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(Some Guy)   If you were kind enough to give a decryption key to a hospital after targeting it with a ransomware attack, police would like another word with you. Seems somebody died because of it   (hotforsecurity.bitdefender.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Hospital, Cryptography, Key, Computer, The Hackers Conference, Paddy Chayefsky, Encryption, possible hacker attack  
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1486 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 19 Sep 2020 at 12:17 AM (18 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



23 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-09-19 12:24:49 AM  
Now that's a virus
 
2020-09-19 12:30:45 AM  
another?
 
2020-09-19 12:33:51 AM  
Ah, good old Citrix. When you want something 95% working. It's like swimming across 95% of the English channel - you farking drown.
 
2020-09-19 12:39:14 AM  

Russ1642: Ah, good old Citrix. When you want something 95% working. It's like swimming across 95% of the English channel - you farking drown.


At least it wasn't Lotus Notes on NT 3.51.
 
2020-09-19 12:51:05 AM  

OkieDookie: Russ1642: Ah, good old Citrix. When you want something 95% working. It's like swimming across 95% of the English channel - you farking drown.

At least it wasn't Lotus Notes on NT 3.51.


At least if it was Lotus Notes on NT it'd be harder to lock down.
 
2020-09-19 1:15:42 AM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: OkieDookie: Russ1642: Ah, good old Citrix. When you want something 95% working. It's like swimming across 95% of the English channel - you farking drown.

At least it wasn't Lotus Notes on NT 3.51.

At least if it was Lotus Notes on NT it'd be harder to lock down.


also the probability of infecting a system through a phishing email would be almost 0... given that it wouldn't be functional enough for people to actually receive messages.
 
2020-09-19 2:28:38 AM  
What I don't get is why in the living fark did they not just admit the woman (and others, I assume) and write the goddamn information down on paper until they got their network back under their control?
 
2020-09-19 4:07:29 AM  

khitsicker: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: OkieDookie: Russ1642: Ah, good old Citrix. When you want something 95% working. It's like swimming across 95% of the English channel - you farking drown.

At least it wasn't Lotus Notes on NT 3.51.

At least if it was Lotus Notes on NT it'd be harder to lock down.

also the probability of infecting a system through a phishing email would be almost 0... given that it wouldn't be functional enough for people to actually receive messages.


Was half the reason they threw up their hands and went to Netware at one job I had - the farking mail server used to give them more fits than all the rest of the shiat combined.
 
2020-09-19 4:44:27 AM  

KingBiefWhistle: What I don't get is why in the living fark did they not just admit the woman (and others, I assume) and write the goddamn information down on paper until they got their network back under their control?


Bureaucracy is humanity's greatest enemy.
 
2020-09-19 6:24:28 AM  
Suddenly Fark will be staunch supporters of the felony-murder rule.
 
2020-09-19 7:55:04 AM  

chrylis: Suddenly Fark will be staunch supporters of the felony-murder rule.


Probably wouldn't apply here anyway.  There's no intrinsically violent component to ransomware.  You could make an argument that doing it to a hospital could carry greater risk by disrupting the hospital's operation, but unless the ransomware was targeting actual medical equipment, that would appear to be too remote for FM to attach.  Normal issues with FM aside, expanding it that much would open a massive can of worms.
 
2020-09-19 8:23:36 AM  

Last Man on Earth: chrylis: Suddenly Fark will be staunch supporters of the felony-murder rule.

Probably wouldn't apply here anyway.  There's no intrinsically violent component to ransomware.  You could make an argument that doing it to a hospital could carry greater risk by disrupting the hospital's operation, but unless the ransomware was targeting actual medical equipment, that would appear to be too remote for FM to attach.  Normal issues with FM aside, expanding it that much would open a massive can of worms.


It depends if you could convince a judge and jury* of whether or not ransomware counts as robbery/burglary, or merely extortion.

/*only the judge in Germany
 
2020-09-19 9:06:24 AM  

Last Man on Earth: chrylis: Suddenly Fark will be staunch supporters of the felony-murder rule.

Probably wouldn't apply here anyway.  There's no intrinsically violent component to ransomware.  You could make an argument that doing it to a hospital could carry greater risk by disrupting the hospital's operation, but unless the ransomware was targeting actual medical equipment, that would appear to be too remote for FM to attach.  Normal issues with FM aside, expanding it that much would open a massive can of worms.


I don't think it has to be violent, just a felony.  People have gotten popped with it as getaway drivers for bank robbers.
 
2020-09-19 9:35:22 AM  

TheGreatGazoo: Last Man on Earth: chrylis: Suddenly Fark will be staunch supporters of the felony-murder rule.

Probably wouldn't apply here anyway.  There's no intrinsically violent component to ransomware.  You could make an argument that doing it to a hospital could carry greater risk by disrupting the hospital's operation, but unless the ransomware was targeting actual medical equipment, that would appear to be too remote for FM to attach.  Normal issues with FM aside, expanding it that much would open a massive can of worms.

I don't think it has to be violent, just a felony.  People have gotten popped with it as getaway drivers for bank robbers.


Every jurisdiction I can think of that has the FM rule at all does require the underlying felony to be some version of "inherently dangerous."  Bank robberies and other forms of robbery are considered inherently dangerous because they require physical confrontation (often/typically armed physical confrontation, and with banks, there are typically armed guards as well).  Being a getaway driver isn't violent in and of itself, but the getaway driver is still a co-conspirator to, and participant in, the underlying robbery.
 
