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(ZDNet)   Android apps caught engaging in WAP billing fraud. Megan Thee Stallion unavailable for comment   (zdnet.com) divider line
    More: Asinine, Dropper, Malware, Joker venom, World Wide Web, Computer insecurity, Google, Spyware, Christopher Nolan  
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773 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 27 Sep 2020 at 11:30 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



33 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-09-27 10:18:01 PM  
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Does not approve
 
2020-09-27 11:52:47 PM  
Another week, another round of malware apps that I can't believe anyone would be stupid enough to install.
 
2020-09-28 12:02:04 AM  
Megan Thee Stallion is a rapper.....I must need to catch up with today's music.
 
2020-09-28 12:08:17 AM  
Cardi B - WAP ft. Megan Thee Stallion (Cover by Margot Price) (Emotional)
Youtube Ahfbyl1bsag
 
2020-09-28 12:43:44 AM  

Herr Flick's Revenge: Another week, another round of malware apps that I can't believe anyone would be stupid enough to install.


Basics, yes.
 
2020-09-28 1:23:09 AM  

Herr Flick's Revenge: Another week, another round of malware apps that I can't believe anyone would be stupid enough to install.


I can't believe people are still trying to blame the victim for Google's inability to keep malware out of the Play Store.
 
2020-09-28 2:46:37 AM  

BullBearMS: Herr Flick's Revenge: Another week, another round of malware apps that I can't believe anyone would be stupid enough to install.

I can't believe people are still trying to blame the victim for Google's inability to keep malware out of the Play Store.


You are responsible for your security.
Expecting everyone else to do it for you is stupid.
Don't download sketchy apps from unknown developers.
 
2020-09-28 4:24:59 AM  

Herr Flick's Revenge: BullBearMS: Herr Flick's Revenge: Another week, another round of malware apps that I can't believe anyone would be stupid enough to install.

I can't believe people are still trying to blame the victim for Google's inability to keep malware out of the Play Store.

You are responsible for your security.
Expecting everyone else to do it for you is stupid.
Don't download sketchy apps from unknown developers.


it's in the App Store. They are supposed to be vetted by Google.
 
2020-09-28 7:20:56 AM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Herr Flick's Revenge: BullBearMS: Herr Flick's Revenge: Another week, another round of malware apps that I can't believe anyone would be stupid enough to install.

I can't believe people are still trying to blame the victim for Google's inability to keep malware out of the Play Store.

You are responsible for your security.
Expecting everyone else to do it for you is stupid.
Don't download sketchy apps from unknown developers.

it's in the App Store. They are supposed to be vetted by Google.


They are vetted by Google.
 
2020-09-28 9:40:37 AM  

kdawg7736: Megan Thee Stallion is a rapper.....I must need to catch up with today's music.


You're not missing much.  Although Captain Hook was a fun track.
 
2020-09-28 10:10:08 AM  

Mad_Radhu: [YouTube video: Cardi B - WAP ft. Megan Thee Stallion (Cover by Margot Price) (Emotional)]


Best cover in the history of music.
 
2020-09-28 11:39:44 AM  

Herr Flick's Revenge: BullBearMS: Herr Flick's Revenge: Another week, another round of malware apps that I can't believe anyone would be stupid enough to install.

I can't believe people are still trying to blame the victim for Google's inability to keep malware out of the Play Store.

You are responsible for your security.
Expecting everyone else to do it for you is stupid.
Don't download sketchy apps from unknown developers.


Dont try. You will never overcome the power Bear gets from his +5000 Google Hate Boner. It makes him immune to all logic and facts that dont fit his world view of google bad, apple god
 
2020-09-28 2:02:41 PM  

lifeslammer: Herr Flick's Revenge: BullBearMS: Herr Flick's Revenge: Another week, another round of malware apps that I can't believe anyone would be stupid enough to install.

I can't believe people are still trying to blame the victim for Google's inability to keep malware out of the Play Store.

You are responsible for your security.
Expecting everyone else to do it for you is stupid.
Don't download sketchy apps from unknown developers.

