, liquor stores, and gas stations?  Or deal with the aftermath that occurs when a dealer or customer gets ripped off and resorts to violence because there's no legal recourse for them?


No, based on stories like this one I'd say it's about the same, actually.

I think it's time for more creative thinking on this topic.  For starters, how about decriminalizing possession for use so that cops don't go after individual users?
 
2020-10-01 4:00:20 PM  

tirob: Neondistraction

Liquor stores certainly do get robbed at gunpoint.

They certainly do.  But because of its bulk, it's much more difficult to remove booze from the scene of a robbery than it is to remove weed from one.

The alleged perpetrators here were nineteen years old.  A nineteen year old kid driving around with a carful of booze would attract attention pronto.  One who was walking around with a trash bag full of weed would be much less likely to get noticed.  Which fact makes weed much more desirable to steal than booze is.

Neondistraction: Seriously we fought the war on weed for almost as long and it didn't change a damn thing. It didn't make weed any harder to get, it didn't stop anyone that wanted to from smoking it.

And now Washington is trying to protect commerce in weed with the power of the police.  And the result is that the kind of BS described in TFA is happening.  You may see an improvement here, but I don't.

Neondistraction: All it did was line the pockets of criminals with money that could have gone towards a legitimate business that paid taxes.

Looks to me as if at least some of the "legitimate businesses" you refer to are now contributing, willy-nilly, to lining the pockets of those same criminals.


You must be high. That's the only explanation for this nonsense.
 
2020-10-01 4:02:40 PM  

tirob: Neondistraction

Liquor stores certainly do get robbed at gunpoint.

They certainly do.  But because of its bulk, it's much more difficult to remove booze from the scene of a robbery than it is to remove weed from one.

The alleged perpetrators here were nineteen years old.  A nineteen year old kid driving around with a carful of booze would attract attention pronto.  One who was walking around with a trash bag full of weed would be much less likely to get noticed.  Which fact makes weed much more desirable to steal than booze is.

Neondistraction: Seriously we fought the war on weed for almost as long and it didn't change a damn thing. It didn't make weed any harder to get, it didn't stop anyone that wanted to from smoking it.

And now Washington is trying to protect commerce in weed with the power of the police.  And the result is that the kind of BS described in TFA is happening.  You may see an improvement here, but I don't.

Neondistraction: All it did was line the pockets of criminals with money that could have gone towards a legitimate business that paid taxes.

Looks to me as if at least some of the "legitimate businesses" you refer to are now contributing, willy-nilly, to lining the pockets of those same criminals.


So marijuana should still be illegal because it's too small and compact?  Too easy to conceal?

Ok, we better start outlawing pharmacies then. Because those pills are also very small and easy to conceal, and very likely worth more than their weight in marijuana.

Also, do you really think those 19 year olds wouldn't have just gone and robbed some other place if the dispensary weren't there?  They'd have robbed a liquor store or a gas station or any other place they saw as an easy target with a lot of cash on hand.  If they still wanted weed they could have then used their stolen cash to go buy as much as they want from their nearest drug dealer.
 
2020-10-01 4:10:08 PM  
One major reason for this is that due to federal laws, financial institutions are barred from allowing cannabis businesses to use their services. This means they deal as a cash only business. Criminals (the thieves, not the pot shops) know that there are large amounts of cash sitting around for the taking. Very similar to other cash heavy businesses, for example taxi drivers. If they allowed cannabis businesses to accept credit and debit cards, and put their money into banks, it wouldn't be such a desirable target for thieves. That said, at least now when criminals target a respectable pot shop, the police will investigate and being the crooks to justice.
 
2020-10-01 4:10:52 PM  

common sense is an oxymoron: It's a waste of law-enforcement resources to protect businesses I don't like.

~~ Subby


My dispensary in IL is 2 doors down from the massive regional state police HQ. 2 layers of security doors between any entrance and any cash/product. Armed guard on site but not conspicuous to be targeted. They thought things through.

Coincidentally, they voluntarily enacted strict mask/distance rules in early March before anyone made anything happen. I still feel safer going in there than I do anywhere else because I know the management is super serial about safety. When your bread and butter is medical patients you respect your customers and try to keep them safe.
 
2020-10-01 4:12:19 PM  

tirob: Neondistraction: tirob: common sense is an oxymoron: tirob: common sense is an oxymoron: It's a waste of law-enforcement resources to protect businesses I don't like that sell an unhealthful product that is easy to conceal and resell, and which is impossible to trace once it's on the street.

~~ Subby

FTFY.

Like bottles of booze or packs of cigarettes from liquor stores?

A little.  The difference is that any teenager can hide $500 worth of weed in a jacket pocket.  $500 worth of booze or cigs are much harder to conceal.

