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(Huffington Post)   Look, you can do whatever you like when I'm no longer supporting you, Mom and Dad   (huffpost.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Family, High school, Johns Hopkins University, high school, end of the school year, 18-year-old Daniela, regular work, ZOOM  
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4183 clicks; posted to Main » on 22 Sep 2020 at 3:30 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



37 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-09-22 3:46:50 AM  
Speaking as a middle aged dude with Gen-Y stepkids, it's a pretty farked up world which won't do enough about climate change to guarantee my stepkids future kids the same opportunities I've had, but which will shut down vast sectors of the economy to protect folks a generation older than me from losing a few tired years off the end of their lives.

Conservatives hate young people. Climate change is "too expensive" to solve but wiping out entire industries (airlines, tourism, hospitality, entertainment) is fine because they're dominated by young workers.
 
2020-09-22 3:51:49 AM  
I am 4000 miles away from the US.

Is what is written in the article really a thing? I thought the US was a rich country.
 
2020-09-22 3:51:59 AM  

Aussie_As: Speaking as a middle aged dude with Gen-Y stepkids, it's a pretty farked up world which won't do enough about climate change to guarantee my stepkids future kids the same opportunities I've had, but which will shut down vast sectors of the economy to protect folks a generation older than me from losing a few tired years off the end of their lives.

Conservatives hate young people. Climate change is "too expensive" to solve but wiping out entire industries (airlines, tourism, hospitality, entertainment) is fine because they're dominated by young workers.


Yeah, that permanent lung and heart damage, only old people care about not wheezing while walking.
 
2020-09-22 3:52:56 AM  
...as a person who entered the country without documentation
Daniela - who shares her mother's immigration status...
The situation for families without immigration documentation...


Geez, the hoops journalists have to jump through...
 
2020-09-22 4:05:30 AM  

wickedragon: I am 4000 miles away from the US.

Is what is written in the article really a thing? I thought the US was a rich country.


The standard of living is fairly high, though there are many cracks in the social safety net through which people can fall.

The family in the article is in one of the most precarious positions because the mother is here without a visa and the father works construction which was shut down early on. If the father is also an immigrant here without a visa, both parents would be 1) ineligible to work legally and 2) ineligible to receive governmental assistance. When the economy went into lockdown in March, the jobs that the parents were doing were eliminated or severely reduced, and they don't have any way to rely on the social safety net because for them there isn't one.

There is a big question about what to do with families like this. The humanitarian thing would be to give them some sort of eligibility for public assistance, but there is a large contingent of Americans who would prefer to simply put families like this on a bus back to their home countries.

So yes, America is a rich country. We have lots of natural resources, good universities, the largest economy (this probably needs to be fact checked), and a business atmosphere that encourages entrepreneurism and rewards risk taking. If you can get on the right side of the line, America is a very comfortable place to live with lots of opportunity. If you are on the wrong side of the line, you'll struggle every day and experience high economic anxiety because you're barely making ends meet, if at all, and any unexpected expense could send you into a spiral towards destitution.
 
2020-09-22 4:12:10 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Too soon?
 
2020-09-22 4:20:04 AM  
Someone should let the Huffington Post know they don't need to use so many words when "illegal immigrant" will suffice.

Very interesting emotional piece though about a family that shouldn't even be in America having a tough time making it America.  Maybe we should also do some stories on people who carjack but then have to sit on cloth seats when they really wanted cooled-and-heated leather seats.  What about people that burglarize homes but find the interior design displeasing and the television too small?  There are so many other stories out there that must be told!
 
2020-09-22 4:24:14 AM  
This is a big pile of crap. The article, that is. Crap.
 
2020-09-22 4:27:31 AM  
I'm 62 now & still remember when I had a job at 13, cleaning my schools lunch tables $.50 an hour......Kids of today are nothing more than "Basement" dwellers playing video games instead of working or reading real letters.......(that's of course pre C-19)
 
2020-09-22 4:31:13 AM  

wickedragon: I am 4000 miles away from the US.

Is what is written in the article really a thing? I thought the US was a rich country.


It can happen to anyone. I did this from age 19-21... dropped out of college and supported my parents for 2 years when my dad had little work for 4 years because his entire area of expertise was being shipped overseas (textiles). He finally exhausted all his savings and unemployment benefits keeping a roof over our heads. We were 1 month away from being homeless, so I dropped out of school and got a 12 hour/day job in a factory, working swing shifts. Dad changed industries and eventually found work (at half of what he was making), but it was enough for me to resume college. This was thirty years ago.

