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(Phys Org2)   Gravity causes homogeneity of the universe. Entropy for the win   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, General relativity, mathematical methods, Such analyses, Universe, fundamental open questions of cosmology, Big Bang, present state, modern mathematical methods  
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360 clicks; posted to Fandom » and STEM » on 24 Sep 2020 at 12:59 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



22 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-09-24 11:16:00 AM  
Huh.  So, I can just blame my homogeneity on gravity?  Good to know.  I'll be waiting patiently for Lady Gaga to release a song about how gravity made me this way.

Wait...  What?
 
2020-09-24 12:51:51 PM  
I'm pretty sure that gravity is working against me.
 
2020-09-24 1:11:49 PM  
NTTAWWT
 
2020-09-24 1:15:52 PM  
What about the pasteurization of the universe?
 
2020-09-24 1:16:09 PM  
img.redbull.comView Full Size


WHAT ENT ROPEY MIGHT LOOK LIKE.
 
2020-09-24 1:16:38 PM  

fragMasterFlash: I'm pretty sure that gravity is working against me.


At least it keeps u from flying off an earth that is rotating at close to 1000mph.
 
2020-09-24 1:17:15 PM  

turbocucumber: What about the pasteurization of the universe?


You think that the speed of light is fast?   Pfft.   Milk is faster, because it's pasteurized before you see it.
 
2020-09-24 1:17:43 PM  

turbocucumber: What about the pasteurization of the universe?


Being at well below -200 fahrenheit it should be good.
 
2020-09-24 1:28:27 PM  
In an effort to actually understand what is being discussed here, I looked up the paper.  The abstract:

Any 2+1 dimensional Einsteinian spacetime with positive cosmological constant and compact hyperbolic spatial topology evolves in the expanding direction to a de Sitter model with homogeneous hyperbolic spatial geometry. In particular, the latter constitutes the uniform future attractor for this class of spacetimes for arbitrary large initial data. This is an example of large-data homogenization and demonstrates the ability of gravitation to cause late time homogenization in the evolution of cosmological models independently of their initial state.

This sounds like purely mathematical masturbation at the moment, but let's say it's testable and eventually proven that there's a solution space for the evolution of the present state of the universe that is (if I'm understanding it right) independent of quantum mechanics.  I'm wondering if they expect this to potentially say more about the early universe or the nature of dark matter or something.
 
2020-09-24 1:29:17 PM  

dittybopper: turbocucumber: What about the pasteurization of the universe?

You think that the speed of light is fast?   Pfft.   Milk is faster, because it's pasteurized before you see it.


Never milked a cow?

/Just me?
//Oh...nevermind then
///I'll spare the thread the gruesome details
 
2020-09-24 1:39:23 PM  
"This insight is based on theoretical studies of the physicist David Fajman of the University of Vienna."

Relax, people. They didn't dissect Fajman. They only studied him in theory. Nevertheless, he was quite informative and his daughter wasn't actually harmed.
 
2020-09-24 1:57:21 PM  

BeesNuts: dittybopper: turbocucumber: What about the pasteurization of the universe?

You think that the speed of light is fast?   Pfft.   Milk is faster, because it's pasteurized before you see it.

Never milked a cow?

/Just me?
//Oh...nevermind then
///I'll spare the thread the gruesome details


Better than milking a bull...
 
2020-09-24 1:57:57 PM  

BeesNuts: In an effort to actually understand what is being discussed here, I looked up the paper.  The abstract:

Any 2+1 dimensional Einsteinian spacetime with positive cosmological constant and compact hyperbolic spatial topology evolves in the expanding direction to a de Sitter model with homogeneous hyperbolic spatial geometry. In particular, the latter constitutes the uniform future attractor for this class of spacetimes for arbitrary large initial data. This is an example of large-data homogenization and demonstrates the ability of gravitation to cause late time homogenization in the evolution of cosmological models independently of their initial state.

This sounds like purely mathematical masturbation at the moment, but let's say it's testable and eventually proven that there's a solution space for the evolution of the present state of the universe that is (if I'm understanding it right) independent of quantum mechanics.  I'm wondering if they expect this to potentially say more about the early universe or the nature of dark matter or something.


