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(YouTube) Video We lost the legendary Miles Davis on this day in 1991. Relive his genius from this clip live from Copenhagen in 1969   (youtube.com) divider line
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312 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 28 Sep 2020 at 2:05 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-09-28 1:22:06 PM  
Nice.
 
2020-09-28 1:35:57 PM  
Great stuff.  Great music, but that vest?  Miles Davis could make pissing in your pants cool, but even *he* can't pull off that vest.

But seriously, really great.  Thanks, subby
 
2020-09-28 2:13:27 PM  
Miles Davis - My very funny Valentine SHREDS
Youtube j5ZsKqAUA2Q
 
2020-09-28 2:15:46 PM  
Miles Davis - Boplicity
Youtube HLzqjmoZZAc
 
2020-09-28 2:18:30 PM  

Naido: Great stuff.  Great music, but that vest?  Miles Davis could make pissing in your pants cool, but even *he* can't pull off that vest.

But seriously, really great.  Thanks, subby


"It was a different time..."
 
2020-09-28 2:19:27 PM  
nick nack no
Youtube hCpxCFzwLQw

RIP Piles
 
2020-09-28 2:22:52 PM  
Have you tried looking in the cushions of the couch?   I lose stuff there all the time.  My keys, pocket knife, TV remote, treasures, civilizations, etc.
 
2020-09-28 2:26:48 PM  
One of my favorite artists of all time, one who has music to fit many moods, and one who introduced me to a wealth of new sounds.

Like so many before me, my introduction came through Kind of Blue. Also like many before me, that album became a springboard of discovery, leading me to Coltrane, Evans, "Cannonball" Adderley, and others. With that record as a starting point, it's like the center of a huge web that can lead you to dozens of fantastic records.

As for Miles himself, his career is just extraordinary. Aside from his questionable '80s material, there isn't an era that doesn't have something to offer.

His hard bop with Charlie Parker. The incredible "cool" period with John Coltrane, the experimental early to mid '60s with his second great quintet, the orchestral works for Gil Evans (Sketches of Spain is GORGEOUS and is an all-time favorite), the beautiful peace of In A Silent Way and hazy fog of Biatches Brew, and yes, even the rock-infused meandering funk of his challenging '70s work, which isn't for everyone but which grows on you when you give it a chance.

The dude just never stopped trying new things and never stopped innovating. He was tireless. Restless. He just created and created and created, and if he dropped the ball with one idea you could be sure he'd scoop it up again with his next.

Miles Davis legitimately changed my music-listening life forever. Think I picked up Kind of Blue around 1998 or 1999. My listening habits have never been the same since.
 
2020-09-28 2:42:12 PM  
Miles Davis had an intermittent relationship with French singer Juliet Greco, who died recently. He said that he never asked her in marriage, because an interracial relationship in the USA would have been hell for her (France is not without its numerous faults, but like most of Europe, racism there was far less vicious than the USA).
She once spat on the maître d' of a New York restaurant because of the way they treated them
 
2020-09-28 2:43:18 PM  
I'm sure I'll be posting clips later on but first: the more things change the more they stay the same.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-09-28 2:48:11 PM  

shoegaze99: Think I picked up Kind of Blue around 1998 or 1999. My listening habits have never been the same since.


same here;  late 90s when I got into a jazz kick.  i'm a dilletante (sp?) ; I have KOB, Sketches of Spain, Coltrane's ALS (and compilation or two), some Carla Bley and a Stan Getz here or there.  I'm no jazz aficionado by any measure but....KOB.  I know every millisecond of it.  it's pure farking genius.

And interesting trivia;  he fell in love with Cindi Lauper's "Time After Time", such that he performed it if not every night, a shiatload.  who woulda thunk it.  Just google "Miles Davis Time After Time";  you'll see probably 50 different versions online.


Miles Davis - Time After Time (Live 1985)
Youtube rE8y7QAJ3ug


(now, can you recognize it?  you decide.  But this was his take on it.)
 
