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(The Register)   Watch out Intel and AMD, India has just started creating their own microprocessors running at a blistering speed of 100Mhz   (theregister.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, Integrated circuit, ARM architecture, Embedded system, None of the device, Microprocessor, working sample of a new RISC-V, small step, best practice  
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556 clicks; posted to Fandom » and STEM » on 24 Sep 2020 at 9:13 AM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-09-24 8:54:17 AM  
Better than I can do.
 
2020-09-24 9:07:55 AM  
Better than 95% of countries can do, honestly. It's a start and still useful.. most computing applications don't need huge clock speeds.
 
2020-09-24 9:14:14 AM  
This is a new thing.  This is open source hardware.  I love open source hardware.  Intel, Apple, and many other already hate the very idea with the passion of a million suns.

So pick a side.
 
2020-09-24 9:22:51 AM  
Lots of projects don't need the ghz we usually expect. If they can build it, people can find a good use for it.
 
2020-09-24 9:25:56 AM  
the component uses the 32-bit Shakti E-class core

Not to be confused with eShakti, who makes dresses you can customize.
 
2020-09-24 9:30:31 AM  
It's a start.
 
2020-09-24 9:34:22 AM  
I was able to do a LOT with 2mhz processors. I look at control systems today and WTF at how they were able to squander such resources.

This is a legitimate product with a solid market. They're doing fine.
 
2020-09-24 9:44:53 AM  
I'll start being concerned when they have one that runs at 100 MHz, not 100 Mhz.
 
2020-09-24 10:05:52 AM  

Tr0mBoNe: Better than 95% of countries can do, honestly. It's a start and still useful.. most computing applications don't need huge clock speeds.


But everybody wants to know does it run Crysis?
 
2020-09-24 10:10:47 AM  
Well, that's 100 times faster than 6800 and 6502 I cut my teeth on. Should be enough for anyone!
 
2020-09-24 10:21:42 AM  
Fabbed using a 180nm process and named Moushik, the component uses the 32-bit Shakti E-class core and can run at between 75Mhz and 100MHz. Its motherboard has Arduino-compatible headers, so can work with various daughter-cards, and also has must-haves like GPIO and UART support. Those specs make it suited to IoT and embedded applications.

Enough to get me curious.
 
2020-09-24 10:24:11 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-09-24 10:36:47 AM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: [Fark user image 500x375]


It was good enough for Spock:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-09-24 10:48:41 AM  
Users can e-mail, use stripped down social media apps (FB and others would be insane to let someone else develop a skinny app when there is the potential for a billion users), and connects to Arduino cards.

Some 17-year-old in Mumbai will be a billionaire by the end of 2021.
 
2020-09-24 10:49:05 AM  
It takes time to rev up a semiconductor industry. They probably haven't even started their intellectual property theft and patent-ignoring operations yet.
 
2020-09-24 11:01:29 AM  
Arduino doesn't really need a hyperthreaded 16 core jiggawat ghz heat dissipator to get shiat done.
More places should fabricate.
 
DVD
2020-09-24 11:05:20 AM  
Subby?  Subby?  Where is subby to get his comeuppance curry for his mocking of Mumbai microprocessing?

It really is a solid, profitable start, not something to chuckle at politely and walk away from.
 
2020-09-24 11:22:05 AM  
I have very basic knowledge of chip architecture and absolute ZERO knowledge about chip manufacturing, and with that said, I am shocked that India didn't already have something WAY more advanced than that.  India is home to some of the best electrical engineers in the world.

That said, 75-100Mhz, 32 bit, 180nm processor couldn't run my smartwatch and its about 10x the size and weight of it... which is nice... I guess... if you are into that sort of thing... 🤣

Still, congrats to them for the achievement!
 
2020-09-24 11:48:43 AM  

Orallo: That said, 75-100Mhz, 32 bit, 180nm processor couldn't run my smartwatch and its about 10x the size and weight of it... which is nice... I guess... if you are into that sort of thing...


Well, if you're making basic computing devices for the poors, that's perfectly acceptable.

And if you've got a space program, which India has, larger processors are less susceptible to things like bit flipping due to radiation, so that's also a plus.

Then too, not everything needs to be as small or as capable as a smartwatch.  Embedded controllers for example.  There are companies still making 8 bit MCUs

https://www.microcontrollertips.com/8​-​bits-counting-8-bit-mcus-going-strong/​
 
2020-09-24 12:30:51 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: This is a new thing.  This is open source hardware.  I love open source hardware.  Intel, Apple, and many other already hate the very idea with the passion of a million suns.

So pick a side.


Mercans like their procs having their own separate network interface and access to ram with its own separate processor within the processor.

Makes em feel safe i guess.  Or something like that.
 
2020-09-24 12:31:29 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: This is a new thing.  This is open source hardware.  I love open source hardware.  Intel, Apple, and many other already hate the very idea with the passion of a million suns.

