Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Smithsonian Magazine)   Sure, cats are nice purring little fluffy things. But could you keep those damn psycho killers inside??   (smithsonianmag.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Cat, Cats, Pete Marra, author of the recent bookCat Wars, hates cats, Predation, head of theSmithsonian Migratory Bird Center, cats  
•       •       •

462 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 20 Sep 2020 at 10:53 PM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



48 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-09-20 7:10:58 PM  
Hey Pete, let's talk about the moral cost of humans. Pete? Pete?
 
2020-09-20 7:21:03 PM  
Lisa off........
 
2020-09-20 7:21:32 PM  
Piss off....

Autorrect, kiss my ass
 
2020-09-20 8:00:22 PM  
So what should we do about all the people feeding birds, deer and other wild animals leading to inflated populations? Live in a desert and see how many more birds there are around towns.
 
2020-09-20 9:20:54 PM  
Marra tells the story of Tibbles the cat, who traveled with her owner to an untouched island south of New Zealand in 1894. There, she single-pawedly caused the extinction of the Stephens Island wren, a small, flightless bird found only in that part of the world.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-09-20 9:26:54 PM  
I have 3 furry murder machines that are indoor only subby. They would absolutely decimate the local birdy population if I didn't. Especially this little pyscho pictured below who likes to treat my closet like his own personal forest.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-09-20 10:16:13 PM  

Alex_Lee: Hey Pete, let's talk about the moral cost of humans. Pete? Pete?


I came here to point out how dangerous humans are compared to cats, and most of them are allowed to go outside.  Occasionally.
 
2020-09-20 10:27:46 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: Alex_Lee: Hey Pete, let's talk about the moral cost of humans. Pete? Pete?

I came here to point out how dangerous humans are compared to cats, and most of them are allowed to go outside.  Occasionally.


Great minds...
 
2020-09-20 11:10:36 PM  
Our current batch of cats are strictly indoor. This was partially based on evil critters in our area that prey on cats plus ticks and fleas becoming a problem, but also because of the number of cute critter carcasses we found around the yard due to our last outdoor cat who lived to the age of 21 murderous years old. We figured we'd give the chipmunks, birds, squirrels and rabbits a chance to live life.
 
2020-09-20 11:41:29 PM  
Just tax outdoor cats out of existence.  Tax what you want less of.  If an outdoor cat is found on your property, have the government send the property owner a tax bill.  If the cat can be proven to be from another person, the owner of the cat has to pay 10x the tax.  Give people bounties to document and capture cats outside of homes.  If the cat is chipped or has an ID collar, and a cat bounty hunter captures the cat outside, give the bounty hunter half of the 10x tax.  And if a cat owner has an outdoor cat that is captured, all the other cats the person owns are euthanized.  in the person's home.  Then put in a blender a poured out onto the beds in the home and mushed into the couch seats.  And the kids must watch.  No crying.  If they cry they have to lick the blender clean.

Cat problem solved.
 
2020-09-20 11:48:31 PM  
The bird slaughter solution:
keep cats inside where there's a TV...?
Cat TV - A Video for Cats to Watch Garden Birds - 8 HOURS
Youtube fAQOSsbJW2Q

/ good grief - its a full day long !
 
2020-09-20 11:52:41 PM  

AmbassadorBooze: Just tax outdoor cats out of existence.  Tax what you want less of.  If an outdoor cat is found on your property, have the government send the property owner a tax bill.  If the cat can be proven to be from another person, the owner of the cat has to pay 10x the tax.  Give people bounties to document and capture cats outside of homes.  If the cat is chipped or has an ID collar, and a cat bounty hunter captures the cat outside, give the bounty hunter half of the 10x tax.  And if a cat owner has an outdoor cat that is captured, all the other cats the person owns are euthanized.  in the person's home.  Then put in a blender a poured out onto the beds in the home and mushed into the couch seats.  And the kids must watch.  No crying.  If they cry they have to lick the blender clean.

Cat problem solved.


Does this also apply to my neighbor's dogs barking at me whenever I go outside or in the middle of the night when the moon cast a shadow?
 
2020-09-21 12:00:36 AM  
Talking Heads - PsychoKiller
Youtube bM9SHDNAbPw


/dat bass line.
 