2020-09-28 2:54:37 PM  

rickythepenguin: (now, can you recognize it?  you decide.  But this was his take on it.)


oh, forgot.  David Crosby tells the same story of his slash CSN's "Guinivere".  Says in the 70s or 80s, he ran into Davis in NYC and Miles - in the telling, Croz adopts a pretty remarkable Miles' impression, re the smoky voice - "yo, Croz, you wanna come to my place and here my version of 'Guinivere'?"  Croz is like, "do I want to hang out with Miles Davis?  well DUHHHH!"

Croz says they go to his apartment and smoke up, then Miles with great fanfare puts on the record.   Croz just sits there and the song ends.  Miles is like, "whadja think?"

croz says, "i said I liked it a lot.  But, in fact, I didn't recognize a single note.  I guess I'm glad I get royalties from it, but, Miles should have just called it something else adn kept all the money!  But if he calls it 'his version' of 'Guinivere', that's his business!"

hilarious.
 
2020-09-28 3:04:55 PM  

rickythepenguin: I'm no jazz aficionado by any measure but....KOB.  I know every millisecond of it.  it's pure farking genius.


It really is. It's a rare perfect record. Legitimately perfect.

One of the ways it changed my listening is that it changed my need for density in music. I mean that in the sonic sense. I like thick walls of sound (as my handle might suggest), dense guitar, lots of textures, just an assault of sound. A song wasn't a collection of elements, it was one big sound.

And here comes this record into my life where its greatest asset is the SPACE on the record. Those spaces between the notes. The sparseness of it. It seems so effortless.

That reset my music brain and I started being better able to break down music to its component parts, to better see how all those individual elements add up to make something work. Completely changed how I see and hear music.

I STILL love dense walls of sound. Still listen to tons of stuff like that. And my own music combines my shoegaze influence with noise, post-rock, and lots of Brian Eno.

But I hear that sort of thing in a different way now thanks to Miles Davis and Kind of Blue.
 
2020-09-28 3:06:50 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

Stewart Lee - Jazz Comedian
Youtube 6MPYbPYak6U
 
2020-09-28 3:18:57 PM  
shoegaze99:

It's a rare perfect record. Legitimately perfect.

I feel the same about KOB I also feel this way about Cannonball Adderley's Somethin' Else, which I got to just before KOB when I started exploring jazz (mid-90s, when I was around 20).

Those albums are the standard:  if you don't enjoy anything about those albums, then you probably won't find anything to like in jazz.  Which is fine!  But if you're exploring, they're the best way to find out if you should *continue* exploring
 
2020-09-28 3:20:34 PM  
Stewart Lee on the Formula of Jokes (Content Provider)
Youtube PeV8GVsujKo
 
2020-09-28 3:23:06 PM  

shoegaze99: And my own music combines my shoegaze influence with noise, post-rock, and lots of Brian Eno.


"Shoegaze" never really did it for me but I like some of it.

Are you familiar with Brad Laner's "Medicine"?    it's often lumped with Shoegaze.  1993's "The Buried Life" still sounds current.  Laner has released music under his name and "Medicine", most recently I think 2016.  If you haven't, looked them/him up.  THey never got "popular", but were popular enough to be on the "The Crow" soundtrack (and briefly appear in the movie, if I'm not mistaken.)

But yeah, KOB is just 100% genius.  I prefer listening to it on rainy, cold, dreary days (which are few and far between in Arizona) but every now and then I put it on.  it's just gorgeous.

"Flamenco Sketches".  I think Coltrane takes the first solo, the other guy the second, and then Miles the last.  It's just gorgeous stuff.

Know what I'm listening to tonight!
 
2020-09-28 3:50:05 PM  

rickythepenguin: Are you familiar with Brad Laner's "Medicine"?


Oh, absolutely. A favorite of mine. He got a wild, overdriven distortion sound by running his guitar through a four-track and jacking the settings all the way up, effectively using it like a pedal. Such a nasty, crackling, ugly sound.

Though Her Highness is his least harsh record and is also my favorite from him. He really amped up the layered harmonies in a nice way.