Dont try. You will never overcome the power Bear gets from his +5000 Google Hate Boner. It makes him immune to all logic and facts that dont fit his world view of google bad, apple god


You still need to seek help.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-09-28 2:04:44 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: They are vetted by Google.


Then Google is incompetent at vetting apps, with the discovery of more malware in the Play Store being a weekly event.
 
2020-09-28 2:48:21 PM  

BullBearMS: Ketchuponsteak: They are vetted by Google.

Then Google is incompetent at vetting apps, with the discovery of more malware in the Play Store being a weekly event.


https://techcrunch.com/2020/08/31/app​l​e-notarized-mac-malware/

https://www.tomsguide.com/news/iphone​-​apps-infected-malware
That seems a bigger deal than apple accidentally giving malware a green light (though not as amusing).

No storefront provider is 'safe', though they all try to be.
In the end it's no different than using a computer, don't download and install unknown software, regardless of your OS.

Keeping a machine/phone malware/virus free is a three fold act of responsibility. One from the OS developer, one from the program/app developer, and one from the end user.

But you know all that, and we know you do. We also know you've got a narrative to spin though, so don't let any of the above stop you from that.
 
2020-09-28 2:48:36 PM  

BullBearMS: Ketchuponsteak: They are vetted by Google.

Then Google is incompetent at vetting apps, with the discovery of more malware in the Play Store being a weekly event.


I am surprised why the same malware doesn't exist on iPhone. Are apps that locked down on iPhone, that they can't update themselves?
 
2020-09-28 3:48:12 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: BullBearMS: Ketchuponsteak: They are vetted by Google.

Then Google is incompetent at vetting apps, with the discovery of more malware in the Play Store being a weekly event.

I am surprised why the same malware doesn't exist on iPhone. Are apps that locked down on iPhone, that they can't update themselves?


Apple designed security into the system from the start.  Apps have always lacked the ability to write to the entire filesystem, for example.  So when you delete the app, you know it's completely gone

That's why something like this unremovable malware on Android is impossible:

Security experts have identified a particularly stubborn strain of Android malware that somehow manages to reinstall it on a victim's device, even after they've performed a full factory reset.

Google chose to allow apps to do anything, which means malware can do anything.  They have recently admitted this was the wrong choice and started to implement the same sorts of controls iOS has had from the start, but it's a bit late to do that without breaking changes in existing apps.
 
2020-09-28 3:49:41 PM  

envirovore: No storefront provider is 'safe', though they all try to be.


All storefront providers are not so insecure that you start blaming users for not vetting apps that they install from inside the app store.
 
2020-09-28 4:04:13 PM  

BullBearMS: Ketchuponsteak: BullBearMS: Ketchuponsteak: They are vetted by Google.

Then Google is incompetent at vetting apps, with the discovery of more malware in the Play Store being a weekly event.

I am surprised why the same malware doesn't exist on iPhone. Are apps that locked down on iPhone, that they can't update themselves?

Apple designed security into the system from the start.  Apps have always lacked the ability to write to the entire filesystem, for example.  So when you delete the app, you know it's completely gone

That's why something like this unremovable malware on Android is impossible:

Security experts have identified a particularly stubborn strain of Android malware that somehow manages to reinstall it on a victim's device, even after they've performed a full factory reset.

Google chose to allow apps to do anything, which means malware can do anything.  They have recently admitted this was the wrong choice and started to implement the same sorts of controls iOS has had from the start, but it's a bit late to do that without breaking changes in existing apps.


Well yes, aps should be able to do anything. I am happy that they are.

But, can, or can't apps on iPhone update themselves?
 
2020-09-28 4:20:32 PM  

BullBearMS: envirovore: No storefront provider is 'safe', though they all try to be.

All storefront providers are not so insecure that you start blaming users for not vetting apps that they install from inside the app store.


Which store front providers are secure enough that users should feel safe enough to download any unknown app without worry then?

It's not Google or Apple as evidenced by tfa and my above comment.
 
2020-09-28 4:34:03 PM  

envirovore: Which store front providers are secure enough that users should feel safe enough to download any unknown app without worry then?