2020-09-21 12:09:58 AM  

PainInTheASP: Marra tells the story of Tibbles the cat, who traveled with her owner to an untouched island south of New Zealand in 1894. There, she single-pawedly caused the extinction of the Stephens Island wren, a small, flightless bird found only in that part of the world.

[Fark user image 451x475]


Tibbles lived the dream.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-09-21 12:18:36 AM  
His post cites an article from 2003 in the "Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association" that proved TNR works. In spite of that, "many ecologists say flatly that TNR doesn't work", a conclusion not backed by any specific reference.

He didn't need to go back to 2003 for the AVMA position. In 2014, AVMA performed a study of the effects of a TNR program found that animal control intake of cats per capita declined 70%. In the same county outside of the study area, cat intake per capita only declined by 13%.

In 2016, AVMA updated their policy to encourage the use of non-lethal strategies for free-roaming and feral cat populations, including the implementation of sterilization programs. TNR works!
 
2020-09-21 12:23:26 AM  

AmbassadorBooze: Just tax outdoor cats out of existence.  Tax what you want less of.  If an outdoor cat is found on your property, have the government send the property owner a tax bill.  If the cat can be proven to be from another person, the owner of the cat has to pay 10x the tax.  Give people bounties to document and capture cats outside of homes.  If the cat is chipped or has an ID collar, and a cat bounty hunter captures the cat outside, give the bounty hunter half of the 10x tax.  And if a cat owner has an outdoor cat that is captured, all the other cats the person owns are euthanized.  in the person's home.  Then put in a blender a poured out onto the beds in the home and mushed into the couch seats.  And the kids must watch.  No crying.  If they cry they have to lick the blender clean.

Cat problem solved.


You're trying too hard. The best clickbait trolls are subtle.
 
2020-09-21 12:34:41 AM  

NotCodger: His post cites an article from 2003 in the "Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association" that proved TNR works. In spite of that, "many ecologists say flatly that TNR doesn't work", a conclusion not backed by any specific reference.

He didn't need to go back to 2003 for the AVMA position. In 2014, AVMA performed a study of the effects of a TNR program found that animal control intake of cats per capita declined 70%. In the same county outside of the study area, cat intake per capita only declined by 13%.

In 2016, AVMA updated their policy to encourage the use of non-lethal strategies for free-roaming and feral cat populations, including the implementation of sterilization programs. TNR works!


TNR absolutely works!

Cats need to be kept inside.  Certain very feral cats won't have it, but in general, cats belong in the house.  Any vet will tell you it's better for their health.

So will anyone in rescue.

/I've seen some sh*t :(
 
2020-09-21 12:44:45 AM  
I keep my three spayed/neutered cats indoors because I love them.

People who let their cats outside do not love their animals and would prefer that they never come home one day.

It really is just that simple.

Indoor cats are safe from: cars, diseases, fighting with other cats and being injured, getting eaten by something (cats are not just predators, they are also prey animals), getting trapped somewhere and starving to death, along with a whole host of other potentially deadly mishaps.

I have had two outdoor cats. They were both rescues who had spent their whole lives outdoors before we took them into our home. Neither cat ever made even the slightest attempt to get back outdoors. Both cats, having tried to survive outside for several years, knew when they had it good. So if you think it's "cruel" to keep cats inside, pay attention to that bit, because my hubby thought the same thing until those two cats taught him better.

Spay and neuter your cats and KEEP THEM INSIDE!!!

Both they and the birds will thank you.
 
2020-09-21 12:47:50 AM  

SpaceMonkey-66: Piss off....

Autorrect, kiss my ass


I hate people when they're not polite.
 
2020-09-21 1:08:25 AM  
Around here, outdoor cats tend to become snacks for coyotes, so yeah, keep your pets indoors, please.
 
2020-09-21 1:21:28 AM  
There are a few areas in Australia that have banned outdoor cats. Every single one of them now has a rat problem. Rats will climb trees to eat bird eggs so the only real winners are the rats and pigeons.  Each pigeon tends to out compete about 100 native birds according to a Ornithologist I know.  It is almost like you can't win if you introduce new species to an area.
 
2020-09-21 1:56:25 AM  
I'd love for this to happen. However we can't even get people to stay indoors when there is a pandemic on. Some people are just incapable of seeing beyond their own priorities.
 