Neondistraction:

So what if it's unhealthy?

For the purposes of this discussion, it's not just that weed is unhealthy.  There are several other drawbacks to asking the police to protect commerce in the substance, too.  I mentioned several of them in the post you answered.

So it's better instead to ask the cops to keep chasing down street level dealers and individual users rather than have them offer the exact same protection they already offer banks, liquor stores, and gas stations?  Or deal with the aftermath that occurs when a dealer or customer gets ripped off and resorts to violence because there's no legal recourse for them?

No, based on stories like this one I'd say it's about the same, actually.

I think it's time for more creative thinking on this topic.  For starters, how about decriminalizing possession for use so that cops don't go after individual users?


So if it's the same amount of work for the cops either way then why not keep it legal?  At least this way the state is collecting taxes from the sales.

Decriminalization is a step in the right direction, and in a lot of places it already is in one way or another.  Hell in my city earlier this year the county prosecutor announced his office would no longer pursue charges for possession under an ounce.  But that keeps the black market going, which drives prices up and leads to other crimes, and leaves a foothold for the drug cartels to keep moving their weed.

People are going to keep buying it regardless, society would be better off if that money went to a source that paid taxes than to a drug cartel.
 
2020-10-01 4:12:56 PM  

Neondistraction: tirob: Neondistraction

Liquor stores certainly do get robbed at gunpoint.

They certainly do.  But because of its bulk, it's much more difficult to remove booze from the scene of a robbery than it is to remove weed from one.

The alleged perpetrators here were nineteen years old.  A nineteen year old kid driving around with a carful of booze would attract attention pronto.  One who was walking around with a trash bag full of weed would be much less likely to get noticed.  Which fact makes weed much more desirable to steal than booze is.

Neondistraction: Seriously we fought the war on weed for almost as long and it didn't change a damn thing. It didn't make weed any harder to get, it didn't stop anyone that wanted to from smoking it.

And now Washington is trying to protect commerce in weed with the power of the police.  And the result is that the kind of BS described in TFA is happening.  You may see an improvement here, but I don't.

Neondistraction: All it did was line the pockets of criminals with money that could have gone towards a legitimate business that paid taxes.

Looks to me as if at least some of the "legitimate businesses" you refer to are now contributing, willy-nilly, to lining the pockets of those same criminals.

So marijuana should still be illegal because it's too small and compact?  Too easy to conceal?

Ok, we better start outlawing pharmacies then. Because those pills are also very small and easy to conceal, and very likely worth more than their weight in marijuana.

Also, do you really think those 19 year olds wouldn't have just gone and robbed some other place if the dispensary weren't there?  They'd have robbed a liquor store or a gas station or any other place they saw as an easy target with a lot of cash on hand.  If they still wanted weed they could have then used their stolen cash to go buy as much as they want from their nearest drug dealer.


they would rob a taxi driver, who also has a great deal of cash sitting around. pot shops need to be allowed access to banking and this would be reduced.
 
2020-10-01 4:19:21 PM  
The dispensary I go to in NJ has multiple armed guards. I see at least three out front.
 
2020-10-01 4:37:13 PM  

tirob: common sense is an oxymoron: tirob: common sense is an oxymoron: It's a waste of law-enforcement resources to protect businesses I don't like that sell an unhealthful product that is easy to conceal and resell, and which is impossible to trace once it's on the street.

~~ Subby

FTFY.

Like bottles of booze or packs of cigarettes from liquor stores?

A little.  The difference is that any teenager can hide $500 worth of weed in a jacket pocket.  $500 worth of booze or cigs are much harder to conceal.


Wake me when you have a new argument. I'm also curious as to where you live, since it seems to be some sort of hellhole where cars with trunks are beyond the means of a teenage thief.
 
2020-10-01 4:46:31 PM  

Neondistraction: tirob: Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: Big deal. Bookstores get ripped off too.

By robbers who point guns at clerks and demand books?  Really?

Liquor stores certainly do get robbed at gunpoint.  Maybe we should ban alcohol.

Oh wait, we tried that 100 years ago and it was an unmitigated disaster.

Seriously we fought the war on weed for almost as long and it didn't change a damn thing.  It didn't make weed any harder to get, it didn't stop anyone that wanted to from smoking it.  All it did was line the pockets of criminals with money that could have gone towards a legitimate business that paid taxes.


Whatever would the too big to jail bankers pay money laundering fines for?  One can clearly see just how effectively the American Taxpayers were in prosecuting the War On Some Drugs when the spotlight was turned on those institutions during the Financial Crisis; from BOA constructing a second entrance to a branch in Mexico so the wife of the local cartel gunsel could transfer the duffel bags full of cash she'd brought to "deposit" without other customers becoming suspicious, to flying palettes of cash in cargo jets from Mexico to European bankers. Nearly every major bank ended up paying fines for laundering - rather than their execs locked up.