My dad is 78 now. He is still working because he has to (he only has social security), and to this day he still doesn't make what he did in 1985 (in actual dollars, not inflation adjusted). He won't be able to do this much longer. I'll be supporting him again before long.

I know people who have had it way way way worse than me, so I'm definitely not complaining. Just explaining that yes, this is a thing.
 
2020-09-22 4:41:38 AM  
The main subject of this story, Daniela, seems to be an amazing, hard-working person who is doing everything she can to help her family and is still working to go to college.  Rather than pissing all over illegal immigrants, conservatives who are spouting out "immigrants are lazy criminals who should all be deported" should take a lesson from Daniela.
 
2020-09-22 5:28:47 AM  
I'm very fortunate to come from a stable background, but my college roommate was a first-gen college student who came from a very poor, rural family.  She was taking classes full-time and working an almost full-time waitressing job to help pay for school and send money back to her folks.  To help her out, I bought all the groceries for the house.  I also have a number of my current students in a similar boat.  This year, especially, it's bad.
 
2020-09-22 5:33:35 AM  

Freschel: [Fark user image 850x850]

Too soon?


Golly. It seems they had fancy dress in 1910. Whoulda thunk it?

https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/chi​l​d-coal-miner/
 
2020-09-22 5:34:28 AM  

neofonz: wickedragon: I am 4000 miles away from the US.

Is what is written in the article really a thing? I thought the US was a rich country.

It can happen to anyone. I did this from age 19-21... dropped out of college and supported my parents for 2 years when my dad had little work for 4 years because his entire area of expertise was being shipped overseas (textiles). He finally exhausted all his savings and unemployment benefits keeping a roof over our heads. We were 1 month away from being homeless, so I dropped out of school and got a 12 hour/day job in a factory, working swing shifts. Dad changed industries and eventually found work (at half of what he was making), but it was enough for me to resume college. This was thirty years ago.

My dad is 78 now. He is still working because he has to (he only has social security), and to this day he still doesn't make what he did in 1985 (in actual dollars, not inflation adjusted). He won't be able to do this much longer. I'll be supporting him again before long.

I know people who have had it way way way worse than me, so I'm definitely not complaining. Just explaining that yes, this is a thing.


Complain all you want as long as you're not using it as an excuse not to better things. "Silence gives consent". That story you said is complete bullshiat, and the fact other people have it worse than you should make you want to change things.
 
2020-09-22 6:15:00 AM  
Stories like this aren't new, but COVID may make them more common.

My cousin, in the early 90s, was the breadwinner for the family. He worked in a restaurant kitchen while going to school. Sometimes he'd have to skip school to work. His mom was disabled from MS and he had 3 other siblings. At 17, he was in a really, really bad car crash (while on his way to work, of course) that left him profoundly impaired to this day and back then and his mom was more worried about how she would pay bills than his health.
 
2020-09-22 6:50:49 AM  

mrinfoguy: This is a big pile of crap. The article, that is. Crap.


How so? Could you be more specific?
 
2020-09-22 6:51:17 AM  
Foe an "Info Guy" you don't actually supply very much info.
 
2020-09-22 6:58:29 AM  
I have some sympathy for the situation, but not enough that I think my taxes should pay for illegal immigrants to live a comfortable life.

If they had come to the US with the proper documentation, they would have had access to the needed services.
 
2020-09-22 7:17:28 AM  

Gramma: I have some sympathy for the situation, but not enough that I think my taxes should pay for illegal immigrants to live a comfortable life.


Your taxes don't bro, but your concern and talking point is noted.

Do you know what your taxes DO enable though?  Corporate welfare that make the rich...well...richer...without all that pesky 'work' that Daniela is doing.
 
2020-09-22 7:51:40 AM  

mcsiegs: Gramma: I have some sympathy for the situation, but not enough that I think my taxes should pay for illegal immigrants to live a comfortable life.

Your taxes don't bro, but your concern and talking point is noted.

Do you know what your taxes DO enable though?  Corporate welfare that make the rich...well...richer...without all that pesky 'work' that Daniela is doing.


They can knock that off too.
 
2020-09-22 8:09:04 AM  
I helped support my parents for the last 15 years of their lives and I'd do it again without a second thought.
 
2020-09-22 8:15:45 AM  

wickedragon: I am 4000 miles away from the US.

Is what is written in the article really a thing? I thought the US was a rich country.


I'm an afternoon drive away from the US and I'm still frequently dumbstruck by what happens there.
 