2020-09-21 2:02:18 AM  

AmbassadorBooze: Just tax outdoor cats out of existence.  Tax what you want less of.  If an outdoor cat is found on your property, have the government send the property owner a tax bill.  If the cat can be proven to be from another person, the owner of the cat has to pay 10x the tax.  Give people bounties to document and capture cats outside of homes.  If the cat is chipped or has an ID collar, and a cat bounty hunter captures the cat outside, give the bounty hunter half of the 10x tax.  And if a cat owner has an outdoor cat that is captured, all the other cats the person owns are euthanized.  in the person's home.  Then put in a blender a poured out onto the beds in the home and mushed into the couch seats.  And the kids must watch.  No crying.  If they cry they have to lick the blender clean.

Cat problem solved.


Impressive, around here people just shoot, shovel, and shut-up.
 
2020-09-21 2:13:20 AM  

AmbassadorBooze: Just tax outdoor cats out of existence.  Tax what you want less of.  If an outdoor cat is found on your property, have the government send the property owner a tax bill.  If the cat can be proven to be from another person, the owner of the cat has to pay 10x the tax.  Give people bounties to document and capture cats outside of homes.  If the cat is chipped or has an ID collar, and a cat bounty hunter captures the cat outside, give the bounty hunter half of the 10x tax.  And if a cat owner has an outdoor cat that is captured, all the other cats the person owns are euthanized.  in the person's home.  Then put in a blender a poured out onto the beds in the home and mushed into the couch seats.  And the kids must watch.  No crying.  If they cry they have to lick the blender clean.

Cat problem solved.


Replace 'cats' with 'children' and I'm in.
 
2020-09-21 2:40:41 AM  
Know what kills 50 million birds per year? Windows.
 
2020-09-21 3:43:50 AM  

nanim: The bird slaughter solution:
keep cats inside where there's a TV...?
[YouTube video: Cat TV - A Video for Cats to Watch Garden Birds - 8 HOURS]
/ good grief - its a full day long !


Mine doesn't buy it.  He knows they aren't real.  He just sits and waits by the door to go on his walk.

Leashed, of course.
 
2020-09-21 3:45:30 AM  

toddalmighty: Know what kills 50 million birds per year? Windows.


Windmill cancer
 
2020-09-21 4:18:39 AM  

silvervial: People who let their cats outside do not love their animals and would prefer that they never come home one day.


I agree with everything you said except this.
 
2020-09-21 4:51:41 AM  
We recently rescued a kitten from one of the feral colonies in the neighborhood. Plan is to keep him indoors.

No such luck with these two:
Fark user imageView Full Size


They are ferals that hang around the house. The one of the left, which I call Swipey, because she used to always demand blood sacrifice, was hanging around the house when we first looked at it. Sterling decided to stick around when we started feeding him separately because she got territorial about the porch.

We hope keeping them fed cuts down on how much damage they do to the birds etc. Either way, we took pity on their feral asses, and I feed them every day, provide them with water, and sometimes sneak some flea repellant onto Swipey. Swipey is almost tame, but won't let me pick her up. I can almost always pet her without her clawing me, as long as I'm sitting in the porch chair, but she has no interest in moving inside. We've tried inviting her in when we didn't have any other pets, no dice. Sterling has gotten to where we can pass within a few feet of hin when he's hanging out in the yard, but I don't expect him to ever get friendlier than that. He's a very wary feral.

I also built them both houses:
Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-09-21 5:42:52 AM  

AmbassadorBooze: Just tax outdoor cats out of existence.  Tax what you want less of.  If an outdoor cat is found on your property, have the government send the property owner a tax bill.  If the cat can be proven to be from another person, the owner of the cat has to pay 10x the tax.  Give people bounties to document and capture cats outside of homes.  If the cat is chipped or has an ID collar, and a cat bounty hunter captures the cat outside, give the bounty hunter half of the 10x tax.  And if a cat owner has an outdoor cat that is captured, all the other cats the person owns are euthanized.  in the person's home.  Then put in a blender a poured out onto the beds in the home and mushed into the couch seats.  And the kids must watch.  No crying.  If they cry they have to lick the blender clean.

Cat problem solved.


A single bullet is a lot cheaper
 
2020-09-21 5:47:42 AM  

Medic Zero: We recently rescued a kitten from one of the feral colonies in the neighborhood. Plan is to keep him indoors.

