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(The Verge)   You'll only be able to get everyone to quit using Windows XP after you pry the source code from our cold dead hands   (theverge.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Microsoft, Windows NT, Microsoft's source code, Operating system, Windows XP, leaked files, Microsoft Windows, operating systems' source code  
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1069 clicks; posted to Fandom » and STEM » on 25 Sep 2020 at 11:05 AM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-09-25 9:18:18 AM  
Did they also leak their convoluted build system? Good luck trying to get all that interweaved spaghetti to compile on your own.
 
2020-09-25 9:39:58 AM  
although the leaked files claim this code has been shared privately for years.

Windows as a whole has been open source to large companies for well over a decade now.
 
2020-09-25 10:42:13 AM  
Windows XP still runs Word 95.  That was the last good version of Word.  And it's blindingly fast.  I'm not sure what the new version of Word is doing.  Mining for bitcoin, most likely.
 
2020-09-25 10:50:26 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: Windows XP still runs Word 95.  That was the last good version of Word.  And it's blindingly fast.  I'm not sure what the new version of Word is doing.  Mining for bitcoin, most likely.


Clippy keeps trying to rebuild itself, takes a lot of resourses.
 
2020-09-25 10:50:45 AM  
resources too.
 
2020-09-25 10:52:04 AM  

koder: open source


I'd call that "visible source", not open source.  It's kind of like being able to see your rapist.
 
2020-09-25 11:15:01 AM  
It would be neat if someone took the source,updated it for modern computers minus all the BS from 8-10, and put that out. Illegal as hell but it'd still be neat.
 
2020-09-25 11:16:37 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: Windows XP still runs Word 95.  That was the last good version of Word.  And it's blindingly fast.  I'm not sure what the new version of Word is doing.  Mining for bitcoin, most likely.


The best running version of Word now -- is on iOS.

Seriously, if I have to do work in Word, and I can't use anything else, I use it on my iPad.  I think it's because the nature of a mobile OS forces them to be efficient.
 
2020-09-25 11:31:11 AM  
 I loved XP.  I like 10, my biggest gripe is that when you log into Windows 10, walk away, go get some coffee, cause it takes FOREVER to log in.  But, once it's all booted up, it's great.
 
2020-09-25 11:43:37 AM  

stuhayes2010: I loved XP.  I like 10, my biggest gripe is that when you log into Windows 10, walk away, go get some coffee, cause it takes FOREVER to log in.  But, once it's all booted up, it's great.


Something is *very* wrong with that. 1) what freaking build are you using, 2) home or work computer, 3) what's the hardware resources?

Because I have an older Yoga 2 tablet with 4 Gb of RAM, HDD, and a Dell with a SSD and 32 Gb of RAM and they both log on blindingly fast for home computers, and every variation of my work Dells were also fast login even with corporate security.

If you're on a company computer, their management is slowing you waaaaay down unless you were issued some 10 year old monstrosity with 2 Gb of RAM.
 
2020-09-25 11:45:17 AM  

stuhayes2010: I loved XP.  I like 10, my biggest gripe is that when you log into Windows 10, walk away, go get some coffee, cause it takes FOREVER to log in.  But, once it's all booted up, it's great.


My biggest gripe was walking away, getting some coffee, and the damn thing rebooted, applied a mysterious patch for hours and I lost all my work and a day of productivity.  It happened twice and then never again.

/because I don't use it anymore.
 
2020-09-25 11:45:48 AM  
XP Pro x64 was a great OS.
 
2020-09-25 11:47:34 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: Windows XP still runs Word 95.  That was the last good version of Word.  And it's blindingly fast.  I'm not sure what the new version of Word is doing.  Mining for bitcoin, most likely.


Who even installs office locally anymore join the cloud old man

stuhayes2010: I loved XP.  I like 10, my biggest gripe is that when you log into Windows 10, walk away, go get some coffee, cause it takes FOREVER to log in.  But, once it's all booted up, it's great.


What? It's been awhile since I've been on a HDD-based Win10 but my box on M.2 at home goes from power button to desktop in less than 15-25 seconds. Are you perhaps on a goofy domain of some sort?
 
2020-09-25 11:49:53 AM  

Wine Sipping Elitist: stuhayes2010: I loved XP.  I like 10, my biggest gripe is that when you log into Windows 10, walk away, go get some coffee, cause it takes FOREVER to log in.  But, once it's all booted up, it's great.