So pick a side.


For mobile

Librem 5
 
2020-09-24 12:32:39 PM  

Meltro: I was able to do a LOT with 2mhz processors. I look at control systems today and WTF at how they were able to squander such resources.

This is a legitimate product with a solid market. They're doing fine.


Bloatware loves gobbling up cpu cycles.

Better to spy on you, my dear.
 
2020-09-24 12:34:40 PM  

DVD: Subby?  Subby?  Where is subby to get his comeuppance curry for his mocking of Mumbai microprocessing?

It really is a solid, profitable start, not something to chuckle at politely and walk away from.


BIG THINGS


have small beginnings
 
2020-09-24 12:50:46 PM  
That "Branch Prediction" thing is cool, and how the hell does it even work?
 
2020-09-24 12:58:45 PM  

gbv23: That "Branch Prediction" thing is cool, and how the hell does it even work?


It can be as simple as assuming  the forward jump won't be taken, or be as complex as having an idle unit run another branch while the code decides which branch is right.
 
2020-09-24 1:17:03 PM  

indy_kid: Users can e-mail, use stripped down social media apps (FB and others would be insane to let someone else develop a skinny app when there is the potential for a billion users), and connects to Arduino cards.

Some 17-year-old in Mumbai will be a billionaire by the end of 2021.


Well yes, but you can also purchase an Rasberry Pi.

Russia build their own CPU as well, and that will get used, as all public institutions will be forced to use it.

Theirs isn't particularly slow though.
 
2020-09-24 1:19:57 PM  

dittybopper: Orallo: That said, 75-100Mhz, 32 bit, 180nm processor couldn't run my smartwatch and its about 10x the size and weight of it... which is nice... I guess... if you are into that sort of thing...

Well, if you're making basic computing devices for the poors, that's perfectly acceptable.

And if you've got a space program, which India has, larger processors are less susceptible to things like bit flipping due to radiation, so that's also a plus.

Then too, not everything needs to be as small or as capable as a smartwatch.  Embedded controllers for example.  There are companies still making 8 bit MCUs

https://www.microcontrollertips.com/8-​bits-counting-8-bit-mcus-going-strong/​


No its not acceptable at all, because you can purchase ARM based microcomputers for a fraction of the price.

The poor shouldn't be punished, because India can't build better than this, yet. It is a good start, but you can't argue that anyone should have to use it, when better and cheaper alternatives is available.
 
2020-09-24 4:01:28 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: Well yes, but you can also purchase an Rasberry Pi.


Which uses a proprietary SOC developed by a British company that won't provide documentation unless you plan on buying 100,000+ units, and is waaaaay overkill for a lot of applications.

I love me some Atmel ATTiny processors. All the nifty of an Arduino, but $2.50 / per, and they run on microwatts. I keep finding new uses for them in widgets that would have taken 10 times the part count.

That, and India is probably a little less than happy using stuff produced by SMIC, and has every reason to develop their own foundries.
 
2020-09-24 4:10:25 PM  

dittybopper: Orallo: That said, 75-100Mhz, 32 bit, 180nm processor couldn't run my smartwatch and its about 10x the size and weight of it... which is nice... I guess... if you are into that sort of thing...

Well, if you're making basic computing devices for the poors, that's perfectly acceptable.

And if you've got a space program, which India has, larger processors are less susceptible to things like bit flipping due to radiation, so that's also a plus.

Then too, not everything needs to be as small or as capable as a smartwatch.  Embedded controllers for example.  There are companies still making 8 bit MCUs

https://www.microcontrollertips.com/8-​bits-counting-8-bit-mcus-going-strong/​


If you're at all interested in radiation-hardened chips, look up RCA's (remember them?) "Silicon on Sapphire" product line. During the late 80's when I paid attention to such things, they were the gold standard.
 
2020-09-24 4:24:21 PM  
This thing isn't meant to be competitive.  It's a proof of concept.  That's why you fabricate something on an obsolete, cheap-ass process and put it in a super expensive ceramic/gold package -- you're doing a one-off or very small quantity production, probably wire bonding it by hand, to see if you've got your design process right.

If you want to produce things for real use, you're going to build it on a modern process (not necessarily super high resolution; microcontrollers often stick to larger features to reduce static leakage), push the clock speeds up, and stick it in a normal plastic package that doesn't cost more than the silicon inside it.  But that's semiconductor company work more than university lab work.
 
2020-09-24 4:43:38 PM  

maxheck: Ketchuponsteak: Well yes, but you can also purchase an Rasberry Pi.

Which uses a proprietary SOC developed by a British company that won't provide documentation unless you plan on buying 100,000+ units, and is waaaaay overkill for a lot of applications.

