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(Reuters)   *sips, swishes* "Hmmm, hints of Marlboro Reds with an undertone of Winstons and Salems and just the slightest hint of Camel. Almost like kissing your great aunt"   (reuters.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Wine, Heavy ground smoke, much smoke, tons of grapes, Fear of reputational risk, Hanson Vineyards, Viticulture, Poor air quality  
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640 clicks; posted to Food » on 22 Sep 2020 at 2:40 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



13 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-09-22 2:55:28 PM  
This was at a winery in Chelan, WA on Labor Day:

*Hack cough wheeze*

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-09-22 3:03:16 PM  
I'm only an hour or so from America's oldest winery, and there are more than a dozen even closer than that.

Shop Local!!
 
2020-09-22 3:52:03 PM  
My aunt smells like Swisher Sweets.

But point made.
 
2020-09-22 4:15:06 PM  
Not wine but whisky.

A friend of mine studied abroad at Edinburgh, and acquired a taste for Single Cask whisky.

Even single malts are blended from different casks of the same vintage to adjust for flavor and proof, but single casks are just that... straight from the aging cask to the bottle.  And each cask has its own distinct flavor and aroma.  So they name these casks based on the "personality" of the whisky inside.

He brought me a bottle with the name "Wet Chimney Sweep.  82 proof."

"Hahaha lol, let's try it and see..."

It was.  It had the distinct finish of the smell of pitch cleaned out of a chimney.

/we finished it
 
2020-09-22 7:19:50 PM  
So maybe some of you winos can help out a non wine person... Smokey beers and whiskys have been enjoyed for centuries. Surely some winemaker has come up with some libatious use for smoked out grapes. I'd think a smokey brandy could be quite amazing if done right.
 
2020-09-22 7:49:07 PM  

NINEv2: So maybe some of you winos can help out a non wine person... Smokey beers and whiskys have been enjoyed for centuries. Surely some winemaker has come up with some libatious use for smoked out grapes. I'd think a smokey brandy could be quite amazing if done right.


This all just sounds cancerous.
 
2020-09-22 10:42:44 PM  

NINEv2: So maybe some of you winos can help out a non wine person... Smokey beers and whiskys have been enjoyed for centuries. Surely some winemaker has come up with some libatious use for smoked out grapes. I'd think a smokey brandy could be quite amazing if done right.


Some varietals handle smoke better than others. I've had some smoke tainted Syrah that was amazing after putting down for 5+ years. Syrah already contains some of the compounds that are associated with smoke taint, so it's better equipped to handle the volatile reactions caused after smoke has penetrated the cell walls of the grapes.

Regarding a smokey brandy, the problem is that these volatile reactions don't necessarily create what you would recognize as a smokey flavor or aroma. The wine just tastes off. And by the time you've distilled it into brandy, there would be hardly any of that character left anyway, and you would have dumped a tremendous amount of time and resources into it that most wineries don't have.

/former winery worker
//this year sucks
///drink up
 
2020-09-22 11:29:50 PM  
Child. Cowboy killers, the taste of last night's booze and fresh coffee is the breakfast of champion
 
2020-09-22 11:40:11 PM  

Telephone Sanitizer Second Class: NINEv2: So maybe some of you winos can help out a non wine person... Smokey beers and whiskys have been enjoyed for centuries. Surely some winemaker has come up with some libatious use for smoked out grapes. I'd think a smokey brandy could be quite amazing if done right.

Some varietals handle smoke better than others. I've had some smoke tainted Syrah that was amazing after putting down for 5+ years. Syrah already contains some of the compounds that are associated with smoke taint, so it's better equipped to handle the volatile reactions caused after smoke has penetrated the cell walls of the grapes.

Regarding a smokey brandy, the problem is that these volatile reactions don't necessarily create what you would recognize as a smokey flavor or aroma. The wine just tastes off. And by the time you've distilled it into brandy, there would be hardly any of that character left anyway, and you would have dumped a tremendous amount of time and resources into it that most wineries don't have.

/former winery worker
//this year sucks
///drink up


Interesting. Thanks for the insight.
 
2020-09-23 12:37:35 AM  
Buy from Pennsylvania, we're (a rather distant) fourth on the production list.  There's a fair bit of decent dry and semi-dry wines being produced here these days.
 
2020-09-23 7:48:59 AM  
Just wait.
In twenty years, pretentionous douche canoes will be be gushy over what an amazing vintage 2020 was, and being condescending wankers to anyone who "can't appreciate" a "unique vintage".

Those wankers are worse than the "audiophiles" of the 1990s who hallucinated that they could hear a difference when they overpaid for their cables.
 
2020-09-23 10:59:18 AM  
I had a roommate 30 years ago who was a total dick. He had a habit, after we had a party, of going around and finishing beers that people had left. He'd actually get pissed at me for not doing it, too. It was with great joy that I witnessed him, more than once, get a can with a bunch of cigarette butts in it.
 
2020-09-23 1:26:46 PM  
Caddyshack cigarette drink vomit
Youtube sVTq0jBRWSA
 
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