And, it hasn't stopped in a half-century of "enforcement".  The risk of getting caught, at any level of the "Game" remains stuck just where it was when NIxon kicked it off, i.e., 10%.  The other 90% continue to prosper (law enforcement?  Just enough of a 'Risk On' to clear the riff raff and the unlucky - more importantly helps keep the prices up/up).
 
2020-10-01 4:56:47 PM  

DeadGeek: Snohomish County, the Florida of Washington state.


Only because it's more populated than other derpier counties here.

Whatcom gets a (Dis)Honorable mention.
 
2020-10-01 6:05:22 PM  

Neondistraction: So marijuana should still be illegal because it's too small and compact? Too easy to conceal?


My argument is that it's bad policy to have the police protect commerce in it, and this partly--but by no means entirely--because it's too easy to steal, conceal and resell without leaving a trace.

I don't think the question is as cut and dried as whether "marijuana should still be illegal."  I think that what we should be asking is what kind of policy works.  And I don't think that what Washington is doing is working if TFA is any indication.

Neondistraction: Also, do you really think those 19 year olds wouldn't have just gone and robbed some other place if the dispensary weren't there?


I don't know.   They robbed the weed store though, at least according to the police.

It's not a "dispensary."  Dispensaries provide genuine medicine, and this often at no cost to their clients.

Neondistraction: They'd have robbed a liquor store or a gas station or any other place they saw as an easy target with a lot of cash on hand.


Maybe.  We don't know that.

Neondistraction: So if it's the same amount of work for the cops either way then why not keep it legal?


Because it isn't healthful to ingest, for starters.

Neondistraction: At least this way the state is collecting taxes from the sales.


And spending the proceeds on cops chasing down weed thieves, and on a laughably ineffective bureaucracy that's supposed to oversee the trade.

Neondistraction: Decriminalization is a step in the right direction, and in a lot of places it already is in one way or another. Hell in my city earlier this year the county prosecutor announced his office would no longer pursue charges for possession under an ounce. But that keeps the black market going, which drives prices up and leads to other crimes, and leaves a foothold for the drug cartels to keep moving their weed.


I concur with everything you write in this paragraph.  The problem is that the drug cartels you refer to aren't put out of business by legalization; far from it, in fact.

Here's a recent Fark thread about a tragedy where seven people were found shot to death on an illegal grow in California.

https://www.fark.com/comments/1094676​2​/So-Laotian-Mafia-None-of-this-story-m​akes-sense-Killing-seven-people-over-a​-weed-growing-operation-in-Riverside-C​ounty-seems-just-a-tad-excessive-Unles​s-of-course-Teh-Debil-Killer-Weed-made​-them-do-it

If legalization put drug cartels out of the weed business, I would support it for that reason alone.  It doesn't.

Neondistraction: People are going to keep buying it regardless, society would be better off if that money went to a source that paid taxes than to a drug cartel.


See above, especially the Fark thread that I linked.  It appears to me that under legalization, buyers' money is going to *both.*

common sense is an oxymoron:

Wake me when you have a new argument. I'm also curious as to where you live, since it seems to be some sort of hellhole where cars with trunks are beyond the means of a teenage thief.

As far as this topic is concerned, I couldn't budge you from your sleep even if I activated a smoke alarm next to your ear.

I live in Pennsylvania.  Where we've seen plenty of burglaries of weed stores, particularly during the riots that broke out after the George Floyd protests.  No car necessary.
 
2020-10-01 6:38:15 PM  

tirob: Neondistraction: So if it's the same amount of work for the cops either way then why not keep it legal?

Because it isn't healthful to ingest, for starters.


That is NOT a vaild argument.  Just because something is bad for you doesn't mean it should be illegal.  Fast food is bad for you.  But we have the choice to eat it.  Alcohol is really bad for you.  It can kill you quick or slow.  But as long we aren't driving or otherwise endangering others then we have the choice to drink it.  I could go one with dozens more - salt, sugar, cosmetic surgery.  Point is being bad for you is clearly not reason to ban something.

As for your comments about the cartels still running weed, yes of course they are still moving it.  First of all it's still illegal in most of the country so there are still plenty of market opportunities for them.  Nothing short of country-wide legalization would put them out of the weed business here.  Which brings me to my second point, even with full legalization everywhere it would take time for the black market to fade.  You think the bootleggers quit the day after they past the 21st amendment?  No it would take years.  And no it wouldn't get rid of the cartels, but it would take a good chunk of their income and that's not nothing.
 
