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(Oregon Live)   Man brings arrows to an antler fight, loses   (oregonlive.com) divider line
    More: Sad, Property, Internet privacy, Elk, Oregon State Police, Mark David, KILL, Oregon, Privacy  
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3161 clicks; posted to Main » on 31 Aug 2020 at 6:17 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-08-31 12:48:50 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-31 1:21:19 AM  
If you really analyze hunting, it is a fight to the death. Of course it's a fight that the prey doesn't really know it's involved in until it's too late most of the time. A fight that is almost always skewed in the human's favor by their choice of weapon.

The elk won this one.

/it's still dead of course
//and being cooked for inmates
///still won
 
2020-08-31 1:33:36 AM  
Elk aren't bear or moose, but my understanding is that it's not unwise to bring a firearm if you're hunting one with bow an arrow, just in case of this very scenario.
 
2020-08-31 1:38:05 AM  
Well, I can respect the hunter for fighting on a slightly more even terms.
 
2020-08-31 2:05:26 AM  
I respect his choice in weapon. It's not a spear but this shows it was still a fair fight
 
2020-08-31 3:03:32 AM  
i.imgflip.comView Full Size
 
2020-08-31 3:45:23 AM  
my friend-in-high-school's mom was killed when she hit an elk while driving. the head came through the windshield after the car swept the legs and mortally injured it and in its death throes it gored her to death with its antlers.
 
2020-08-31 6:25:25 AM  
Did he also have a theory about dinosaurs?
 
2020-08-31 6:35:31 AM  

wademh: [i.imgflip.com image 500x740]


Welllll...that depends. I dnrtfa so not sure. If he was a trophy or 'sportsman' hunter. Then yes, got what he was gonna try to give. But for many people, including mine, hunting is a way to put food on the table. One buck can provide many pounds of venison for a family of modest income. Not likely in play here, but also protecting gardens which also feed families.
 
2020-08-31 6:42:37 AM  
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2020-08-31 7:16:16 AM  

Calypsocookie: If you really analyze hunting, it is a fight to the death. Of course it's a fight that the prey doesn't really know it's involved in until it's too late most of the time.


That's absolutely not true.   Animals like elk, moose, deer, etc. evolved as prey animals.   They spend their entire lives living out that fight, even in the absence of Man.

There is a reason why those animals aren't slow and dumb like cows.  It's because they evolved to evade predators.

If they didn't know they were involved in that fight (and I'm using "know" loosely here like you are), then they'd have completely different behaviors.   They wouldn't run at the slightest odd sound in the woods.  They wouldn't avoid things that smell like humans.  They wouldn't be concerned at the appearance of an odd two-legged creature.

And you can see that shift in behavior sometimes in places where the animals aren't hunted.   In parks where they have been protected for long periods of time, the sight of a human, even relatively close, doesn't spook them.  That's why people have to be careful in places like Yellowstone, because an 800 lb elk that isn't afraid of being killed by a human won't run away from them, but if you get too close, it can attack if it suddenly decides you are a threat.
 
2020-08-31 7:17:34 AM  
Hunter killed by prey, I feel really bad for the hunter . . . said no one ever.
 
2020-08-31 7:21:40 AM  
I think there's a level of risk that you take on in being a hunter.

Normally hunters mitigate the risk by being up a tree when hunting, and you don't expect your prey to actually live long enough to kill you when you get down.

That said, if you're a varmint hunter, the worst you need to worry about is nibbles and possibly rabies.
 
2020-08-31 7:27:04 AM  

MagicChicken: Normally hunters mitigate the risk by being up a tree when hunting, and you don't expect your prey to actually live long enough to kill you when you get down.


You mitigate the risk by being aware that a wounded animal is incredibly dangerous and you make sure it is dead before you get close that's something every new hunter is taught. This guy made the mistake of assuming an elk he shot with an arrow the night before (prime example of how non-hunters considering bows to be more virtuous are wrong) would be dead when he tracked it in the morning. Props to him for actually following up in the morning since many assholes wouldn't but he was careless.
 
2020-08-31 7:33:12 AM  
Mike Royko wrote a column I'm thinking in the 70's that never left me. He said hunting is not a sport. In sports all the players use the same equipment, and as mentioned upthread, understand that they're playing. There's nothing sporting about hiding in the woods and sniping at an animal with an expensive weapon you couldn't even build yourself.