No such luck with these two:
[Fark user image image 843x516]

They are ferals that hang around the house. The one of the left, which I call Swipey, because she used to always demand blood sacrifice, was hanging around the house when we first looked at it. Sterling decided to stick around when we started feeding him separately because she got territorial about the porch.

We hope keeping them fed cuts down on how much damage they do to the birds etc. Either way, we took pity on their feral asses, and I feed them every day, provide them with water, and sometimes sneak some flea repellant onto Swipey. Swipey is almost tame, but won't let me pick her up. I can almost always pet her without her clawing me, as long as I'm sitting in the porch chair, but she has no interest in moving inside. We've tried inviting her in when we didn't have any other pets, no dice. Sterling has gotten to where we can pass within a few feet of hin when he's hanging out in the yard, but I don't expect him to ever get friendlier than that. He's a very wary feral.

I also built them both houses:
[Fark user image image 668x960]

[Fark user image image 850x696]

[Fark user image image 484x588]


You are ridiculously and drastically wrong.

Feeding them just creates an unnatural source of nutrition and encourages any other cats to collect and reproduce.  You're making the problem far worse.
 
2020-09-21 5:55:24 AM  

toddalmighty: Know what kills 50 million birds per year? Windows.


windmills
 
2020-09-21 6:38:01 AM  
Birds can fly. If a cat gets them, they suck at being aware. As far as chipmunks, moles, mice, rats, screw everyone of them. Rabbits, meh.
 
2020-09-21 7:53:43 AM  
My wife tried trap-neuter-release with two cats born in our yard. The fluffy little farkers didn't get the memo about releasing. 16 years later, one is still here (the other passed away).
 
2020-09-21 8:32:06 AM  
Our cat goes outside on occasion, but only 100% supervised and only for a short time. Otherwise, we have a covered patio with screened windows and doors to keep her in.

Our previous cat was started as an inside cat, but due to an incident where he was cut off from his litter box, began urinating on the outdoor carpet of our covered patio and wouldn't stop. So, he became an inside/outside cat and would use the yard rather than the carpet. Unfortunately for the bunnies, he did a number on them. He passed a decade ago and the bunnies have come roaring back. Never did kill many birds. He came limping back in one night looking like shiat. Found two big punctures on his back, like canines. He seemed to stick close to home after that. Wish we would have tried harder to re-box train him.
 
2020-09-21 9:59:10 AM  
The Atom Cat does not go outside.  One:  She's tiny and therefore a snack sized portion for the hawks/owls in our green neighborhood.  Two:  Any black bear she stumbles upon would consider her a nuisance.  Three:  She has more courage than survival skills.

The Atom Cat does not go outside.
 
2020-09-21 10:18:49 AM  
I miss my cats
 
2020-09-21 10:34:03 AM  

Medic Zero: We recently rescued a kitten from one of the feral colonies in the neighborhood. Plan is to keep him indoors.

No such luck with these two:
[Fark user image image 843x516]

They are ferals that hang around the house. The one of the left, which I call Swipey, because she used to always demand blood sacrifice, was hanging around the house when we first looked at it. Sterling decided to stick around when we started feeding him separately because she got territorial about the porch.

We hope keeping them fed cuts down on how much damage they do to the birds etc. Either way, we took pity on their feral asses, and I feed them every day, provide them with water, and sometimes sneak some flea repellant onto Swipey. Swipey is almost tame, but won't let me pick her up. I can almost always pet her without her clawing me, as long as I'm sitting in the porch chair, but she has no interest in moving inside. We've tried inviting her in when we didn't have any other pets, no dice. Sterling has gotten to where we can pass within a few feet of hin when he's hanging out in the yard, but I don't expect him to ever get friendlier than that. He's a very wary feral.

I also built them both houses:
[Fark user image image 668x960]

[Fark user image image 850x696]

[Fark user image image 484x588]


This is relevant to my interests. I posted in the Caturday thread last night about shelters for a couple of feral cats hanging around my place. Nice work!
 
2020-09-21 12:44:27 PM  

bfh0417: Birds can fly. If a cat gets them, they suck at being aware. As far as chipmunks, moles, mice, rats, screw everyone of them. Rabbits, meh.


This, this, this, this, this!!!  The birds referenced in the article were flightless birds - they were complacent when they decided to stay grounded, and got what they deserved.  All the ground crawlers you mentioned also carry all kinds of disease that are transmittable to humans.