2020-10-01 6:45:07 PM  

DeadGeek: Snohomish County, the Florida of Washington state.


Nah, Pierce County has them beat.  Mason County also gives Pierce a good run for its money too.
 
2020-10-01 7:27:30 PM  

Neondistraction: tirob: Neondistraction: So if it's the same amount of work for the cops either way then why not keep it legal?

Because it isn't healthful to ingest, for starters.

That is NOT a vaild argument


Not by itself, I concede, and for the reasons you say.  But weed is also unique among the substances you list in that it is, except for the cases where it is used for a bona fide medical purpose, supposed to be consumed until it messes you up.  That is, it is more like other scheduled substances in that respect than say, Big Macs are, or Twinkies are, or even whisky is; in this last case its drinkers are in theory (although not always in practice, of course) supposed to stop drinking before they get drunk.  And then there are the multiple difficulties of regulation and enforcement, many of which I have discussed here already.

Neondistraction: As for your comments about the cartels still running weed, yes of course they are still moving it. First of all it's still illegal in most of the country so there are still plenty of market opportunities for them.


If you go back to that Fark thread I cited you'll see that there are still plenty of market opportunities for the cartels in **legal at retail** states like California.  Where nearly three quarters of the local weed market was still in the hands of criminals as of the end of last year.

Neondistraction: Nothing short of country-wide legalization would put them out of the weed business here.


Country-wide legalization hasn't put the criminal element out of the weed business in Canada, not by a longshot.  In fact, the illegal dealers are doing so well there that they're hurting the legal producers.

https://www.theguardian.com/society/2​0​20/mar/18/cannabis-canada-legal-recrea​tional-business

I know of no evidence that things would be any different here.

Neondistraction: You think the bootleggers quit the day after they past the 21st amendment?


Dutch Schultz, who during Prohibition controlled the illegal beer trade in Manhattan and the Bronx, was put out of business the day of Repeal because he couldn't get a license to distribute.  He switched over to numbers and loansharking and was killed by rivals within two and a half years.  Repeal not only put Schultz out of the beer trade, it put him in the cemetery.  I don't see any of the Canadian illegal weed producers suffering Schultz's fate.

---

Just wanted to tip the topper to you for arguing forcefully while always staying on point.  I appreciate it.
 
2020-10-01 8:09:37 PM  

tirob: common sense is an oxymoron: Wake me when you have a new argument. I'm also curious as to where you live, since it seems to be some sort of hellhole where cars with trunks are beyond the means of a teenage thief.

As far as this topic is concerned, I couldn't budge you from your sleep even if I activated a smoke alarm next to your ear.

I live in Pennsylvania.  Where we've seen plenty of burglaries of weed stores, particularly during the riots that broke out after the George Floyd protests.  No car necessary.


Taking missing the point to an art form hitherto seen only in soccer flops.
 
2020-10-01 8:35:01 PM  
Dope heads....lol
 
2020-10-01 8:35:24 PM  
Big difference is now they can report crime to the cops, and not get laughed at.
 
2020-10-01 9:57:18 PM  

Visual Howlaround Title Sequence: Big deal. Bookstores get ripped off too.


Except bookstores have bank accounts and can take credit cards. This hazard is a direct result of the banking laws. Too much cash on hand.
 
2020-10-01 11:10:52 PM  

sizzurpingDerp: One major reason for this is that due to federal laws, financial institutions are barred from allowing cannabis businesses to use their services. This means they deal as a cash only business. Criminals (the thieves, not the pot shops) know that there are large amounts of cash sitting around for the taking. Very similar to other cash heavy businesses, for example taxi drivers. If they allowed cannabis businesses to accept credit and debit cards, and put their money into banks, it wouldn't be such a desirable target for thieves. That said, at least now when criminals target a respectable pot shop, the police will investigate and being the crooks to justice.


Nailed it.

If one could use credit cards at weed stores they'd be like every other store.

It's the federal prohibition that's causing this. Hopefully if Biden is elected we can remedy this.
 
2020-10-01 11:11:23 PM  

whidbey: DeadGeek: Snohomish County, the Florida of Washington state.

Only because it's more populated than other derpier counties here.

Whatcom gets a (Dis)Honorable mention.


Username checks out. No man is an island, but this username is.
 
2020-10-01 11:14:54 PM  

DiffMavis: whidbey: DeadGeek: Snohomish County, the Florida of Washington state.

Only because it's more populated than other derpier counties here.

Whatcom gets a (Dis)Honorable mention.

Username checks out. No man is an island, but this username is.


I've never met Whidbey the Fark poster but Whidbey Island I can confirm is absolutely magnificent.
 
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