Real sportsmen would use the tools of the hunted. If you chase down a deer, I'm impressed by your manliness. If you drop out of a tree and rip out the jugular of a boar with your teeth, I'm impressed. If you maul a bear, I'm strongly impressed by your manliness. And I'm impressed by your guile if you sneak up on a bird. I'll listen to arguments about feeding families and donating excess meat to shelters as many say, and I'll buy the argument that the prey live and die a better death than the meat we buy at the market or than the prey would have died in the wild--but I am not impressed at all by the sport of it. Just have to smile when a hunter is outsmarted by a wild animal.
 
2020-08-31 7:34:46 AM  
Why the f*ck do these assholes shoot an 800-pound animal with an arrow? It's a horrific, slow and tortuous way for a large animal to die, not to mention loads of work tracking the thing after you "stick" it. A bull elk is an animal that's real easy to get close to, providing a clean shot with a high-powered rifle.
 
2020-08-31 7:39:41 AM  

chucknasty: my friend-in-high-school's mom was killed when she hit an elk while driving. the head came through the windshield after the car swept the legs and mortally injured it and in its death throes it gored her to death with its antlers.


Well.
 
2020-08-31 7:39:43 AM  
Sagg Shootin' His Arrow (Live)
Youtube 4LELuQeLJus
 
2020-08-31 7:56:02 AM  

Serious Post on Serious Thread: wademh: [i.imgflip.com image 500x740]

Welllll...that depends. I dnrtfa so not sure. If he was a trophy or 'sportsman' hunter. Then yes, got what he was gonna try to give. But for many people, including mine, hunting is a way to put food on the table. One buck can provide many pounds of venison for a family of modest income. Not likely in play here, but also protecting gardens which also feed families.


You're absolutely wrong in the way you feel about that.

There are 3 kinds of hunting:

1.  Subsistence hunting.  This is hunting for food, and in some cases to protect crops, but the main objective of it is to fill your belly and those of your family.

2.  Market hunting.   This is hunting because you are going to sell the parts of the animals you've killed for a profit.  I think the biggest example you will find today is commercial fishing, but it was once very common for hunting to be motivated by profit.  Note that this can be legal, or illegal, and the market can be the government (ie., they pay a bounty for killing predators like wolves).

3.  Sport hunting.  This can also involve eating the animal, or simply looking for a better trophy, but the main purpose isn't to survive either through eating or selling the animal, it's hunting because you enjoy it.

History has shown that the first two cases are the real threat to species.  Someone just trying to feed his kids isn't going to care that the left-hand Agouti he just shot is an endangered species, he just wants to live and for his kids to live.

Similarly, someone who is poaching elephants for their tusks, rhinos for their horns, and big cats for their various parts to make Traditional Chinese Viagra isn't going to care about how endangered the animals are.  They just want to make some money to feed themselves and their kids.

Sport hunters, on the other hand, welcome things like bag limits, limited seasons, restrictions on the kind of equipment they can use, and all the other laws that go with them.   In fact, it was sport hunters who saved big game in North America.   Prior to the 1900's, it was perfectly legal to go out hunting for economic purposes and subsistence in the United States, and there were no legal restrictions on doing that.

As a result, the whitetail deer population in the US plummeted to extremely low levels:

Fark user imageView Full Size


It was estimated that in 1900 the total US Whitetail Deer population was fewer than 500,000, just 1/60th of what it had been in pre-Columbian times.  That fall was due to not just market hunting, but also to subsistence hunting by settlers reaching farther across the continent.

In fact, you can even see evidence of it in technology.  In Appalachia in the mid 18th Century, the typical locally made rifle was typically .50" or .54".  As the larger species of game like elk and bear disappeared through market and subsistence hunting, the caliber was reduced to .40" or .45" caliber, and as the deer were all killed off, the guns fell into "small game" calibers of .32" and .36" because that's pretty much all that was left*.  Raccoons, squirrels, rabbits, opossum, and you'd have to kill the occasional hog or sow.

Sport hunting, though, brought all of those game species back.  I know it sounds paradoxical, but it has a certain logic to it.  People who enjoy hunting want to keep on hunting, and the best way to do that is to protect the species they hunt from unregulated hunting.  So market hunting and unregulated subsistence hunting were banned in the United States.   You can't go out and hunt deer and sell the hides for profit.   Any buckskin you buy is from farmed deer.  You can't just go out and hunt for food without government permission**.