And just remember kids, over 95% of all species that have ever wandered the Earth are now extinct.  It happens - move on and get over it.
 
2020-09-21 2:50:36 PM  

toddalmighty: Know what kills 50 million birds per year? Windows.


Look vista was bad buts let's not exaggerate here
 
2020-09-21 3:46:58 PM  

toddalmighty: Know what kills 50 million birds per year? Windows.


But that's only because no one buys Apple computers anymore, just iPhones.
 
2020-09-21 3:48:40 PM  

mathamagical: toddalmighty: Know what kills 50 million birds per year? Windows.

Look vista was bad buts let's not exaggerate here


I like that we went sort of the same route with that.
 
2020-09-21 4:01:43 PM  

Medic Zero: We recently rescued a kitten from one of the feral colonies in the neighborhood. Plan is to keep him indoors.

No such luck with these two:
[Fark user image image 843x516]

They are ferals that hang around the house. The one of the left, which I call Swipey, because she used to always demand blood sacrifice, was hanging around the house when we first looked at it. Sterling decided to stick around when we started feeding him separately because she got territorial about the porch.

We hope keeping them fed cuts down on how much damage they do to the birds etc. Either way, we took pity on their feral asses, and I feed them every day, provide them with water, and sometimes sneak some flea repellant onto Swipey. Swipey is almost tame, but won't let me pick her up. I can almost always pet her without her clawing me, as long as I'm sitting in the porch chair, but she has no interest in moving inside. We've tried inviting her in when we didn't have any other pets, no dice. Sterling has gotten to where we can pass within a few feet of hin when he's hanging out in the yard, but I don't expect him to ever get friendlier than that. He's a very wary feral.

I also built them both houses:
[Fark user image image 668x960]

[Fark user image image 850x696]

[Fark user image image 484x588]


Cats don't kill just for food. That's the problem. But if they're neutered, then barring euthanasia you've done all that can be done.
 
2020-09-21 4:03:00 PM  

DON.MAC: There are a few areas in Australia that have banned outdoor cats. Every single one of them now has a rat problem. Rats will climb trees to eat bird eggs so the only real winners are the rats and pigeons.  Each pigeon tends to out compete about 100 native birds according to a Ornithologist I know.  It is almost like you can't win if you introduce new species to an area.


Cats aren't actually very effective in hunting rats. They're better with grey or brown mice. House mice.
 
2020-09-21 5:31:36 PM  

AquaTatanka: Medic Zero: We recently rescued a kitten from one of the feral colonies in the neighborhood. Plan is to keep him indoors.

No such luck with these two:
[Fark user image image 843x516]

They are ferals that hang around the house. The one of the left, which I call Swipey, because she used to always demand blood sacrifice, was hanging around the house when we first looked at it. Sterling decided to stick around when we started feeding him separately because she got territorial about the porch.

We hope keeping them fed cuts down on how much damage they do to the birds etc. Either way, we took pity on their feral asses, and I feed them every day, provide them with water, and sometimes sneak some flea repellant onto Swipey. Swipey is almost tame, but won't let me pick her up. I can almost always pet her without her clawing me, as long as I'm sitting in the porch chair, but she has no interest in moving inside. We've tried inviting her in when we didn't have any other pets, no dice. Sterling has gotten to where we can pass within a few feet of hin when he's hanging out in the yard, but I don't expect him to ever get friendlier than that. He's a very wary feral.

I also built them both houses:
[Fark user image image 668x960]

[Fark user image image 850x696]

[Fark user image image 484x588]

You are ridiculously and drastically wrong.

Feeding them just creates an unnatural source of nutrition and encourages any other cats to collect and reproduce.  You're making the problem far worse.


They won't be reproducing, they were caught and spayed/neutered.
 
2020-09-21 5:32:48 PM  

Charmin Mao Tse-Bung: Medic Zero: We recently rescued a kitten from one of the feral colonies in the neighborhood. Plan is to keep him indoors.

No such luck with these two:
[Fark user image image 843x516]

They are ferals that hang around the house. The one of the left, which I call Swipey, because she used to always demand blood sacrifice, was hanging around the house when we first looked at it. Sterling decided to stick around when we started feeding him separately because she got territorial about the porch.

