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(NPR)   What kind of books are best to read during this pandemic? Subby is going with The Plague by Camus   (npr.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, African American, lot of people, kind of books, young people, African-American literature, reading lists, short stories of Richard Wright, African American literature  
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99 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 24 Sep 2020 at 9:49 AM (21 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-09-24 8:52:57 AM  
Journal of a Plague Year

The Decameron
 
2020-09-24 9:23:49 AM  
The Stand
 
2020-09-24 9:28:03 AM  
It seems pointless to read crappy pandemic themed books, just because there's a pandemic.  Read something good, whatever the genre.

I'm currently halfway through the Thursday Next books by Jasper Fforde.  I resisted them a long time because I assumed it would be based on yet another generic vapid petticoat relationship heroine strolling through English literature.  It's better than I expected and I'm enjoying it.

I hit a string of of four straight series that failed miserably on their final book, so it's nice to see an author who trusts their editor/uses an editor.
 
2020-09-24 9:31:27 AM  
The Left Hand of Darkness
Any of the Dorothy Sayers Peter Whimsey/Harriet Vane mysteries
 
2020-09-24 9:34:41 AM  
I just finished the audio version of Goon Squad by Johnathan L. Howard. It's super fun and actiony. I would suggest that. His other books are great too.

I'd also suggest the First Law series by Joe Abercrombie, anything by Larry Correia, anything by Jim Butcher or anything read by John Lee.
 
2020-09-24 9:39:38 AM  

iheartscotch: I just finished the audio version of Goon Squad by Johnathan L. Howard. It's super fun and actiony. I would suggest that. His other books are great too.

I'd also suggest the First Law series by Joe Abercrombie, anything by Larry Correia, anything by Jim Butcher or anything read by John Lee.


I would also suggest The Powder Mage trilogy by Brian McClellan, Mage Errant by John Bierce or the Red Knight series by Miles Cameron.
 
2020-09-24 9:51:06 AM  
Anything by Phillip K Dick. Though the dystopia is becoming more real every day so I'll soon switch to someone else.
 
2020-09-24 9:56:11 AM  
Its close to Halloween so I always read horror this time of year. Im about halfway through The Ruins which is ok but the protagonists are horror movie stereotype stupid and Im not that into it.

Its not really my style of horror I prefer the gothic haunted house type stuff.
 
2020-09-24 9:59:05 AM  
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2020-09-24 10:05:14 AM  

HedlessChickn: The Stand


'Abridged version'
 
2020-09-24 10:11:22 AM  
The Plague is good but The Stranger is a better read. Oddly, it fits right into 2020 as well.
 
2020-09-24 10:24:30 AM  
Clan of the Cave Bear series by Jean Auel - It deals with relationships, survival and isolation.

Tomorrow War by J.L. Bourne - Survival story that's been written A LOT by recent authors, but this is the best it's been written

Hyperbole and a Half by Allie Brosch - Recent stories that make ya feel good
 
2020-09-24 10:25:24 AM  
The new book by Carl Hiaasen called "Squeeze Me".

First novel I've read concerning our current crises. Plus snakes.
 
2020-09-24 10:28:23 AM  

Subtonic: HedlessChickn: The Stand

'Abridged version'


The miniseries holds up if you're in to early 90s nostalgia
 
2020-09-24 10:29:51 AM  
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2020-09-24 10:51:51 AM  

Hooker with a Penis: The Ruins which is ok but the protagonists are horror movie stereotype stupid and Im not that into it.


You know why authors and screenwriters write people as stereotypically stupid in horror?  Because we are, as the current pandemic is proving quite conclusively.  At this point, I don't doubt that if a real world zombie virus were to emerge, enough people would rush into the ravening hordes screaming "FAKE ZOMBIES!", even as they were torn to pieces and consumed, that mankind's fall would be virtually assured.

That said, the only pandemic-related book I've read recently was a re-read of The Stand.  But I read that this past fall, just a couple months before the real-world pandemic began.  The last two books I read were Riot Baby (more of a novella in length) and The Long War,which I just finished this morning.
 
2020-09-24 10:56:21 AM  
Good books
 
2020-09-24 10:58:15 AM  
I love horror anthologies.  Horror seems right for 2020.  Even though they are old, I love Steven King's Night Shift and Skeleton Crew.  Mind you, he is not an intellectual author, he is a storyteller.  Many people discount his work, but I think his short stories are just perfect.  I read them at night with a tiny book light and all the lights off.  If the phone rings I jump out of my skin.  lol

I just finished some of the Best Horror of the Year series, edited by Ellen Datlow.  Some are great, some not so much, but I really like being able to read works by so many different authors all with different styles of writing.
 
2020-09-24 11:23:08 AM  
I'm re-reading the Lucas Davenport 'Prey' books from the beginning. Lots of police brutality, but Clara Rinker is a fun villain...
 
2020-09-24 11:33:11 AM  
A Canticle For Leibowitz by Walter M. Miller Jr.

I re-read it pretty much yearly.
 
2020-09-24 12:24:28 PM  
Well, Camus can do, but Sartre is smartre.
 
2020-09-24 12:28:15 PM  
If you're looking for an interesting virus read, I like Demon in the Freezer.  Other good books I've enjoyed lately are The Boys in the Boat and American Gods (which I've almost finished).
 
2020-09-24 12:58:29 PM  
One sentence Cliffs Notes

The Plague:  SHOW US YOUR BUBOES!

(It's one of my favorite books.)
 
2020-09-24 1:22:25 PM  

brap: One sentence Cliffs Notes

The Plague:  SHOW US YOUR BUBOES!

(It's one of my favorite books.)


Honestly one of the few books I put down.  Not because it's terrible, it isn't - just got hammered into "No... enough" by the relentless "Everything is completely farked no matter what" vibe.  It's Camus, I know - but still The Plague just finally hit my, "Jesus Christ just... no." line.  Yep, bad stuff happens, and people are powerless to do much about it, but that book hammers that in with a Finnish guy and a hydraulic press.
 
2020-09-24 2:11:51 PM  
Currently working on this one.
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2020-09-24 2:31:33 PM  
target.scene7.comView Full Size


Read this during this summer. Frighteningly spot on story about how people respond to a pandemic.
 
2020-09-24 3:38:35 PM  

Subtonic: HedlessChickn: The Stand

'Abridged version'


This. Long ago I read the uncut version and about all I can remember about it is that it seemed like it could do without a few hundred pages. In other words, the editor had it right the first time.
 
2020-09-24 3:40:02 PM  
After a five year wait, Jim Butcher's new Dresden Files novel came out a couple months ago with another one coming out next week.
 
2020-09-24 6:54:57 PM  
d1w7fb2mkkr3kw.cloudfront.netView Full Size

This one, right now.  Pretty damned interesting about a very underrated film.
 
2020-09-24 7:51:47 PM  
South by Ernest Shackleton is good.  Headed down to cross Antarctica, ship becomes icebound and crushed and there is no way to contact the outside world.  Spoiler: Shackleton brings everyone back alive.  Some amazing photographs as well.
 
2020-09-24 9:08:11 PM  

Tr0mBoNe: Subtonic: HedlessChickn: The Stand

'Abridged version'

The miniseries holds up if you're in to early 90s nostalgia


You really think so? I remember watching that and despising every single character in the show. It was disappointing they didn't all die horribly. I much preferred the book. But IMO King's books never translate to the screen well.
 
2020-09-25 9:08:06 AM  
 
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