In fact, I've gone hunting a few times with actual trophy hunters.   Guys whose only goal is to find a deer with a more impressive rack than the ones they have on their walls.   I've seen them pass up deer I absolutely would have shot. Why did they pass it up?  Because "It was only a six pointer".   That's a direct quote.   If you're asking why I didn't shoot, it's because I only hunt primitive (wooden longbow, or flintlock rifle), and that particular deer was far outside of my range.  I saw it pass close by his tree stand though.

It's the trophy hunters who are circumspect about what they shoot.    They're the ones who speed a ton of money on gear, some of which has an 11% federal excise tax on it that goes to wildlife preservation.  They're the ones who work to preserve wild habitat for the game animals they hunt, which also preserves those areas for non-game species.

You want to preserve a species? Get sport hunters involved in it.  They'll take too few animals to make a difference in the species, and they'll pump huge amounts of cash into preservation so they can keep hunting.


*Muzzleloaders, especially round ball shooting guns, have larger calibers than modern guns for the same purpose because of their inefficiency.  So you wouldn't hunt squirrels today with a .30" caliber modern rifle, but a .32" muzzleloader is perfect for hunting squirrels.

**Though I did know a family in the Adirondacks who did that when I was a kid.  The local game wardens knew it was going on, but turned a blind eye as long as they were discreet about it.  The family was dirt poor and putting mom and dad in jail or fining them would only make the situation worse.  The family always took a couple more deer than their tags would allow, and occasionally did it out of season, but only what they needed.
 
2020-08-31 7:56:24 AM  

jimjays: Mike Royko wrote a column I'm thinking in the 70's that never left me. He said hunting is not a sport. In sports all the players use the same equipment, and as mentioned upthread, understand that they're playing. There's nothing sporting about hiding in the woods and sniping at an animal with an expensive weapon you couldn't even build yourself.

Real sportsmen would use the tools of the hunted. If you chase down a deer, I'm impressed by your manliness. If you drop out of a tree and rip out the jugular of a boar with your teeth, I'm impressed. If you maul a bear, I'm strongly impressed by your manliness. And I'm impressed by your guile if you sneak up on a bird. I'll listen to arguments about feeding families and donating excess meat to shelters as many say, and I'll buy the argument that the prey live and die a better death than the meat we buy at the market or than the prey would have died in the wild--but I am not impressed at all by the sport of it. Just have to smile when a hunter is outsmarted by a wild animal.


i miss mike.  used to read him everyday when his column was in the paper.  according to the story the meat was donated--does that include the hunter?
 
2020-08-31 7:56:36 AM  
Based on the comments so far, it's no surprise why many of you despise your fellow human
 
2020-08-31 7:59:17 AM  

Zeb Hesselgresser: Hunter killed by prey, I feel really bad for the hunter . . . said no one ever.


Oh, I didn't know you were a vegan.
 
2020-08-31 8:08:15 AM  

dittybopper: Zeb Hesselgresser: Hunter killed by prey, I feel really bad for the hunter . . . said no one ever.

Oh, I didn't know you were a vegan.


Absolutely not.  I love a good steak/pork chop.  I don't think rooting for the bears during bear season is a contradiction.  I don't have malice for nor do I look down on hunters.  I was one.  It's more of a fair is fair thing.
 
2020-08-31 8:08:30 AM  
I was out in the middle of nowhere taking pictures  of the Milky Way, that's when I heard the mournful  high pitched wail along with a lower pitched tone. It scared the hell out of me at first. I realized after a few seconds it was the elk calling.

Now I kind of miss it when I'm out there and I don't hear it.

Listen: These Elk Sound Terrifying, Like Ringwraiths | National Geographic
Youtube vmlN5W6CWs8
 
2020-08-31 8:11:13 AM  
Sad tag? Yes, sad for the elk.
 
2020-08-31 8:14:29 AM  

jimjays: Just have to smile when a hunter is outsmarted by a wild animal.


Got it, people who do things you don't agree with aren't really people, so their death is a source of amusement to you.

Regardless of how you slice it, attitudes like that on both sides are why we're having the issues we're having right now.

I mean, I think that you probably didn't expect someone to call you on your absolutely *APPALLING* post, figuring this would be an echo chamber where you could say what you wanted and you wouldn't get any push back because all "right thinking" individuals agree with you.  That's why you felt comfortable with such a deplorable statement.

It's not like this guy was hunting with a high-powered scoped rifle hundreds of yards away.  He was archery hunting, and like a responsible hunter after he shot the elk the previous evening and couldn't locate it* he was going back the next morning to find it.   He was again carrying a bow and arrow.   He found the elk, it wasn't quite dead yet, and it attacked him, killing him.

That you find that amusing is disgusting to me.