My biggest gripe was walking away, getting some coffee, and the damn thing rebooted, applied a mysterious patch for hours and I lost all my work and a day of productivity.  It happened twice and then never again.

/because I don't use it anymore.


Or maybe it was the time after reinstallation that it applied a mysterious patch and then bootlooped, so I had to reinstall and block the internet until it was finished, setup and cloned, internet restored, and when I woke up the next day it was back in a bootloop.  I didn't even bother to reimage, I just gave up.
 
2020-09-25 11:50:59 AM  

koder: although the leaked files claim this code has been shared privately for years.

Windows as a whole has been open source to large companies for well over a decade now.


I remember getting this code quite some time ago, at least the WinXP and DOS source code. This is basically a newer repackaging of the code.

My old copy is either sitting on a dusty hard drive in my attic, or lost. This package will get a safer home (40gb!) on my one of my NAS boxes and a backup external.
 
2020-09-25 11:53:49 AM  

Keyser_Soze_Death: ro x64 was a great OS.


It was!!  In like 1856 when it was relevant.  shiats been defunct for over a decade.   The people who pine nostalgic for it are troubled and need medication.   The same people that think 8-bit graphics are somehow desirable.
 
2020-09-25 11:53:55 AM  

stuhayes2010: I loved XP.  I like 10, my biggest gripe is that when you log into Windows 10, walk away, go get some coffee, cause it takes FOREVER to log in.  But, once it's all booted up, it's great.


Is that a home or business Win 10 machine?

I'm here doing the 'Work From Home' thing, and I have two machines side by side here on my desk - my own personal workstation (homebuilt, just upgraded from Win 7 Ultimate x64 to Win10 Pro x64 2004 last month), and my employer-provided work laptop (Win 10 Enterprise 1809 x64).  Both are on SSDs.

I sit down and power them on at the same time, and it's no contest - my homebuilt gets me to the desktop in half the time of the laptop.

I've been attributing that to all the corporate software crap, but in reality, I'm sure there are multiple factors.

The laptop is a Core i7-5600 @ 2.6 GHz, with 16 GB of RAM; its SSD is an M.2 NVME.

The desktop is a Core i7-870 @ 2.93 GHz, with 16 GB of RAM; its SSD is a SATA.

The laptop has to start by reading the chip on my badge to let me log in, connects to my WiFi, and then immediately starts its VPN client.

I usually just start browsing Fark on the desktop until the laptop catches up.
 
2020-09-25 11:57:54 AM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: stuhayes2010: I loved XP.  I like 10, my biggest gripe is that when you log into Windows 10, walk away, go get some coffee, cause it takes FOREVER to log in.  But, once it's all booted up, it's great.

Is that a home or business Win 10 machine?

I'm here doing the 'Work From Home' thing, and I have two machines side by side here on my desk - my own personal workstation (homebuilt, just upgraded from Win 7 Ultimate x64 to Win10 Pro x64 2004 last month), and my employer-provided work laptop (Win 10 Enterprise 1809 x64).  Both are on SSDs.

I sit down and power them on at the same time, and it's no contest - my homebuilt gets me to the desktop in half the time of the laptop.

I've been attributing that to all the corporate software crap, but in reality, I'm sure there are multiple factors.

The laptop is a Core i7-5600 @ 2.6 GHz, with 16 GB of RAM; its SSD is an M.2 NVME.

The desktop is a Core i7-870 @ 2.93 GHz, with 16 GB of RAM; its SSD is a SATA.

The laptop has to start by reading the chip on my badge to let me log in, connects to my WiFi, and then immediately starts its VPN client.

I usually just start browsing Fark on the desktop until the laptop catches up.


Should have added that my home system is also connecting to my home domain and mapping about a dozen network drives.
 
2020-09-25 12:02:08 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: connecting to my home domain


Home .... domain?!


The hell do you need a home domain for?   Too many users for self management?
 
2020-09-25 12:15:14 PM  

PadreScout: Keyser_Soze_Death: ro x64 was a great OS.

It was!!  In like 1856 when it was relevant.  shiats been defunct for over a decade.   The people who pine nostalgic for it are troubled and need medication.   The same people that think 8-bit graphics are somehow desirable.


Hell, my Compaq 8000 laptop with XP, 18 years old and definitely "off network" (my music server) has an old ATI Radeon video card with 16 Mb of memory that will still give most i5 Intel integrated Graphics® a run for their money on playback. If that thing ever dies I'm really going to miss it, but I had to plug in a 256 Gb USB drive to hold my music because the 80 Gb HDD is still full of Windows SP3 and programs.
 