2020-09-22 8:34:17 AM  
I've met a good number of people who grew up dirt  poor, and worked as teens to support their families.  Some grew up at the tail end of the great depression in times of general economic distress, some had parents with mental/physical health problems. They span generations, from the great depression to the modern day.

For some of them, they eventually recover financially and make their way in the world, some are poor all their lives, some end up marrying into money.

We're in times of great economic distress, the idea of poor people, who work to support their elders hasn't changed at all, only the scale/the frequency has changed.  There are a lot more people in the situation now, much like a century ago.  All I can say is let's not repeat the mistakes of the past, let's not blame it on immigrants, let's not pull up the ladder behind us if we finally do make it out of poverty, let's help each other out as we're able to, and let's vote in laws that include a safety net for our most vulnerable.
 
2020-09-22 9:09:11 AM  

mcsiegs: Gramma: I have some sympathy for the situation, but not enough that I think my taxes should pay for illegal immigrants to live a comfortable life.

Your taxes don't bro, but your concern and talking point is noted.

Do you know what your taxes DO enable though?  Corporate welfare that make the rich...well...richer...without all that pesky 'work' that Daniela is doing.


I'm not on board with corporate welfare either.
I don't see any reason why kids can't help to support their parents. I've done it since I started my first job at 15.
 
2020-09-22 9:15:05 AM  

thatboyoverthere: neofonz: wickedragon: I am 4000 miles away from the US.

Is what is written in the article really a thing? I thought the US was a rich country.

It can happen to anyone. I did this from age 19-21... dropped out of college and supported my parents for 2 years when my dad had little work for 4 years because his entire area of expertise was being shipped overseas (textiles). He finally exhausted all his savings and unemployment benefits keeping a roof over our heads. We were 1 month away from being homeless, so I dropped out of school and got a 12 hour/day job in a factory, working swing shifts. Dad changed industries and eventually found work (at half of what he was making), but it was enough for me to resume college. This was thirty years ago.

My dad is 78 now. He is still working because he has to (he only has social security), and to this day he still doesn't make what he did in 1985 (in actual dollars, not inflation adjusted). He won't be able to do this much longer. I'll be supporting him again before long.

I know people who have had it way way way worse than me, so I'm definitely not complaining. Just explaining that yes, this is a thing.

Complain all you want as long as you're not using it as an excuse not to better things. "Silence gives consent". That story you said is complete bullshiat, and the fact other people have it worse than you should make you want to change things.


I think you might want to reread the post you replied to.  I don't think it says what you think it says.
 
2020-09-22 9:17:28 AM  

Interceptor1: I helped support my parents for the last 15 years of their lives and I'd do it again without a second thought.


I know that if I supported my parents for the last 15 years of their life, and then a few years later they came to me asking for more, I would definitely think twice about it.  Zombie parents should be able to support themselves.

/Sorry for your loss though
 
2020-09-22 9:29:41 AM  
It's not new. I went to an 'underprivileged' high school, and the kids that weren't on probation were usually working to support their parents. That was back in 2008.

Apparently everyone's cool with it.
 
2020-09-22 9:49:10 AM  

Gramma: mcsiegs: Gramma: I have some sympathy for the situation, but not enough that I think my taxes should pay for illegal immigrants to live a comfortable life.

Your taxes don't bro, but your concern and talking point is noted.

Do you know what your taxes DO enable though?  Corporate welfare that make the rich...well...richer...without all that pesky 'work' that Daniela is doing.

I'm not on board with corporate welfare either.
I don't see any reason why kids can't help to support their parents. I've done it since I started my first job at 15.


You can take that Commie sh*t straight back to China.
 
2020-09-22 10:19:56 AM  

orbister: Freschel: [Fark user image 850x850]

Too soon?

Golly. It seems they had fancy dress in 1910. Whoulda thunk it?

snopes.comView Full Size


"In sum, children did account for much of the labor force in mines in the 19th and early 20th centuries, with boys as young as 8 put to work in the country's many coal mines under grueling and dangerous conditions. But although the photograph seen above is from that era and reflective of its characteristics in a broad sense, it's merely a "cute" staged picture of a little boy dressed up with props and not a genuine snapshot of a child coal miner. "