With Android, you have explicit cause to worry, since Google seems to be incapable of doing anything about it.

From this year, alone:

The country's cyber security agency has issued an alert against an Android malware, dubbed "BlackRock", that has the potential to "steal" banking and other confidential data of a user. It can extract credentials and credit card information from over 300 apps such as email, e-commerce apps, social media apps, besides banking and financial apps, the CERT-In said in an advisory.

and

Android Trojan xHelper is how nasty? Collier wrote that "This is by far the nastiest infection I have encountered as a mobile malware researcher." His work always led him to believe that, though the last option, a factory reset could resolve even the worst infection. Not this time.

and

No sooner did we report on Wednesday the presence of a new batch of scammy Android apps that had to be removed from the Google Play Store (but not before racking up some 382 million downloads), than yet another wave of such apps has emerged to be aware of.

and

Google has struggled for years to keep malicious applications from sneaking into the Play Store, but a new round of takedowns is highlighting the challenge of getting the problem under control. At the beginning of March, Google removed 56 applications that appeared benign but were tainted with adware. They'd been downloaded more than a million times before.

and

There is a sweeping epidemic of malware making the rounds right now, and if you're not careful, you could end up with a load of malicious apps, fraudulent charges and popups on your device.

Joker first began circulating in 2017, but now, it's back with a vengeance. This "fleeceware" was just detected in 11 different apps and if you have them on your phone, you need to delete them immediately.

and

Cybersecurity researchers have unmasked six applications on the Google Play store with a combined total of over 200,000 downloads in yet another example of the highly persistent malware that has been plaguing Android users for the past three years.
 
2020-09-28 4:37:28 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: But, can, or can't apps on iPhone update themselves?


Nope.  Unlike on Android, an app infected with malware cannot independently install and run new kinds of malware.

So enjoy your malware that not even a factory reset will remove, I guess.
 
2020-09-28 4:48:30 PM  

BullBearMS: envirovore: Which store front providers are secure enough that users should feel safe enough to download any unknown app without worry then?

With Android, you have explicit cause to worry, since Google seems to be incapable of doing anything about it.

From this year, alone:

The country's cyber security agency has issued an alert against an Android malware, dubbed "BlackRock", that has the potential to "steal" banking and other confidential data of a user. It can extract credentials and credit card information from over 300 apps such as email, e-commerce apps, social media apps, besides banking and financial apps, the CERT-In said in an advisory.

and

Android Trojan xHelper is how nasty? Collier wrote that "This is by far the nastiest infection I have encountered as a mobile malware researcher." His work always led him to believe that, though the last option, a factory reset could resolve even the worst infection. Not this time.

and

No sooner did we report on Wednesday the presence of a new batch of scammy Android apps that had to be removed from the Google Play Store (but not before racking up some 382 million downloads), than yet another wave of such apps has emerged to be aware of.

and

Google has struggled for years to keep malicious applications from sneaking into the Play Store, but a new round of takedowns is highlighting the challenge of getting the problem under control. At the beginning of March, Google removed 56 applications that appeared benign but were tainted with adware. They'd been downloaded more than a million times before.

and

There is a sweeping epidemic of malware making the rounds right now, and if you're not careful, you could end up with a load of malicious apps, fraudulent charges and popups on your device.

Joker first began circulating in 2017, but now, it's back with a vengeance. This "fleeceware" was just detected in 11 different apps and if you have them on your phone, you need to delete them immediately.

and

Cybersecurity re ...


Conveniently ignoring that i already said we know it's not Google, posted that Apple isn't immune to it either, and still dodging the question. How's that echo there?

Again, as it's neither Google, nor Apple that are 100% secure enough that users can just download any old app they like without worry, which store fronts are secure enough to do so as according to you all store front providers are not so insecure that users not need worry about vetting apps before download?
 
2020-09-28 4:50:36 PM  
I mean, if you're going to claim there is a store front that is 100% secure for end users, it should be pretty easy to just name it.
 
2020-09-28 4:52:09 PM  

envirovore: Conveniently ignoring that i already said we know it's not Google, posted that Apple isn't immune to it either, and still dodging the question. How's that echo there?