*It's hard to follow a blood trail in the dark.  If you end up shooting an animal in the evening before legal shooting time ends, and you wait the usual time so you don't "push" the animal, it's usually better to go back in the morning with good light and find it.
 
2020-08-31 8:14:47 AM  
Hey you can't blame it for extracting revenge. It sounds like the Elk gave him a swifter more humane death than he tried to give the Elk. It's not like the Elk gored him then went looking to finish the job the next morning. If someone kills me I hope to be able to take them with me.
 
2020-08-31 8:15:55 AM  
If you hunt for sport you are scum.

If you say you hunt for food but you use a bow then you are hunting for sport.

If you say you hunt for food but you keep trophies then you are hunting for sport.
 
2020-08-31 8:17:40 AM  

Zeb Hesselgresser: dittybopper: Zeb Hesselgresser: Hunter killed by prey, I feel really bad for the hunter . . . said no one ever.

Oh, I didn't know you were a vegan.

Absolutely not.  I love a good steak/pork chop.  I don't think rooting for the bears during bear season is a contradiction.  I don't have malice for nor do I look down on hunters.  I was one.  It's more of a fair is fair thing.


Ask yourself this question:  Is that how "I feel really bad for the hunter...  said no one ever." comes across?
 
2020-08-31 8:18:40 AM  
When you come at the king, you best not miss.
 
2020-08-31 8:28:26 AM  
James Brown - Payback
Youtube istJXUJJP0g
 
2020-08-31 8:31:17 AM  

Jackal_N: [Fark user image image 425x639]


Well it is...

*Sunglasses*


...2020
 
2020-08-31 8:32:04 AM  

sithon: I respect his choice in weapon. It's not a spear but this shows it was still a fair fight


it's not about it being fair.  this isn't some sort of gladiatorial sport-fighting for show.  If you are going hunting it is your job to make it as unfair as possible so that it ends as quickly as possible. Can you take a bull elk with a bow? sure if you are skilled, practiced, are careful with your shot selection and nothing goes wrong.  same thing with a rifle but the margin for error with a bow is far lower.
 
2020-08-31 8:32:45 AM  

dittybopper: jimjays: Just have to smile when a hunter is outsmarted by a wild animal.

Got it, people who do things you don't agree with aren't really people, so their death is a source of amusement to you.

Regardless of how you slice it, attitudes like that on both sides are why we're having the issues we're having right now.

I mean, I think that you probably didn't expect someone to call you on your absolutely *APPALLING* post, figuring this would be an echo chamber where you could say what you wanted and you wouldn't get any push back because all "right thinking" individuals agree with you.  That's why you felt comfortable with such a deplorable statement.

It's not like this guy was hunting with a high-powered scoped rifle hundreds of yards away.  He was archery hunting, and like a responsible hunter after he shot the elk the previous evening and couldn't locate it* he was going back the next morning to find it.   He was again carrying a bow and arrow.   He found the elk, it wasn't quite dead yet, and it attacked him, killing him.

That you find that amusing is disgusting to me.

*It's hard to follow a blood trail in the dark.  If you end up shooting an animal in the evening before legal shooting time ends, and you wait the usual time so you don't "push" the animal, it's usually better to go back in the morning with good light and find it.


You're free to speak. But I'm still not impressed by alleged sportsmen with weapons that outclass the animals they hunt, and still impressed by the animals and pleased when hunters lose what they see as sport. It's not as if elks can shoot arrows. You say he found the wounded elk. I think it more likely the elk found him. But I respect the environment like that.
 
2020-08-31 8:36:05 AM  

dittybopper: Zeb Hesselgresser: dittybopper: Zeb Hesselgresser: Hunter killed by prey, I feel really bad for the hunter . . . said no one ever.

Oh, I didn't know you were a vegan.

Absolutely not.  I love a good steak/pork chop.  I don't think rooting for the bears during bear season is a contradiction.  I don't have malice for nor do I look down on hunters.  I was one.  It's more of a fair is fair thing.

Ask yourself this question:  Is that how "I feel really bad for the hunter...  said no one ever." comes across?


Yes.  Yes I do.  You went into the woods to kill a wild animal.  I believe in the hierarchy of nature that governs these sorts of things.  If your plans go awry and you die, I will feel bad for the people that loved you and will now live with out you.  But you, the hunter that allowed the 4 pt. escape/takedown at the end of the 3rd period?  You get a he died doing what he loved platitude, and when I see you in heaven I will call you a dumb-ass and buy you a whiskey.
 
