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(NBC 10 Boston)   Size matters, say Harvard doctors who found that a common medical measurement helps predict risk of dying if you're hospitalized for COVID-19   (nbcboston.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Hospital, Physician, Red blood cell, senior author of the study, routine test of blood cells, high-risk COVID patients, patient mortality, Patient  
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2442 clicks; posted to Fandom » and STEM » on 25 Sep 2020 at 2:50 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



10 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-09-25 3:15:40 PM  
My guess would be your waistline
 
2020-09-25 3:20:20 PM  

Doctoral Candidate Zaius: My guess would be your waistline


Its the actual size of your red blood cells. Bigger cells = worse prognosis
 
2020-09-25 3:25:13 PM  
Finally, those of us who have been mocked for tiny blood cells have a reason to be proud!
 
2020-09-25 3:29:38 PM  
Well, my thalassemia minor finally brings me good news.
 
2020-09-25 3:41:16 PM  

Doctoral Candidate Zaius: My guess would be your waistline


Way back when, I got a list of the COVID deaths in Florida when it was only about 5,000.  Sorted by age.  The sub-50 people, with a dozen or so exceptions were all "BMI of 42", "morbidly obese", etc..  It would be nice if this encouraged Americans to not be such fatasses, but I doubt it.
 
2020-09-25 3:48:54 PM  

FLMountainMan: Doctoral Candidate Zaius: My guess would be your waistline

Way back when, I got a list of the COVID deaths in Florida when it was only about 5,000.  Sorted by age.  The sub-50 people, with a dozen or so exceptions were all "BMI of 42", "morbidly obese", etc..  It would be nice if this encouraged Americans to not be such fatasses, but I doubt it.


Why would this of all things promote people to live healthier and lose weight?

The diabeetus, amputations, heart disease, early deaths and lesser things like societal judgment haven't seemed to do the trick.

I get that fat shaming isn't a thing anymore, and weight isn't measured in pounds but in bravery, but maybe nudging people to take a little better care of themselves wouldn't hurt. I mean, aside from the actual strain of exercise.
 
2020-09-25 4:50:16 PM  

FLMountainMan: Doctoral Candidate Zaius: My guess would be your waistline

Way back when, I got a list of the COVID deaths in Florida when it was only about 5,000.  Sorted by age.  The sub-50 people, with a dozen or so exceptions were all "BMI of 42", "morbidly obese", etc..  It would be nice if this encouraged Americans to not be such fatasses, but I doubt it.


I have a friend who became obese in the past year, with what he found out was diabetes when he landed in the hospital with COVID. It woke him up, and he's getting back to his old self.
 
2020-09-25 5:02:13 PM  
I've always maintained that my blood cells may be small, but fierce.

/(The test actually isn't about absolute size, it's about variability)
 
2020-09-25 6:28:58 PM  

Doctoral Candidate Zaius: I get that fat shaming isn't a thing anymore


Funny man.
 
2020-09-26 3:20:49 AM  
Oh look! Another think that is just an indicator of bad health.

You need red blood cells to carry oxygen from your lungs to every part of your body. Anything outside of the normal range in red blood cell width or volume indicates a possible problem with bodily function that in turn may affect oxygen getting to various parts of your body

https://www.healthline.com/health/rdw​-​blood-test
 
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