LOL.  The difference between something being so common that it doesn't even warrant an article anymore unless it involves millions of victims and being exceptionally rare escapes you?
 
2020-09-28 4:54:58 PM  

BullBearMS: Ketchuponsteak: But, can, or can't apps on iPhone update themselves?

Nope.  Unlike on Android, an app infected with malware cannot independently install and run new kinds of malware.

So enjoy your malware that not even a factory reset will remove, I guess.


Uhm, I don't have any malware.'

Enjoy not being allowed to use your own phone, I guess?
 
2020-09-28 5:16:49 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: Enjoy not being allowed to use your own phone, I guess?


I can use it just fine.  Malware just cannot install unremovable malware.

Given that Google is busy adding the same restrictions to Android, they finally figured out they had farked up the original design.
 
2020-09-28 5:50:29 PM  

BullBearMS: Ketchuponsteak: Enjoy not being allowed to use your own phone, I guess?

I can use it just fine.  Malware just cannot install unremovable malware.

Given that Google is busy adding the same restrictions to Android, they finally figured out they had farked up the original design.


You keep talking about something else than what I asked.

Can, or can't, apps update themselves on iPhone?

Uh, well I guess you can use your phone just fine. I wouldn't be able to, as I kinda like my phone being mine. Which includes not using Google for anything if I so choose.
 
2020-09-28 6:12:48 PM  
 
2020-09-28 6:36:49 PM  
 
2020-09-28 10:28:36 PM  
Ketchuponsteak:

You keep talking about something else than what I asked.
Can, or can't, apps update themselves on iPhone?


If he/she won't answer, I will.  App updates in iOS happen through the app store.  You can turn on auto-updates (in which iOS will automatically check the app store for new versions and install them) but it isn't on by default.

I rather suspect Android does something similar.

I doubt that either store is perfect when it comes to checking incoming apps for anything naughty.  I suspect Apple may be a little more thorough about it.  But if you're sticking to big-name apps from well-known developers/companies, on either platform, I don't think apps are going to be your main security concern.
 
2020-09-29 6:42:22 AM  

dbirchall: Ketchuponsteak:

You keep talking about something else than what I asked.
Can, or can't, apps update themselves on iPhone?

If he/she won't answer, I will.  App updates in iOS happen through the app store.  You can turn on auto-updates (in which iOS will automatically check the app store for new versions and install them) but it isn't on by default.

I rather suspect Android does something similar.

I doubt that either store is perfect when it comes to checking incoming apps for anything naughty.  I suspect Apple may be a little more thorough about it.  But if you're sticking to big-name apps from well-known developers/companies, on either platform, I don't think apps are going to be your main security concern.


Android works the same. You can. Either set all apps to auto update, or manually choose to check for updates and install only the ones for apps you wish) , at least for apps installed through Google Play.

Any side loaded apps, you're on your own /it's up to the developer.
 
2020-09-29 6:52:02 AM  

dbirchall: Ketchuponsteak:

You keep talking about something else than what I asked.
Can, or can't, apps update themselves on iPhone?

If he/she won't answer, I will.  App updates in iOS happen through the app store.  You can turn on auto-updates (in which iOS will automatically check the app store for new versions and install them) but it isn't on by default.

I rather suspect Android does something similar.

I doubt that either store is perfect when it comes to checking incoming apps for anything naughty.  I suspect Apple may be a little more thorough about it.  But if you're sticking to big-name apps from well-known developers/companies, on either platform, I don't think apps are going to be your main security concern.


I am not concerned about malware at all actually, since I only download stuff I know about from other sources.

Android apps can update themselves, without interaction from the Play Store, which is how this particular malware gets past Googles vetting.

That's of course the price Android owners have to "pay" in order to actually "own" their own phone. Other wise you couldn't sideload apps, have several competing app stores etc.

For instance, if I for some reason wanted to play Fortnite on my phone, I could, because I can just install an .apk, or in my case, for fun, installed it through App Gallery (Huaweis competing store).

On iPhone, I suspect I'd be screwed.
 
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