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(NPR)   "Keep it up and I will turn this university around and NO ONE will get to be on campus this fall"   (npr.org) divider line
    More: Interesting, University, Campus, numbers of positive coronavirus cases, Academic term, students' movements, University of Illinois, press conference, mass coronavirus testing program  
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3314 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Sep 2020 at 9:04 PM (19 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



23 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-09-03 9:09:17 PM  
Putting the ILL in "Fighing ILLINI".
 
2020-09-03 9:14:55 PM  
Well, I for one am simply shocked that a dense layer of administrators' bet that throwing a bunch of people arriving at the confluence of youthful invincibility and the freedom of early adulthood before the impulse control sectors of their brains are fully developed would work out just fine didn't pay off, just like faculty, parents, and most of the medical and science community said it wouldn't. Shocked.
 
2020-09-03 9:15:52 PM  
Testing is great and wonderful and to defeat covid their needs to a be a lot of it.

However, It can't defeat the virus alone. People still have to do the other stuff and not be idiots.
 
2020-09-03 9:25:13 PM  
I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.
 
2020-09-03 9:27:12 PM  

Oysterman: I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.


That i$ a puzzlement.
 
2020-09-03 9:42:57 PM  

carkiller: Oysterman: I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.

That i$ a puzzlement.


They could charge just as much for distance learning. I think this is a combination of "I want a normal life the way it used to be" by the school system along with "Get the damn kids out of my house" by the parents. Either way it shows rigid thinking and a lack of adaptability.
 
2020-09-03 9:45:04 PM  

RedVentrue: carkiller: Oysterman: I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.

That i$ a puzzlement.

They could charge just as much for distance learning. I think this is a combination of "I want a normal life the way it used to be" by the school system along with "Get the damn kids out of my house" by the parents. Either way it shows rigid thinking and a lack of adaptability.


Also... if they go exclusive distance learning and it works... no forced dorm revenue. They might even require fewer administrative positions
 
2020-09-03 10:13:29 PM  
Good!  Nobody should be on campus this fall!!!
 
2020-09-03 10:23:22 PM  

DORMAMU: RedVentrue: carkiller: Oysterman: I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.

That i$ a puzzlement.

They could charge just as much for distance learning. I think this is a combination of "I want a normal life the way it used to be" by the school system along with "Get the damn kids out of my house" by the parents. Either way it shows rigid thinking and a lack of adaptability.

Also... if they go exclusive distance learning and it works... no forced dorm revenue. They might even require fewer administrative positions


And still have a big campus to maintain. And lose that sweet sports revenue.
 
2020-09-03 10:25:16 PM  

DORMAMU: RedVentrue: carkiller: Oysterman: I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.

That i$ a puzzlement.

They could charge just as much for distance learning. I think this is a combination of "I want a normal life the way it used to be" by the school system along with "Get the damn kids out of my house" by the parents. Either way it shows rigid thinking and a lack of adaptability.

Also... if they go exclusive distance learning and it works... no forced dorm revenue. They might even require fewer administrative positions


I wonder if virtual labs would work? Then there's sports. OK it's never gonna happen.
 
2020-09-03 10:30:21 PM  

DORMAMU: RedVentrue: carkiller: Oysterman: I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.

That i$ a puzzlement.

They could charge just as much for distance learning. I think this is a combination of "I want a normal life the way it used to be" by the school system along with "Get the damn kids out of my house" by the parents. Either way it shows rigid thinking and a lack of adaptability.

Also... if they go exclusive distance learning and it works... no forced dorm revenue. They might even require fewer administrative positions


There's also worry that students and/or parents will decide that online learning is subpar, and not enroll/return, which is a legitimate enough concern, but still not a reason to put lives in danger.

You're right on about the return to normalcy bit, though. State institutions in particular are vulnerable to politicians using us as props to show the public that they have everything under control. Of course, there's a huge economic motivation in that, too.

We've been able to hold the line against going back pretty well at my school, but Mgmt is starting to lean a little more heavily. It sucks. The students miss us and we miss the students, and I feel like I'm being some kind of alarmist here, but I just completely fail to see how it's worth the risk.
 
