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(Vintage Everyday)   Nuclear test dummies in Boom Town - an awesome cover-band name or a Twilight Zone episode?   (vintag.es) divider line
    More: Creepy, Nuclear weapon, Atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, testing facilities' employees, wooden-frame homes, Mojave Desert, Nuclear fusion, Effects of nuclear explosions, Tsar Bomba  
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503 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 14 Sep 2020 at 1:32 PM (11 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-09-14 11:00:51 AM  
All that interest in blast effects. Better to die in the blast than slowly in the weeks that follow.
 
2020-09-14 1:35:58 PM  
Plutoniummm Mmm Mmm Mmm...
 
2020-09-14 1:43:19 PM  
Just crawl inside one of those solidly-built 1950s refrigerators and brace yourself for a nuclear-propelled ride. Right Indy?
 
2020-09-14 1:49:09 PM  
Is Nuketown still included in Call of Duty games or is it DLC-only now?
 
2020-09-14 2:02:58 PM  

Hills-Sachs_Legion: Just crawl inside one of those solidly-built 1950s refrigerators and brace yourself for a nuclear-propelled ride. Right Indy?


INDIANA JONES 4: CRYSTAL SKULL - NUKING THE FRIDGE (Reel Physics)
Youtube foUn_6W9N-Y


Yes, it would have worked, but not in the way envisioned on screen.

Especially since the largest tower shot in 1957 was the Smokey shot at 44 kilotons, just double that of Nagasaki.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Operati​o​n_Plumbbob
 
2020-09-14 2:22:24 PM  

edmo: All that interest in blast effects. Better to die in the blast than slowly in the weeks that follow.


All you need to do is get yourself about 3 feet underground, and mostly stay there for two weeks or so to survive it.  Packed dirt has a "halving thickness" of 3.6 inches, meaning that for every 3.6 inches, the amount of radiation that passes is cut in half.  So 36 inches, or 3 feet, would reduce radiation to 1/1,024th what you would receive on the surface.

Mostly, because as the radiation from fallout reduces itself due to the Seven-Ten Rule, you can start taking (short) trips outside to take care of things like garbage and waste removal, etc.
 
2020-09-14 2:48:26 PM  

dittybopper: stay there for two weeks or so to survive it


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2020-09-14 2:59:20 PM  
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2020-09-14 4:15:05 PM  

dittybopper: edmo: All that interest in blast effects. Better to die in the blast than slowly in the weeks that follow.

All you need to do is get yourself about 3 feet underground, and mostly stay there for two weeks or so to survive it.  Packed dirt has a "halving thickness" of 3.6 inches, meaning that for every 3.6 inches, the amount of radiation that passes is cut in half.  So 36 inches, or 3 feet, would reduce radiation to 1/1,024th what you would receive on the surface.

Mostly, because as the radiation from fallout reduces itself due to the Seven-Ten Rule, you can start taking (short) trips outside to take care of things like garbage and waste removal, etc.


It is certainly not ideal, for a lot of reasons to detailed to get into here, but there are actually some really solid plans for effective sheltering using just a typical suburban basement and object found around a household.
Knowing that most people would not plan for something until it was too late, designers during the cold war showed ways to make reasonably survivable shelters using the 'shadowing' effect of the vertical basement walls. Effectively knowing how to pick the correct basement wall and what things to take from around the house to build what looked like a very thick-walled child's play fort built with heavy things and things filled with water (books, hardwood, and water have similar halving distances), and you could do surprisingly well for two weeks, though not comfortably.
Survival rates short- and medium-term would probably actually rival those in proper shelters. Since air-handling was not even considered a viable option in those plans, long-term survival rates were probably not as good, but that's what you get for not thinking of doomsday until after the bombs go off.
 
2020-09-14 4:40:55 PM  
More 50's nuclear test dummies:

That Time Five Guys Volunteered to Stand at Ground Zero of a Nuclear Blast
Youtube XBMfCtyW9Pg
 
2020-09-14 5:17:17 PM  
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Did somebody say Boomtown??
 
2020-09-15 7:36:27 AM  

Dryad: dittybopper: edmo: All that interest in blast effects. Better to die in the blast than slowly in the weeks that follow.

All you need to do is get yourself about 3 feet underground, and mostly stay there for two weeks or so to survive it.  Packed dirt has a "halving thickness" of 3.6 inches, meaning that for every 3.6 inches, the amount of radiation that passes is cut in half.  So 36 inches, or 3 feet, would reduce radiation to 1/1,024th what you would receive on the surface.

Mostly, because as the radiation from fallout reduces itself due to the Seven-Ten Rule, you can start taking (short) trips outside to take care of things like garbage and waste removal, etc.

It is certainly not ideal, for a lot of reasons to detailed to get into here, but there are actually some really solid plans for effective sheltering using just a typical suburban basement and object found around a household.
Knowing that most people would not plan for something until it was too late, designers during the cold war showed ways to make reasonably survivable shelters using the 'shadowing' effect of the vertical basement walls. Effectively knowing how to pick the correct basement wall and what things to take from around the house to build what looked like a very thick-walled child's play fort built with heavy things and things filled with water (books, hardwood, and water have similar halving distances), and you could do surprisingly well for two weeks, though not comfortably.
Survival rates short- and medium-term would probably actually rival those in proper shelters. Since air-handling was not even considered a viable option in those plans, long-term survival rates were probably not as good, but that's what you get for not thinking of doomsday until after the bombs go off.


Yeah, well, this:

http://www.madisoncountyema.com/nwss.​p​df

The author argues that your advice isn't good.  It's better than *NOTHING*, but such shelters provide far less protection than the ones he describes.

Also, the shelters he describes can be built within a relatively short amount of time.  A couple of days of real effort (he had families do it, and they got a cash bonus if they could finish it within 48 hours).

He also argues that any such attack wouldn't be a "bolt out of the blue".  There would be a period of increasing tension before an attack, and anyone actually paying attention would have plenty of time to construct an adequate shelter.

I do have one caveat that's not mentioned in the book though:  It was distributed with the copyright that allowed it to be freely copied as long as it wasn't modified in any way.   So you can freely download it off the internet from any number of sources.

However, if you really believe you might need it at some point in the future, I suggest you get a paper copy.   I have one, but it was more because it was in the discount section of Barnes & Noble and it was a neat bit of 1980's Cold War kitsch, so I bought it.   However, there are some actual non-nuclear holocaust related survival info in that book, so it's worth having just for that.

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