He also briefly had a project called Amnesia that was similar, but with more electronic elements. Also dug that.

rickythepenguin: Know what I'm listening to tonight!


It's one of my go-to morning records. I work from home, and when I want something peaceful to ease me into my day it's one of several Miles records (KoB, Sketches of Spain, or In A Silent Way), maybe some Eno or Laraaji, one of Bill Evans' solo records (I love Conversations With Myself), or maybe some Stars of the Lid or Windy & Carl.

One or two of those records and then it's off to the races.

I'll sometimes end my day with Miles, too, but one of his upbeat records with Prestige or if I'm feeling saucy, one of those '70s records like Live-Evil, On The Corner or Jack Johnson.

The latter are, admittedly, an acquired taste. They used to be dismissed by most fans, but they seem to be getting a well-deserved reconsideration in recent years.
 
2020-09-28 3:55:55 PM  

AliceBToklasLives: I'm sure I'll be posting clips later on but first: the more things change the more they stay the same.

[Fark user image 850x735]


They demanded he show his ID and answer why he was there -- as he stood under a marquee saying "MILES DAVIS IN CONCERT", directly in front of a large poster with his picture on it.
 
2020-09-28 4:13:56 PM  

shoegaze99: I work from home, and when I want something peaceful to ease me into my day it's one of several Miles records (KoB, Sketches of Spain, or In A Silent Way),


yeah, when I'm at work and need some trance music, KOB is a go-to.  and sometimes just because.


shoegaze99: Oh, absolutely. A favorite of mine. He got a wild, overdriven distortion sound by running his guitar through a four-track and jacking the settings all the way up, effectively using it like a pedal. Such a nasty, crackling, ugly sound.


that's so cool that you know him / them.  I became aware of them when they opened for the Pumpkins in 1993 at the Warfield Theatre.  My pals and I were in the cheap seats, probably 5-8 rows from the rear of the venue in the balcony.  from that distance, Brad's volume was crushing.  "The Buried Life" had just come out and they opened with "The Pink".  I was hooked.

Special Delivery with The Captain and Tennille 1979
Youtube VfAIbAWMkSg


and check this out - 11yr old Brad "jamming" with, wait for it, Captain and Tenille! I dimly - and I mean dimlythis show, "Kids Are People Too".  they'd have late 70s/early 80s (but at the time, comtemporaneous entertainment stars) on and talented kids - jugglers, acrobats, musicians, whatever,a nd while I don't recall this specific episode, i found this when researching Laner years ago.

also, some years ago, we had a thread about "what is a great 90s album no one's ever heard of?"  i posted The Buried Life and was quite pleased - as I am now - that someone not just knew of the album, but had some specific connection to the band.  it's been so many years I don't recall, but it was something like, was their van driver on a tour, or did security for them at a show, or helped out on a recording session, some "specific" connection.
 
2020-09-28 4:27:44 PM  

rickythepenguin: and check this out - 11yr old Brad "jamming" with, wait for it, Captain and Tenille! I dimly - and I mean dimlythis show, "Kids Are People Too".  they'd have late 70s/early 80s (but at the time, comtemporaneous entertainment stars) on and talented kids - jugglers, acrobats, musicians, whatever,a nd while I don't recall this specific episode, i found this when researching Laner years ago.


Whoa! That's pretty awesome. I've never seen or heard of that.

Also awesome that you saw them open for the Pumpkins. That's a pretty fantastic 1-2 lineup. I really liked Pumpkins of that era (though they could be hit or miss live), so I'd probably have loved that show.

I was about to tell you that the show is up on the Internet Archive in case you wanted to download it and relive the memories, but when I went to grab the link for you I saw that you know already! Haha!!

The Internet is a smaller place than we realize.

I think I have a Medicine cassette or two in storage from my tape trading days, but it's been so long since I cracked the boxes open I may be mistaken. I know I have a bunch of Pumpkins, though, and believe it or not, I've got a Miles Davis show on cassette, too. Think it's from '67?
 