2020-09-03 10:40:05 PM  

carkiller: DORMAMU: RedVentrue: carkiller: Oysterman: I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.

That i$ a puzzlement.

They could charge just as much for distance learning. I think this is a combination of "I want a normal life the way it used to be" by the school system along with "Get the damn kids out of my house" by the parents. Either way it shows rigid thinking and a lack of adaptability.

Also... if they go exclusive distance learning and it works... no forced dorm revenue. They might even require fewer administrative positions

There's also worry that students and/or parents will decide that online learning is subpar, and not enroll/return, which is a legitimate enough concern, but still not a reason to put lives in danger.

You're right on about the return to normalcy bit, though. State institutions in particular are vulnerable to politicians using us as props to show the public that they have everything under control. Of course, there's a huge economic motivation in that, too.

We've been able to hold the line against going back pretty well at my school, but Mgmt is starting to lean a little more heavily. It sucks. The students miss us and we miss the students, and I feel like I'm being some kind of alarmist here, but I just completely fail to see how it's worth the risk.


You have to assume that staff and students aren't going to social distance, because enough of them aren't that it'll make social distancing useless in something the size and population of a school. A virus this infectious is impossible to contain.
 
2020-09-03 10:50:42 PM  
Despite Mass Testing, University Of Illinois Sees Coronavirus Cases Rise

Well there's yer problem right there. Just don't test and nobody has it. Problem solved.

PROBLEM SOLVEFFEF!
 
2020-09-03 11:01:52 PM  

RedVentrue: carkiller: DORMAMU: RedVentrue: carkiller: Oysterman: I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.

That i$ a puzzlement.

They could charge just as much for distance learning. I think this is a combination of "I want a normal life the way it used to be" by the school system along with "Get the damn kids out of my house" by the parents. Either way it shows rigid thinking and a lack of adaptability.

Also... if they go exclusive distance learning and it works... no forced dorm revenue. They might even require fewer administrative positions

There's also worry that students and/or parents will decide that online learning is subpar, and not enroll/return, which is a legitimate enough concern, but still not a reason to put lives in danger.

You're right on about the return to normalcy bit, though. State institutions in particular are vulnerable to politicians using us as props to show the public that they have everything under control. Of course, there's a huge economic motivation in that, too.

We've been able to hold the line against going back pretty well at my school, but Mgmt is starting to lean a little more heavily. It sucks. The students miss us and we miss the students, and I feel like I'm being some kind of alarmist here, but I just completely fail to see how it's worth the risk.

You have to assume that staff and students aren't going to social distance, because enough of them aren't that it'll make social distancing useless in something the size and population of a school. A virus this infectious is impossible to contain.


Yeah.

probably have an out under ADA (assuming it flutters bathetically enough when it gets run up the bureaucratic flagpole), but that just means increasing my colleagues' risk when they have to cover my shift,and that sucks, too. And as long as we're playing true confession around those particular campfire, the fact is I'm really not thriving in the work from home environment.  Just a bad scene no matter how I shuffle and cut the deck.
 
2020-09-03 11:11:16 PM  
Notice how people tout the number of daily tests but never mention the turnaround time on those tests.
 
2020-09-03 11:27:50 PM  

SimonElectric: Notice how people tout the number of daily tests but never mention the turnaround time on those tests.


Test results take a few hours. The test turn around time is always less than 24 hours

https://capitolnewsillinois.com/NEWS/​u​i-lab-approved-for-game-changer-covid-​19-test-but-timeline-for-widespread-us​e-is-unknown
 
2020-09-03 11:48:44 PM  

Oysterman: I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.


I guess they were counting on mass testing to catch hotspots before they spread.
 
2020-09-04 12:51:54 AM  

Oysterman: I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.


I think it ultimately comes down to expectations.  People were told "We shut down for a couple of weeks or a month then we go back to normal". Telling people that creates expectations. What people were told to expect didn't happen.

Good leadership would have told everyone from the start "We are shutting down and we are staying shut down until we have this under control". They would have said "THIS is the new normal, so we will adapt to it starting now." but this is an election year so we got told it would take a couple of weeks to a month then things would open up again.
 
