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(Scientific American)   Turns out that fish bones are a very efficient way of consolidating trace elements into valuable rare earth minerals. Takes 34 million years, but I'm sure we can cut that back   (scientificamerican.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Rare earth element, Pacific Ocean, Chemical element, Fluorescent lamp, Antarctica, treasure trove of rare earth elements, fish fossils, Rare earth mineral  
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550 clicks; posted to Fandom » and Business » on 22 Sep 2020 at 11:01 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-09-22 11:07:48 PM  
"They calculated that the fossils are 34.4 million years old, and their concentration at the foot of Minami-tori-shima is a fluke result of the planetary cooling that generated the Antarctic ice sheet."

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2020-09-22 11:45:31 PM  
Fishbone - Party At Ground Zero
Youtube MJCaFe1yamg
 
2020-09-22 11:56:43 PM  
I've been tracking this US-sourced rare earth mine they are building in the sticks of Nebraska: http://www.niocorp.com/
 
2020-09-23 1:51:35 AM  
China to lay claim to the area in 3....2....1.....
 
2020-09-23 4:55:41 AM  
Roly poly fish bones.
 
2020-09-23 9:22:31 AM  

MetaDeth: I've been tracking this US-sourced rare earth mine they are building in the sticks of Nebraska: http://www.niocorp.com/


First fish bones, and now sticks.
 
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