2020-09-28 4:34:12 PM  
...two masters of freedom playing at a time before their art was corrupted by a zillion cocktail lounge performers who destroyed the legacy of the only American art form... Jazz...

...I'm sorry, I'm going to need a moment here...

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-09-28 4:47:20 PM  

Rock Krenn: ...two masters of freedom playing at a time before their art was corrupted by a zillion cocktail lounge performers who destroyed the legacy of the only American art form... Jazz...



Leave Sinatra alone!
 
2020-09-28 5:02:58 PM  
70s Miles had some nice releases with Mike Stern and/or John Scofield.

We Want Miles comes to mind.
 
2020-09-28 5:04:10 PM  

shoegaze99: I saw that you know already! Haha!!


*wink*

Yup.  I was amazed when it showed up.  and yeah the SPs were a fairly shiat band live, and I say that as someone who, pardon the pun, Adores the first 3-4 albums.  Saw them....5-6 times, original lineup i think 4-5 times, then in 2000 D'Arcy left and they had a new bassist, and then saw them about a year or so ago with Jack.....Wilson, on bass.  (His dad is Peter Hook but he has a different surname.)  Billy, introducing the band:  "this is the 2nd or 3rd time The Smashing Pumpkins have played this venue, but, our bassist, Jack ___'s first.  But.His dad played here in 1988 with a little band called "New Order".  Son of Peter Hook, Jack ____ on bass!"  I knew, most didn't, the place went nuts.


Rock Krenn: ...I'm sorry, I'm going to need a moment here...


Jay Mohr tells the story of how he auditioned for that guy's part.  Got the role.  on a lark, the producer and director were like, "uh.....we already cast [Luke or Owen, i can't remember] Wilson as the antagonist (Bob Sugar), but....just for fun...would you mind reading for Bob Sugar?"

Jay is like, "ok, but, I haven't seen his lines or the part. I'll do it, but, give me a fair chance, let me see his lines and come back tomorrow.  I can't audition for a part I know nothing of."  they agree.

Jay goes home, memorizes the lines, goes back, and destroys the audition as "Bob Sugar".  producer and director (Cameron Crowe?) are like, ".........uhhh.........we'll get back to you."

hours later Jay's agent calls him:  "congratulations, you just farked up Hollywood.  They had ___ Wilson under contract for Bob Sugar, but, they want you now.  What's your price?  They're working on getting out of Wilson's contract.  His agent is furious!  You are 'Bob Sugar', say bye-bye to the ambiguously gay jazz loving nanny part.  You just created a huge, huge problem, and I love it!"
 
2020-09-28 5:11:34 PM  
I read his autobiography some time back.  I had to skip the early '50s heroin/pimping chapters as too depressing.  I hadn't known that in the '70s he was paired with rock acts by Bill Graham.  He admitted respect for some of the musicians but considered one popular rocker of the moment a 'No talent, can't play motherfarker'.  I agreed.
 
2020-09-28 5:14:49 PM  

dereksmalls: 70s Miles had some nice releases with Mike Stern and/or John Scofield.

We Want Miles comes to mind.


Those are early 80s. And there some of his best late work.

Got a chance to see Mike Stern live years ago and he just blew the roof off the place. One of best concerts I've ever seen (and far better than his studio albums).
 
2020-09-28 5:15:17 PM  
Don't forget the alcohol.
 
2020-09-28 5:16:38 PM  
thumbs.gfycat.comView Full Size
 
2020-09-28 5:23:12 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


SoberCannibal: I hadn't known that in the '70s he was paired with rock acts by Bill Graham.



Yup. Graham liked to bill (pardon the pun) "diverse" acts; he'd have a female singer/songwriter open for Cream, Blue Cheer open for Tim Buckley, etc. it is said half the fun of going to a Bill Graham production / Fillmore East or West, was, you never knew what you were gonna get.

April 1970 Miles opened for the Dead. Story goes GD bassist Phil Lesh - the only "trained" musician in the group - was disgusted Miles was opening. "We should be opening for HIM, man! This is farked up! This is BULLshiat, man!"
 