2020-09-25 12:18:50 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: stuhayes2010: I loved XP.  I like 10, my biggest gripe is that when you log into Windows 10, walk away, go get some coffee, cause it takes FOREVER to log in.  But, once it's all booted up, it's great.

Is that a home or business Win 10 machine?

I'm here doing the 'Work From Home' thing, and I have two machines side by side here on my desk - my own personal workstation (homebuilt, just upgraded from Win 7 Ultimate x64 to Win10 Pro x64 2004 last month), and my employer-provided work laptop (Win 10 Enterprise 1809 x64).  Both are on SSDs.

I sit down and power them on at the same time, and it's no contest - my homebuilt gets me to the desktop in half the time of the laptop.

I've been attributing that to all the corporate software crap, but in reality, I'm sure there are multiple factors.

The laptop is a Core i7-5600 @ 2.6 GHz, with 16 GB of RAM; its SSD is an M.2 NVME.

The desktop is a Core i7-870 @ 2.93 GHz, with 16 GB of RAM; its SSD is a SATA.

The laptop has to start by reading the chip on my badge to let me log in, connects to my WiFi, and then immediately starts its VPN client.

I usually just start browsing Fark on the desktop until the laptop catches up.


Its work
 
2020-09-25 12:25:25 PM  

stuhayes2010: I loved XP.  I like 10, my biggest gripe is that when you log into Windows 10, walk away, go get some coffee, cause it takes FOREVER to log in.  But, once it's all booted up, it's great.


That's why I switched to Arch, and I run my Windows10 Ent for work in a VM
 
2020-09-25 12:26:49 PM  

PadreScout: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: connecting to my home domain

Home .... domain?!


The hell do you need a home domain for?   Too many users for self management?


Well, we have four adults in this house, and all of us are IT types.  A domain lets us have file & print, central patch management (WSUS), a WDS Image server, and central authentication to the three NAS's.  It's just more convenient for us.  Two domain controllers, a print server, a database server, a patch server, an image server, and bulk storage.

Maybe it isn't / wasn't strictly 'necessary', but I started putting this together long ago to get a leg up on stuff for work.  At the time, we were running three (3!) simultaneous network O/S's - Novell NetWare, DEC's DECnet, and Microsoft WFW / Win NT 3.5.

I was a NetWare SysAdmin, and also handled client configuration.  Clients were Windows 3.1 or Windows for Workgroups 3.1.1, so essentially a GUI pasted on top of DOS.  And they needed to be able to access *all three* networks.  And still have enough free RAM to run Office.

Three sets of drivers.  Three network protocols (DECnet, IPX/SPX, and TCP/IP).  Supporting three different network cards, two different memory managers, and a mix of video boards.  The DOS memory map, including locations and sizes of various ROMs, made this a somewhat challenging jigsaw puzzle.

Eventually, they decided to can NetWare and DEC and settle on Windows, starting with Windows 2000, and I was tapped to be the Windows domain / network SysAdmin.  So I set up a system at home, and took the MCSE for Win 2000 classes, to get up to speed.  (I had already been running NetWare 3 at home, also as a 'Let's Learn This' lab.)

At any rate, with two decades of home domain use solidly entrenched now, I'd never go back - especially since I'd be giving up the advantages of Windows 10 Patching Control that come with WSUS.  Not to mention being able to leverage Acronis and WDS to backup systems and easily deploy new systems.

We've added phones, tablets, laptops, smart TVs, media servers, databases (DataCrow is *great* for tracking books, music, videos, etc - I wish it was still supported!), Blu-Ray players, and a lot of other stuff.  There's a Linux bench in the server room now, and a handful of Raspberry PI's.  Our systems are a mix of production, experimentation, learning, and playground.
 
2020-09-25 12:28:37 PM  
Windows 2000 was the last version of NT where Dave Cutler was in charge of the OS, and XP was a .1 version that added features home users needed, like working Plug and Play.

Dave is an industry legend whose philosophy was that if a user mode program can take down the OS, no matter what, it's the fault of the OS and the OS needs to be fixed to prevent it.  If you worked under Dave, there were no excuses allowed.  That's why 2000 and XP have endured as the high water mark for Windows.

Of course, that doesn't apply to drivers, which can screw up anything, and after Windows 2000 came out it was the drivers that you had to watch out for problems with.