It's not clear to me whether this is addressing something different from the homogeneity problem that inflation was introduced to solve, so I'm a little confused about the paper.

Also, this paper isn't testable because it assumes a 3D spacetime, instead of 4D.  It's more of a proof-of-concept to show that, under some assumptions, a gravity-like theory can lead to a smooth expanding universe regardless of how the Big Bang started out.
 
2020-09-24 2:32:12 PM  

OldJames: Better than milking a bull...


You're a homogeneityphobe.
 
2020-09-24 2:49:43 PM  

BeesNuts: dittybopper: turbocucumber: What about the pasteurization of the universe?

You think that the speed of light is fast?   Pfft.   Milk is faster, because it's pasteurized before you see it.

Never milked a cow?

/Just me?
//Oh...nevermind then
///I'll spare the thread the gruesome details


I'm from Washington County, NY.  More cows than people.   I've seen it done.

But hey, thanks for ruining the "past your eyes" joke.
 
2020-09-24 2:51:37 PM  

Linux_Yes: fragMasterFlash: I'm pretty sure that gravity is working against me.

At least it keeps u from flying off an earth that is rotating at close to 1000mph.


Only around the equator.  Where I am, it's probably in the 500 - 700 mph range.
 
2020-09-24 2:54:50 PM  

Linux_Yes: fragMasterFlash: I'm pretty sure that gravity is working against me.

At least it keeps u from flying off an earth that is rotating at close to 1000mph.


On second thought, *never* give a rotating object's "speed" using a linear measure.

It always bugs the hell out of me on Battlebots when they talk about a spinning weapon moving at X mph.  Quote it in RPM, dammit!

By that measure, Earth is spinning at 1/1440 RPM.  Doesn't sound like you need to hold on real tight when you put it that way.
 
2020-09-24 2:56:09 PM  

dittybopper: turbocucumber: What about the pasteurization of the universe?

You think that the speed of light is fast?   Pfft.   Milk is faster, because it's pasteurized before you see it.


Actually, no.  Back on our dairy farm, I always saw it before it was pasteurized.
 
2020-09-24 2:57:00 PM  

OldJames: BeesNuts: dittybopper: turbocucumber: What about the pasteurization of the universe?

You think that the speed of light is fast?   Pfft.   Milk is faster, because it's pasteurized before you see it.

Never milked a cow?

/Just me?
//Oh...nevermind then
///I'll spare the thread the gruesome details

Better than milking a bull...


Amen to *that*!
 
2020-09-24 3:01:49 PM  

BeesNuts: In an effort to actually understand what is being discussed here, I looked up the paper.  The abstract:

Any 2+1 dimensional Einsteinian spacetime with positive cosmological constant and compact hyperbolic spatial topology evolves in the expanding direction to a de Sitter model with homogeneous hyperbolic spatial geometry. In particular, the latter constitutes the uniform future attractor for this class of spacetimes for arbitrary large initial data. This is an example of large-data homogenization and demonstrates the ability of gravitation to cause late time homogenization in the evolution of cosmological models independently of their initial state.

This sounds like purely mathematical masturbation at the moment,



What else did you expect, it's abstract
 
2020-09-24 3:21:24 PM  

Ambitwistor: Also, this paper isn't testable because it assumes a 3D spacetime, instead of 4D.  It's more of a proof-of-concept to show that, under some assumptions, a gravity-like theory can lead to a smooth expanding universe regardless of how the Big Bang started out.


So, he assumed a spherical universe?
 
2020-09-24 5:22:05 PM  

LewDux: BeesNuts: In an effort to actually understand what is being discussed here, I looked up the paper.  The abstract:

Any 2+1 dimensional Einsteinian spacetime with positive cosmological constant and compact hyperbolic spatial topology evolves in the expanding direction to a de Sitter model with homogeneous hyperbolic spatial geometry. In particular, the latter constitutes the uniform future attractor for this class of spacetimes for arbitrary large initial data. This is an example of large-data homogenization and demonstrates the ability of gravitation to cause late time homogenization in the evolution of cosmological models independently of their initial state.

This sounds like purely mathematical masturbation at the moment,


What else did you expect, it's abstract


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