2020-08-31 8:38:36 AM  
Good on the prison for not letting that tasty tasty meat go to waste.
 
2020-08-31 8:50:53 AM  

johndalek: jimjays: Mike Royko wrote a column I'm thinking in the 70's that never left me. He said hunting is not a sport. In sports all the players use the same equipment, and as mentioned upthread, understand that they're playing. There's nothing sporting about hiding in the woods and sniping at an animal with an expensive weapon....

i miss mike.  used to read him everyday when his column was in the paper.  according to the story the meat was donated--does that include the hunter?


Indeed. I consider myself incredibly fortunate to have been able to read Royko every morning, through three different local papers at different times. Still smile remembering reading one of those papers on the porch first thing in the morning while I rolled the other papers to deliver to the neighbors. Enjoyed the books for a long time, but they eventually became so outdated, and the Net brings me so many other writers now... (Covid-19 quarantine has me just abut done reading everything from a writer, Bill Bryson, that I suspect came of age reading Royko every day.)
 
2020-08-31 8:58:09 AM  

jimjays: Mike Royko wrote a column I'm thinking in the 70's that never left me. He said hunting is not a sport. 

Real sportsmen would use the tools of the hunted....



Oh, I didn't know some guy wrote a column, that changes everything...

And I am sure hunters around the world will be disappointed with not being able to impress based on random opinions. Especially given the upcoming regional playoffs about to start.

Smiling at other's misfortune is quite a character trait.
 
2020-08-31 9:00:03 AM  

Serious Post on Serious Thread: wademh: [i.imgflip.com image 500x740]

Welllll...that depends. I dnrtfa so not sure. If he was a trophy or 'sportsman' hunter. Then yes, got what he was gonna try to give. But for many people, including mine, hunting is a way to put food on the table. One buck can provide many pounds of venison for a family of modest income. Not likely in play here, but also protecting gardens which also feed families.


Did you recognize Elke Sommer?
 
2020-08-31 9:04:50 AM  

bifster: jimjays: Mike Royko wrote a column I'm thinking in the 70's that never left me. He said hunting is not a sport. 

Real sportsmen would use the tools of the hunted....


Oh, I didn't know some guy wrote a column, that changes everything...

And I am sure hunters around the world will be disappointed with not being able to impress based on random opinions. Especially given the upcoming regional playoffs about to start.

Smiling at other's misfortune is quite a character trait.


As I told another that was in disagreement, you're free to disagree. And I don't care about the judgement or insult. But if you knew Roko other than as  "some guy wrote a column," you'd be better at judgement and insult.
 
2020-08-31 9:07:08 AM  
The only sad part is that the elk is dead.
 
2020-08-31 9:08:09 AM  

dittybopper: Serious Post on Serious Thread: wademh: [i.imgflip.com image 500x740]

Welllll...that depends. I dnrtfa so not sure. If he was a trophy or 'sportsman' hunter. Then yes, got what he was gonna try to give. But for many people, including mine, hunting is a way to put food on the table. One buck can provide many pounds of venison for a family of modest income. Not likely in play here, but also protecting gardens which also feed families.

You're absolutely wrong in the way you feel about that.

There are 3 kinds of hunting:

1.  Subsistence hunting.  This is hunting for food, and in some cases to protect crops, but the main objective of it is to fill your belly and those of your family.

2.  Market hunting.   This is hunting because you are going to sell the parts of the animals you've killed for a profit.  I think the biggest example you will find today is commercial fishing, but it was once very common for hunting to be motivated by profit.  Note that this can be legal, or illegal, and the market can be the government (ie., they pay a bounty for killing predators like wolves).

3.  Sport hunting.  This can also involve eating the animal, or simply looking for a better trophy, but the main purpose isn't to survive either through eating or selling the animal, it's hunting because you enjoy it.

History has shown that the first two cases are the real threat to species.  Someone just trying to feed his kids isn't going to care that the left-hand Agouti he just shot is an endangered species, he just wants to live and for his kids to live.

Similarly, someone who is poaching elephants for their tusks, rhinos for their horns, and big cats for their various parts to make Traditional Chinese Viagra isn't going to care about how endangered the animals are.  They just want to make some money to feed themselves and their kids.

Sport hunters, on the other hand, welcome things like bag limits, limited seasons, restrictions on the kind of equipment they can use, and all the other laws that go with them.   In fact, it was sport hunters who saved big game in North America.   Prior to the 1900's, it was perfectly legal to go out hunting for economic purposes and subsistence in the United States, and there were no legal restrictions on doing that.