I love me some Atmel ATTiny processors. All the nifty of an Arduino, but $2.50 / per, and they run on microwatts. I keep finding new uses for them in widgets that would have taken 10 times the part count.

That, and India is probably a little less than happy using stuff produced by SMIC, and has every reason to develop their own foundries.


ARM is well documented, and no, its not a bad thing that its way more powerful than an more expensive chip.

They are well reasoned to develop their own foundries. Using the crap is just stupid.
 
2020-09-24 4:59:10 PM  
Fabbed using a 180nm process and named Moushik, the component uses the 32-bit Shakti E-class core and can run at between 75Mhz and 100MHz. Its motherboard has Arduino-compatible headers, so can work with various daughter-cards, and also has must-haves like GPIO and UART support. Those specs make it suited to IoT and embedded applications.

Meanwhile, the Arduino I've been playing with is 16 bit - 8MHz and I haven't shed any performance tears yet.

Right tools for the right purpose.
 
2020-09-24 5:40:03 PM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: [Fark user image 500x375]


Actually, I think that's from aan early IBM machine. 709?
 
2020-09-24 8:11:27 PM  
Yeah it's not going to be anybody's laptop but there are a million industrial applications that don't need a computer as powerful as a laptop.
 
2020-09-25 1:59:14 AM  

maxheck: Ketchuponsteak: Well yes, but you can also purchase an Rasberry Pi.

Which uses a proprietary SOC developed by a British company that won't provide documentation unless you plan on buying 100,000+ units, and is waaaaay overkill for a lot of applications.

I love me some Atmel ATTiny processors. All the nifty of an Arduino, but $2.50 / per, and they run on microwatts. I keep finding new uses for them in widgets that would have taken 10 times the part count.

That, and India is probably a little less than happy using stuff produced by SMIC, and has every reason to develop their own foundries.


Don't get me wrong, I own 4 Raspberry pi's and just turned my nephew on to one. But if India wants to set up a foundry, I'm all for it and hope they succeed wildly.
 
2020-09-25 12:49:50 PM  
"But the microprocessor is a few generations behind best practice and won't set the world on fire."

author needs a dictionary
 
2020-09-25 4:53:27 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: maxheck: Ketchuponsteak: Well yes, but you can also purchase an Rasberry Pi.

Which uses a proprietary SOC developed by a British company that won't provide documentation unless you plan on buying 100,000+ units, and is waaaaay overkill for a lot of applications.

I love me some Atmel ATTiny processors. All the nifty of an Arduino, but $2.50 / per, and they run on microwatts. I keep finding new uses for them in widgets that would have taken 10 times the part count.

That, and India is probably a little less than happy using stuff produced by SMIC, and has every reason to develop their own foundries.

ARM is well documented, and no, its not a bad thing that its way more powerful than an more expensive chip.

They are well reasoned to develop their own foundries. Using the crap is just stupid.


ARM cores are. ARM doesn't make chips.
 
2020-09-25 5:07:28 PM  

maxheck: Ketchuponsteak: maxheck: Ketchuponsteak: Well yes, but you can also purchase an Rasberry Pi.

Which uses a proprietary SOC developed by a British company that won't provide documentation unless you plan on buying 100,000+ units, and is waaaaay overkill for a lot of applications.

I love me some Atmel ATTiny processors. All the nifty of an Arduino, but $2.50 / per, and they run on microwatts. I keep finding new uses for them in widgets that would have taken 10 times the part count.

That, and India is probably a little less than happy using stuff produced by SMIC, and has every reason to develop their own foundries.

ARM is well documented, and no, its not a bad thing that its way more powerful than an more expensive chip.

They are well reasoned to develop their own foundries. Using the crap is just stupid.

ARM cores are. ARM doesn't make chips.


Its an ARM core, so well.
 
2020-09-25 5:12:56 PM  

maxheck: Ketchuponsteak: maxheck: Ketchuponsteak: Well yes, but you can also purchase an Rasberry Pi.

Which uses a proprietary SOC developed by a British company that won't provide documentation unless you plan on buying 100,000+ units, and is waaaaay overkill for a lot of applications.

I love me some Atmel ATTiny processors. All the nifty of an Arduino, but $2.50 / per, and they run on microwatts. I keep finding new uses for them in widgets that would have taken 10 times the part count.

That, and India is probably a little less than happy using stuff produced by SMIC, and has every reason to develop their own foundries.

ARM is well documented, and no, its not a bad thing that its way more powerful than an more expensive chip.

They are well reasoned to develop their own foundries. Using the crap is just stupid.

ARM cores are. ARM doesn't make chips.


To be a bit more explicitave, Broadcom licenses ARM core designs (openly documented) in the center to build their BCM line of processors, which are not documented at all unless you're shelling out big bucks.

I certainly don't blame India for wanting to set up an IOT chip foundry. They hate China more than Trump does.
 
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