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(Some Guy)   Taiwanese to vote for one of 18 new pork logos. Purpose is to distinguish untainted domestic pork from American-import pork containing ractopamine   (taiwannews.com.tw) divider line
    More: Obvious, Graphic design, Taipei, Taiwan pork logo selection, final winner, Selection, Taiwan News, Logo, shortlist of logo designs  
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388 clicks; posted to Food » on 22 Sep 2020 at 12:40 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



14 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-09-22 12:58:45 PM  
Ok, I can't resist.  How about...

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2020-09-22 1:19:42 PM  
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Just from an industrial design perspective, I think this one is probably best.

* It is monocolor, so it's easier to print
* The important text is large, so it's easy to read
* The logo has a large border, which allows it to be easily identified on a package
* The design is unique and unlikely to be confused with any other packaging logo

The other ones are prettier, but we don't need pretty for an industry label.
 
2020-09-22 1:30:54 PM  
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On the other hand, if the logo is going to be used as a supermarket sticker for meat, this one would definitely look better on the clear plastic wrap.

* It's shiny! It looks great under light and on the clear wrap
* It's round, so it can be easily stuck without any weird protrusions which can end up peeling or folding
 
2020-09-22 1:57:23 PM  
Just a reminder that the single largest producer of "American-import pork" is Smithfield Foods, a wholly-owned subsidiary of China-based WH Group.

Smithfield Foods, at over 1.3 million live sows, produces more pork than the next 8 biggest U.S. pork producers (Triumph Foods, Seaboard Foods, Iowa Select Farms, Prestage Farms, The Pipestone System, The Maschhoffs, Cargill, and Maxwell Foods) combined.

When you complain about things like ractopamine and gestation crates, you're talking about Smithfield Foods. Where Smithfield Foods goes, the entire U.S. pork industry follows, and their erosion of FDA guidelines around pork production have both cheapened pork & increased potential harm to its consumers.

Taiwan isn't looking to brand its pork to protect it from "American-import pork" - it's looking to protect it from Chinese pork that just happens to be imported to Taiwan from America. The "Made In U.S.A." bullshiat has been one of the best ways for American corporations to sell out to foreign interests over the last 30 years or so.
 
2020-09-22 2:29:17 PM  

We Ate the Necco Wafers: [Fark user image 366x362]
Just from an industrial design perspective, I think this one is probably best.

* It is monocolor, so it's easier to print
* The important text is large, so it's easy to read
* The logo has a large border, which allows it to be easily identified on a package
* The design is unique and unlikely to be confused with any other packaging logo

The other ones are prettier, but we don't need pretty for an industry label.


that one is freaking great design in restrained tradition and for so many practical reasons, as you mentioned. it would also be dead-easy to use as a dye-stamp on the meat itself, would really look pretty great.

what you said about those foil stickers for slapping on packaging, those are lovely as well and yeah the no sharp corners part.

also, the red from the one design and gold from the sticker, by including both (stamp the meat, sticker the package) and maybe throw in something like 囍猪, bam! (also huh I never noticed how the first letter in 'Taiwan' is kind of similar to the one in double-happiness)
 
2020-09-22 3:18:46 PM  

FormlessOne: Just a reminder that the single largest producer of "American-import pork" is Smithfield Foods, a wholly-owned subsidiary of China-based WH Group.

Smithfield Foods, at over 1.3 million live sows, produces more pork than the next 8 biggest U.S. pork producers (Triumph Foods, Seaboard Foods, Iowa Select Farms, Prestage Farms, The Pipestone System, The Maschhoffs, Cargill, and Maxwell Foods) combined.

When you complain about things like ractopamine and gestation crates, you're talking about Smithfield Foods. Where Smithfield Foods goes, the entire U.S. pork industry follows, and their erosion of FDA guidelines around pork production have both cheapened pork & increased potential harm to its consumers.

Taiwan isn't looking to brand its pork to protect it from "American-import pork" - it's looking to protect it from Chinese pork that just happens to be imported to Taiwan from America. The "Made In U.S.A." bullshiat has been one of the best ways for American corporations to sell out to foreign interests over the last 30 years or so.


At this point in the thread art critics outnumber social, animal health and industrial food safety 4 to 1. Just saying. Fark is schizophrenic.
 
2020-09-22 3:55:16 PM  

Urmuf Hamer: Fark is schizophrenic.


And frequently drunk.


/hic
 
2020-09-22 5:12:45 PM  

Urmuf Hamer: At this point in the thread art critics outnumber social, animal health and industrial food safety 4 to 1. Just saying. Fark is schizophrenic.


All part of the fun, though. You want fun? We partially privatized USDA pork inspections last year. Y'know, because we just wanna "help out" the USDA. Now, the fox is not only running the henhouse, but grading the goddamned chickens, too.

TBH, I agree with the Boobies from We Ate the Necco Wafers when it comes to the mark - the key thing for me is that that monocolor stamp, even if blurred through double or poor stamping, remains legible & recognizable. That stamp would work if it were marked directly onto skin or fat, like USDA inspection markings - it'd be cool if they worked that into their inspection process.
 
2020-09-22 6:50:27 PM  
Geez, I'm reading this and I think it would be a great thing for a doper like Lance Armstrong to use.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ractopa​m​ine
 
2020-09-22 6:51:43 PM  
Why do we have to make everything cheaper and less safe in the US?  Could we just raise pigs without adding crap to them to make them crappier?  Yeah yeah I know.
 
2020-09-22 9:51:03 PM  

FormlessOne: Urmuf Hamer: At this point in the thread art critics outnumber social, animal health and industrial food safety 4 to 1. Just saying. Fark is schizophrenic.

All part of the fun, though. You want fun? We partially privatized USDA pork inspections last year. Y'know, because we just wanna "help out" the USDA. Now, the fox is not only running the henhouse, but grading the goddamned chickens, too.

TBH, I agree with the Boobies from We Ate the Necco Wafers when it comes to the mark - the key thing for me is that that monocolor stamp, even if blurred through double or poor stamping, remains legible & recognizable. That stamp would work if it were marked directly onto skin or fat, like USDA inspection markings - it'd be cool if they worked that into their inspection process.


I love how the Fark filter caught the link text, but preserved the link itself... :)
 
2020-09-22 10:27:14 PM  

FormlessOne: I love how the Fark filter caught the link text, but preserved the link itself... :)


thought that was pretty funny too.
 
2020-09-23 10:21:12 AM  
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2020-09-23 4:57:32 PM  
Virtually all Canadian pork producers do not feed ractopamine to their pigs. The Canadian Food Inspection Agency (CFIA) certifies that pork exported from Canada originates from pigs that have never been fed and/or exposed to ractopamine
 
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