2020-09-04 1:05:00 AM  
I work at ground zero in the Illini-Union. I do not find this amusing. Five student workers tested positive in the bookstore alone yesterday. Shut it down. Spend the day disinfecting. I'll be lucky to get out of this with just some sick days spent. :P--
 
2020-09-04 1:06:12 AM  

vinn01: SimonElectric: Notice how people tout the number of daily tests but never mention the turnaround time on those tests.

Test results take a few hours. The test turn around time is always less than 24 hours

https://capitolnewsillinois.com/NEWS/u​i-lab-approved-for-game-changer-covid-​19-test-but-timeline-for-widespread-us​e-is-unknown


Well at the start they were a few hours. Once the students got back they take about 24-30 and fail out fairly often..and some of the racks of test samples have gone missing.
 
2020-09-04 1:45:05 AM  

carkiller: RedVentrue: carkiller: DORMAMU: RedVentrue: carkiller: Oysterman: I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.

That i$ a puzzlement.

They could charge just as much for distance learning. I think this is a combination of "I want a normal life the way it used to be" by the school system along with "Get the damn kids out of my house" by the parents. Either way it shows rigid thinking and a lack of adaptability.

Also... if they go exclusive distance learning and it works... no forced dorm revenue. They might even require fewer administrative positions

There's also worry that students and/or parents will decide that online learning is subpar, and not enroll/return, which is a legitimate enough concern, but still not a reason to put lives in danger.

You're right on about the return to normalcy bit, though. State institutions in particular are vulnerable to politicians using us as props to show the public that they have everything under control. Of course, there's a huge economic motivation in that, too.

We've been able to hold the line against going back pretty well at my school, but Mgmt is starting to lean a little more heavily. It sucks. The students miss us and we miss the students, and I feel like I'm being some kind of alarmist here, but I just completely fail to see how it's worth the risk.

You have to assume that staff and students aren't going to social distance, because enough of them aren't that it'll make social distancing useless in something the size and population of a school. A virus this infectious is impossible to contain.

Yeah.

I probably have an out under ADA (assuming it flutters bathetically enough when it gets run up the bureaucratic flagpole), but that just means increasing my colleagues' risk when they have to cover my shift,and that sucks, too. And as long as we're playing t ...


Yeah. We live in interesting times.
 
2020-09-04 1:48:48 AM  

Ambitwistor: Oysterman: I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.

I guess they were counting on mass testing to catch hotspots before they spread.


As fast as people get around today that was never going to work. One hotspot becomes a hundred before it even becomes apparent.
 
2020-09-04 6:59:45 PM  

Oysterman: I'm still trying to wrap my head around how everyone knew it was a good idea to shut down in the Spring semester, yet now is for some reason opposed to that despite even more active cases in the Fall semester.


Well, I can't speak for every university, but here are some differences between Spring and Fall at the one I've been paying attention to:

- All classrooms redesigned for maximum spacing (including rotating online-only schedules so that no classroom is ever filled to capacity) and with plastic shields in some places
- Free coronavirus test for any student who wants one
- Mandatory coronavirus tests for randomly selected students
- Masks widely available and now mandatory
- Hand sanitizer dispensers installed throughout campus
- A top-down contact tracing system in place
- Staggered meal times at the dining halls, with takeout service for those who wish to eat at a different time
- One dormitory that had been scheduled for summer demolition, now set aside for student isolation
- A nearby hotel also reserved for student quarantine (a lower level than isolation; generally, those identified through the contract tracing system)
- Temperature checks at building entrances
- A mandatory online questionnaire for every student, every day (with access to buildings denied if questionnaire has not been completed)
- Limits on social gatherings, with threat of suspension or dismissal
- About 30% of the student body opting to go online only, which reduces crowding
- No students allowed to attend sporting events, no exceptions
- A blanket prohibition on dorm visitors (e.g., students who live in other dorms, or parents)
- A predetermined set of criteria that would dictate shutting campus down, with a public online dashboard for all to monitor

You may now return to the regularly scheduled discussion of how all university administrators are a bunch of bungling fools.
 
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