Since Dave moved on to developing the core tech behind Azure and the virtualization used on the XBox, Windows has absolutely declined during his absence.  Windows 10 is a buggy ass mess.

Oral History of Dave Cutler Part 1
Youtube 29RkHH-psrY
 
2020-09-25 12:30:30 PM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: At any rate, with two decades of home domain use solidly entrenched now, I'd never go back - especially since I'd be giving up the advantages of Windows 10 Patching Control that come with WSUS. Not to mention being able to leverage Acronis and WDS to backup systems and easily deploy new systems.



You think it's neat and like spending time on it. Gotcha.  A valid reason.

I'm just more into ... the most direct solution to a problem, but you know ... setting up a print server is fun too.
 
2020-09-25 12:33:03 PM  

PadreScout: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: connecting to my home domain

Home .... domain?!


The hell do you need a home domain for?   Too many users for self management?


(I should have added the real reason we have a domain - my hobby is building PCs.  Having a domain is an excuse to build computers. ;-)

Before the domain, back when PCs were new, and relatively more expensive than they are now, I built many a machine and gave them away, to friends who were writers, artists, whatever.  People who could benefit from the 'empowering' aspects of having a machine, but who couldn't afford one on their own.)
 
2020-09-25 4:02:07 PM  

jake_lex: Marcus Aurelius: Windows XP still runs Word 95.  That was the last good version of Word.  And it's blindingly fast.  I'm not sure what the new version of Word is doing.  Mining for bitcoin, most likely.

The best running version of Word now -- is on iOS.

Seriously, if I have to do work in Word, and I can't use anything else, I use it on my iPad.  I think it's because the nature of a mobile OS forces them to be efficient.


How is it better than Word for Windows Phone or Android?
 
2020-09-25 5:22:45 PM  
That monotone noise you're hearing right now is the ReactOS guys having a continuous orgasm since the leak.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ReactOS​
https://reactos.org/
 
2020-09-25 8:49:40 PM  
Phssh, the source code to the OS I use was leaked nearly 30 years ago.
bdmpublications.comView Full Size
 
2020-09-25 11:22:42 PM  
Cue the one farker who proudly proclaims his Windows 7 rig works just fine and angrily denounces anyone who runs 10.

/ personally agnostic. Runs 10 pro on the main box because that's what people pay for, runs Linux on the other 6 boxes.
 
2020-09-26 11:19:11 AM  

Nicholas D. Wolfwood: stuhayes2010: I loved XP.  I like 10, my biggest gripe is that when you log into Windows 10, walk away, go get some coffee, cause it takes FOREVER to log in.  But, once it's all booted up, it's great.

Is that a home or business Win 10 machine?

I'm here doing the 'Work From Home' thing, and I have two machines side by side here on my desk - my own personal workstation (homebuilt, just upgraded from Win 7 Ultimate x64 to Win10 Pro x64 2004 last month), and my employer-provided work laptop (Win 10 Enterprise 1809 x64).  Both are on SSDs.

I sit down and power them on at the same time, and it's no contest - my homebuilt gets me to the desktop in half the time of the laptop.

I've been attributing that to all the corporate software crap, but in reality, I'm sure there are multiple factors.

The laptop is a Core i7-5600 @ 2.6 GHz, with 16 GB of RAM; its SSD is an M.2 NVME.

The desktop is a Core i7-870 @ 2.93 GHz, with 16 GB of RAM; its SSD is a SATA.

The laptop has to start by reading the chip on my badge to let me log in, connects to my WiFi, and then immediately starts its VPN client.

I usually just start browsing Fark on the desktop until the laptop catches up.


That's definitely a work issue.  Something in your corporate IT build is slowing down your login.  It's probably the combination of smart card login, VPN auto-connect, and what I can image are the the half-dozen security and compliance tools that you have.

That's not an issue with Windows 10.  That's an issue with your IT department.

PadreScout: Nicholas D. Wolfwood: connecting to my home domain

Home .... domain?!


The hell do you need a home domain for?   Too many users for self management?


A lot of people in the IT field have home labs.  They're used for learning new technologies, trying out things before doing them at work, or (in some job roles) as a demo environment.

I work for an IT vendor, and while my employer provides me with access to multiple lab environments for learning and demos, I still run my own.
 
rpm
2020-09-26 6:25:43 PM  

Keyser_Soze_Death: XP Pro x64 was a great OS.


You really, really should get that brain damage looked at.
 
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