We hope keeping them fed cuts down on how much damage they do to the birds etc. Either way, we took pity on their feral asses, and I feed them every day, provide them with water, and sometimes sneak some flea repellant onto Swipey. Swipey is almost tame, but won't let me pick her up. I can almost always pet her without her clawing me, as long as I'm sitting in the porch chair, but she has no interest in moving inside. We've tried inviting her in when we didn't have any other pets, no dice. Sterling has gotten to where we can pass within a few feet of hin when he's hanging out in the yard, but I don't expect him to ever get friendlier than that. He's a very wary feral.

I also built them both houses:
[Fark user image image 668x960]

[Fark user image image 850x696]

[Fark user image image 484x588]

This is relevant to my interests. I posted in the Caturday thread last night about shelters for a couple of feral cats hanging around my place. Nice work!


Thanks!
 
2020-09-21 5:33:42 PM  

AquaTatanka: You are ridiculously and drastically wrong.

Feeding them just creates an unnatural source of nutrition and encourages any other cats to collect and reproduce.  You're making the problem far worse.


You are correct, but there's another horror factor to consider. Feral cats typically live 2-4 years in the "wild". Feeding feral cats increases their lifespan by at least double (4-8 years), plus increases their effective fully-mobile, fully-healthy, free-roaming murderkitty life. Older, sicker cats kill fewer animals (and rarely kill other than for predation). Healthy, younger cats kill for food more often than sick cats and are also far more likely to kill just because something twitched behind that bit of underbrush over there. Increasing the healthy lifespan of feral cats is contributing to the slaughter.

Also- as mentioned in TFA- feral cat colonies are essentially generated by human interference. This is not a natural cat grouping. Cats are generally solitary animals in the absence of human intervention. Clusters of feral cats only exist near human-provided food sources. Instead of a couple of puir moggies stopping by for a bite, you end up with a dozen or so creating an unnatural colony of remorseless killers with a stable food supply and nothing to do except fight and hunt to demonstrate internal colony dominance.

In North America, cats in the wild are trying to fill the ecological niches normally occupied by fox, possum, skunk, raccoon, martens/other weasels, and (to a lesser extent) that of bobcats and lynx. Note feral cats are not particularly as successful as the original niche predators, but they're doing the job because most of those original niche predators have been eliminated by humans. I'd far rather have ocelots, fox, and pine martens filling those predator niches than feral cats, but- even if a massive re-introduction program for all these predators were put in place- any such re-introduction program would have to work against "normal" environmental pressures AND the presence of human-supported colonies of feral cats.

Personally, I'd rather take all available steps to improve the situation without killing the animals, if possible. I like TNR programs. The small town in Texas where we lived had a really good one, and the combination of reduced breeding and competition with normal wildlife (coyotes, bobcats, etc) helped keep the feral cat population down.

Here in the Shallow South (where I live now), TNR programs are not permitted. Indeed, if I were to manage to trap a feral cat and take it to the local shelter to be neutered, I would have to take legal responsibility for the animal, pay for neutering and chipping, and have the animal released to me. If the animal were ever subsequently picked up by animal control (dead or alive), I would be fined for failing to keep control of "my cat". Then, there's the lovely stupidityness of only being allowed three (3) animal pets per household without incurring yet more fines. On the other hand, my senescent neighbor idiot is perfectly okay allowing seventeen generations of feral cats to be born and live in her back yard shed over the last ten years while complaining about how the kitties chase away all the birds.

We humans have caused this problem. We humans need to work at solving the problem. If we don't get a handle on feral cat populations by TNR or similar draw-down program, we'll be forced to start paying people for cat pelts to prevent the bloody things from mugging passers-by for gooshy food money.
 
2020-09-22 1:06:17 AM  

Social Justice Warlock: DON.MAC: There are a few areas in Australia that have banned outdoor cats. Every single one of them now has a rat problem. Rats will climb trees to eat bird eggs so the only real winners are the rats and pigeons.  Each pigeon tends to out compete about 100 native birds according to a Ornithologist I know.  It is almost like you can't win if you introduce new species to an area.

Cats aren't actually very effective in hunting rats. They're better with grey or brown mice. House mice.


The cats change the rat's behavior enough that it cuts into their breeding rates.
 
Displayed 48 of 48 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking





On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.