2020-09-19 10:18:50 AM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: khitsicker: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: OkieDookie: Russ1642: Ah, good old Citrix. When you want something 95% working. It's like swimming across 95% of the English channel - you farking drown.

At least it wasn't Lotus Notes on NT 3.51.

At least if it was Lotus Notes on NT it'd be harder to lock down.

also the probability of infecting a system through a phishing email would be almost 0... given that it wouldn't be functional enough for people to actually receive messages.

Was half the reason they threw up their hands and went to Netware at one job I had - the farking mail server used to give them more fits than all the rest of the shiat combined.


I'm going to date myself, but here goes: When I started in IT, at a medium sized company, they used Netware for NOS (Groupware sucked), and Lotus Notes for email and applications. Users could open Notes, and with doclinks to the databases, could work all day without any other applications (there were some printer formatting problems, but there were usually workarounds for that). When a Notes server was taken down for patching, the users never noticed. Failover to another server was nearly instant.
When the company was purchased, the new IT people switched us over to Active Directory and Exchange. It took 10 years for the features and reliability to catch up. An Exchange failure could take 15 minutes to failover to another server, and it had many more servers, with much more horsepower than the Notes systems. They killed email on Notes, but kept the applications/databases for 15 years. Probably still have them. Converting them to MS would have cost them 10's of millions.
Notes was way ahead of it's time, but after Ray Ozzie left, and IBM bought it, they dropped the ball. Domino/Notes tried to compete with Exchange/Outlook on features and lipstick, and it lost out to the marketing excellence of Microsoft.
 
2020-09-19 10:28:22 AM  
Is the hospital admitting that if the power goes out they're going to lost all their patients?

I'm starting to wonder if we should be in a position where not having our records on paper is a risk to health?
 
2020-09-19 10:39:45 AM  

drewsfarkthrowaway: Is the hospital admitting that if the power goes out they're going to lost all their patients?

I'm starting to wonder if we should be in a position where not having our records on paper is a risk to health?


If you read the article they are claiming the person died as a result in a delay of care due to the hospital being on diversion and having to drive to the next closest hospital. I am sure all the patients in the hospital were fine with verbal orders and whatnot. However they would have had problems quickly seeing new patients. Going on diversion was likely the right choice.
 
2020-09-19 12:00:10 PM  

Some Junkie Cosmonaut: khitsicker: Some Junkie Cosmonaut: OkieDookie: Russ1642: Ah, good old Citrix. When you want something 95% working. It's like swimming across 95% of the English channel - you farking drown.

At least it wasn't Lotus Notes on NT 3.51.

At least if it was Lotus Notes on NT it'd be harder to lock down.

also the probability of infecting a system through a phishing email would be almost 0... given that it wouldn't be functional enough for people to actually receive messages.

Was half the reason they threw up their hands and went to Netware at one job I had - the farking mail server used to give them more fits than all the rest of the shiat combined.


Why does it always seem to be the mailserver that is the most problematic, seemingly everywhere? Its literally the easiest, best supported, and least hardware intensive part to implement of any business solution, but the hardest one to get anyone to allocate any resources to.
 
2020-09-19 1:07:08 PM  
Hospital administration and the employees who allowed the system to be compromised are responsible for the death.

I built my first pc in 1994 and have built over 100 since for myself and friends/family. I've been online since my first PC. I have downloaded more torrents and visited a hell of a lot more than my share of shady websites. In 26 years I've never had my pc infected with a virus or malware that had a negative effect on my system.

People get malware because they are ignorant of how to protect themselves and/or are just lazy and don't care. For the workplace it should be standard procedure to train anyone who uses the companies systems to safely use those systems without getting malware on the systems.

It's pretty easy to keep your system from getting infected. This isn't rocket science and there are plenty of simple, cheap (sometimes free) tools to protect your devices/network. This isn't the late 90s when a lot of people who had never touched a PC suddenly found themselves online and unprepared. By 2010 there shouldn't have been anybody ignorant of basic online security, especially in the workplace.
 
2020-09-19 2:22:29 PM  

Wesdog: I built my first pc in 1994 and have built over 100 since for myself and friends/family. I've been online since my first PC. I have downloaded more torrents and visited a hell of a lot more than my share of shady websites. In 26 years I've never had my pc infected with a virus or malware that had a negative effect on my system.


The difference there is that you don't have hundreds of non-IT savvy employees accessing your system daily.
Try that, and your perfect unbroken record would last about one lunch break.
 
2020-09-19 5:00:09 PM  
Thanks Bitcoin for making this possible.
 
2020-09-19 5:52:28 PM  

leeksfromchichis: KingBiefWhistle: What I don't get is why in the living fark did they not just admit the woman (and others, I assume) and write the goddamn information down on paper until they got their network back under their control?

Bureaucracy is humanity's greatest enemy.


If it happened in the US,I would guess liability concerns
 
2020-09-19 6:51:24 PM  

KingBiefWhistle: What I don't get is why in the living fark did they not just admit the woman (and others, I assume) and write the goddamn information down on paper until they got their network back under their control?


Having worked in admitting, I have the same question. There should be downtime procedures for this. IT took us offline for an hour or two at least once a month. Patients didn't stop showing up.
 
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