Fark user imageView Full Size


"The work performed by breaker boys was hazardous. Breaker boys were forced to work without gloves so that they could better handle the slick coal. The slate, however, was sharp, and breaker boys would often leave work with their fingers cut and bleeding. Breaker boys sometimes also had their fingers amputated by the rapidly moving conveyor belts. Others lost feet, hands, arms, and legs as they moved among the machinery and became caught under conveyor belts or in gears. Many were crushed to death, their bodies retrieved from the gears of the machinery by supervisors only at the end of the working day. Others were caught in the rush of coal, and crushed to death or smothered. Dry coal would kick up so much dust that breaker boys sometimes wore lamps on their heads to see, and asthma and black lung disease were common. Coal was often washed to remove impurities, which created sulfuric acid. The acid burned the hands of the breaker boys. "
 
2020-09-22 10:22:47 AM  

Gramma: I have some sympathy for the situation, but not enough that I think my taxes should pay for illegal immigrants to live a comfortable life.

If they had come to the US with the proper documentation, they would have had access to the needed services.


Your taxes don't pay for illegal immigrants to live a comfortable life so it's time for you to celebrate. Immigrants are a net plus for the economy, putting more into it over time than they take out. Read some studies and rely less on resentment.

/been working since 12
//9 grandkids
///3
 
2020-09-22 10:25:37 AM  
I just find it hard to feel sorry for illegal aliens.
 
2020-09-22 11:26:44 AM  

barneyrubble: I just find it hard to feel sorry for illegal aliens.


I get that, but it's not really the kid's choice where they move as a kid (which is the entire basis of the DREAM thing).
 
2020-09-22 11:34:04 AM  

wickedragon: I am 4000 miles away from the US.

Is what is written in the article really a thing? I thought the US was a rich country.


Can I join you under the rock you've been hiding under for the past couple of decades?  Seems nice under there.

The US has been openly shiatting on the poor and Middle class for a couple of decades since the trickle down experiment went into place while blaming lack of success on moral failures and crappy work ethic despite proof of productivity skyrocketing while pay not only did not keep up with inflation, it went down.
 
2020-09-22 12:02:07 PM  
Yeah, that's not new. Saw a lot of that in '08 and adjacent years, too. Often it'd be a kid with aging parents/grandparents living off of SSI, and the kid making ends meet with whatever their min-wage part time job could pull in.

I've trained plenty of youngins for a job before who wouldn't know an honest day's work if it bit 'em in the ass, who subsequently wind up getting the door within a week or two, but more than a few folks in their early (I guess late, now that the last downturn is so far back) 20's have kicked their asses for years. The latter usually make a good addition to the office.
 
2020-09-22 2:33:06 PM  

thorpe: orbister: Freschel: [Fark user image 850x850]

Too soon?

Golly. It seems they had fancy dress in 1910. Whoulda thunk it?

"The work performed by breaker boys was hazardous. Breaker boys were forced to work without gloves so that they could better handle the slick coal. The slate, however, was sharp, and breaker boys would often leave work with their fingers cut and bleeding. Breaker boys sometimes also had their fingers amputated by the rapidly moving conveyor belts. Others lost feet, hands, arms, and legs as they moved among the machinery and became caught under conveyor belts or in gears. Many were crushed to death, their bodies retrieved from the gears of the machinery by supervisors only at the end of the working day. Others were caught in the rush of coal, and crushed to death or smothered. Dry coal would kick up so much dust that breaker boys sometimes wore lamps on their heads to see, and asthma and black lung disease were common. Coal was often washed to remove impurities, which created sulfuric acid. The acid burned the hands of the breaker boys. "


I only learned about breaker boys about two years ago when I went on a tour of a coal mine outside of Pittsburgh. I was depressed for the rest of the tour and to this day I look upon coal mine owners in a very bad light.
 
2020-09-22 3:22:05 PM  
Sure i guess:
FTA:
They Work Full Time. They Attend School. They're Only Teenagers.
They're living through a massive economic crisis, and their schools are facing total upheaval. Some teenagers are suddenly tasked with becoming their family's breadwinners.But then the pandemic did that to them, i grew up among kids that were just going to have to do that when they got old enough cause that is normal for plenty of Americans already.
 
2020-09-22 4:12:11 PM  

Interceptor1: and to this day I look upon coal mine owners in a very bad light


I grew up a little over an hour's drive from the Westray Mine.

My mother's side of the family is from Cape Breton.

There's never been a time in my life I understood why people voluntarily wanted to hang on to coal mining. It's an awful, awful business, even if it's your community's "heritage".

Like, when I have a shiat day at work, my go to is "It's better than coal mining".

Working Man-The Men Of The Deeps
Youtube v56DCcyGnec
 
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