2020-09-28 5:26:53 PM  

Naido: shoegaze99:

It's a rare perfect record. Legitimately perfect.

I feel the same about KOB I also feel this way about Cannonball Adderley's Somethin' Else, which I got to just before KOB when I started exploring jazz (mid-90s, when I was around 20).

Those albums are the standard:  if you don't enjoy anything about those albums, then you probably won't find anything to like in jazz.  Which is fine!  But if you're exploring, they're the best way to find out if you should *continue* exploring


I would add "Time Out" to the list of mandatory jazz albums.
 
2020-09-28 5:36:54 PM  
Back in the late '80s I made a bunch of props and swag for the Prince Lovesexy tour.  Among other things I made a prop cane that was filled with oil and glitter, ultimately about 110 of them.   After a bit I was asked to make one more for Miles Davis.  That was a thrill.  I liked Prince, I loved Miles Davis.
 
2020-09-28 5:43:09 PM  

SoberCannibal: Back in the late '80s I made a bunch of props and swag for the Prince Lovesexy tour.  Among other things I made a prop cane that was filled with oil and glitter, ultimately about 110 of them.   After a bit I was asked to make one more for Miles Davis.  That was a thrill.  I liked Prince, I loved Miles Davis.


no farking way!

lovesexy is pretty genius.  everytime I go to the local reseller I look for a copy -  the original CD - and it's never there.  (and funny how Prince issued it as one track, on CD at least.  You'd put it in your stereo and the stereo took a minute to "digest", so to speak, the document.  a 10-12, 14 track CD would load up in seconds.  Not Lovesexy.

"Track 1:  59:43"

(or whatever it was.)

I downloaded "Glam Slam" from iTunes and it was edited down to like, 3:18 or some shiat.  NOT the original version!
 
2020-09-28 8:01:17 PM  
He Loved Him Madly
Youtube 3Fc_-VZlkcM


Brain Eno has been mentioned in this thread and he says "He Loved Him Madly," was a significant influence on his own ambient music. Also it's quite fun to listen to while stoned. .
 
2020-09-28 9:01:02 PM  
Really? I love his music, but didn't get into it until I was in high school in 1993. From what little I know about his personal life, I would've assumed he died of an OD much earlier.
 
2020-09-28 9:09:31 PM  
What was he doing sellin' scooters?
What was he doin' sellin' scooters?
He needed the cash!
He needed the cash!
His new record's trashia
the guy can't blow!!!!
 
2020-09-29 12:16:01 AM  
shoegaze99:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=y6b8s​g​WlIiY

listening to this; minute 17 Laner specifically namechecks "Shoegaze".  Listening to it now.
 
2020-09-29 2:17:32 PM  

AliceBToklasLives: dereksmalls: 70s Miles had some nice releases with Mike Stern and/or John Scofield.

We Want Miles comes to mind.

Those are early 80s. And there some of his best late work.

Got a chance to see Mike Stern live years ago and he just blew the roof off the place. One of best concerts I've ever seen (and far better than his studio albums).


Mixed up his 70s comeback with his 80s comeback.  "Betty; They Say I'm Different" , is a documentary about Betty Davis, Miles' wife. She  turned him on to Hendrix, John McLaughlin, etc. and helped change his  musical direction towards fusion i.e. biatches Brew
 
2020-09-29 3:30:53 PM  

dereksmalls: AliceBToklasLives: dereksmalls: 70s Miles had some nice releases with Mike Stern and/or John Scofield.

We Want Miles comes to mind.

Those are early 80s. And there some of his best late work.

Got a chance to see Mike Stern live years ago and he just blew the roof off the place. One of best concerts I've ever seen (and far better than his studio albums).

Mixed up his 70s comeback with his 80s comeback.  "Betty; They Say I'm Different" , is a documentary about Betty Davis, Miles' wife. She  turned him on to Hendrix, John McLaughlin, etc. and helped change his  musical direction towards fusion i.e. biatches Brew


Oooh, I gotta find that! Thanks!
 
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