As a result, the whitetail deer population in the US plummeted to extremely low levels:

[Fark user image image 313x161]

It was estimated that in 1900 the total US Whitetail Deer population was fewer than 500,000, just 1/60th of what it had been in pre-Columbian times.  That fall was due to not just market hunting, but also to subsistence hunting by settlers reaching farther across the continent.

In fact, you can even see evidence of it in technology.  In Appalachia in the mid 18th Century, the typical locally made rifle was typically .50" or .54".  As the larger species of game like elk and bear disappeared through market and subsistence hunting, the caliber was reduced to .40" or .45" caliber, and as the deer were all killed off, the guns fell into "small game" calibers of .32" and .36" because that's pretty much all that was left*.  Raccoons, squirrels, rabbits, opossum, and you'd have to kill the occasional hog or sow.

Sport hunting, though, brought all of those game species back.  I know it sounds paradoxical, but it has a certain logic to it.  People who enjoy hunting want to keep on hunting, and the best way to do that is to protect the species they hunt from unregulated hunting.  So market hunting and unregulated subsistence hunting were banned in the United States.   You can't go out and hunt deer and sell the hides for profit.   Any buckskin you buy is from farmed deer.  You can't just go out and hunt for food without government permission**.

In fact, I've gone hunting a few times with actual trophy hunters.   Guys whose only goal is to find a deer with a more impressive rack than the ones they have on their walls.   I've seen them pass up deer I absolutely would have shot. Why did they pass it up?  Because "It was only a six pointer".   That's a direct quote.   If you're asking why I didn't shoot, it's because I only hunt primitive (wooden longbow, or flintlock rifle), and that particular deer was far outside of my range.  I saw it pass close by his tree stand though.

It's the trophy hunters who are circumspect about what they shoot.    They're the ones who speed a ton of money on gear, some of which has an 11% federal excise tax on it that goes to wildlife preservation.  They're the ones who work to preserve wild habitat for the game animals they hunt, which also preserves those areas for non-game species.

You want to preserve a species? Get sport hunters involved in it.  They'll take too few animals to make a difference in the species, and they'll pump huge amounts of cash into preservation so they can keep hunting.


*Muzzleloaders, especially round ball shooting guns, have larger calibers than modern guns for the same purpose because of their inefficiency.  So you wouldn't hunt squirrels today with a .30" caliber modern rifle, but a .32" muzzleloader is perfect for hunting squirrels.

**Though I did know a family in the Adirondacks who did that when I was a kid.  The local game wardens knew it was going on, but turned a blind eye as long as they were discreet about it.  The family was dirt poor and putting mom and dad in jail or fining them would only make the situation worse.  The family always took a couple more deer than their tags would allow, and occasionally did it out of season, but only what they needed.


Ah. No. Hard pass on that. Maybe it's regional, but what you're saying is all sports hunters are conservationists. That's bullshiat as exhibited by many species hunted to extinction by 'sportsmen' or trophy hunters. Conservation is pretty well maintained by game limits and permits mostly for people who want the meat. (Yes, the bigger the rack the better the boasting). But a trophy hunter only allowed to bag one buck doesn't change anything if he passes on a 6 pointer to go for the hope of a 12 pointer. That's no difference in population.

Now I'm not really familiar with marketing hunting. I guess if you still live in area that traffics pelts, or rhinoceros horn or something.  But the only hunting I'm aware of in upstate ny is for food (rabbit squirrel deer fishing turkey bear (bear is pretty crappy meat btw)).  Whereas venison is very tasty mixed with lard if ground or wrapped in bacon if tenderloin or steak. Or varmint control, woodchuck farking up a garden, coyote or fox on a farm.

So I don't buy trophy hunters as anything other than just wanting to kill something for fun. The adult version of drowning a cat or burning ants for fun. If you want to kill something it's either because it's doing you harm or is food.
 
2020-08-31 9:12:35 AM  

REO-Weedwagon: Why the f*ck do these assholes shoot an 800-pound animal with an arrow? It's a horrific, slow and tortuous way for a large animal to die, not to mention loads of work tracking the thing after you "stick" it. A bull elk is an animal that's real easy to get close to, providing a clean shot with a high-powered rifle.


Many places and times, arrows are all that's allowed. Often do to proximity of people. Like you can hunt on military base property, but since  you are close to training areas, you can only use arrows, since they won't travel near as far as rifle ammo.
Plus with a proper broad head arrow, if you aim with anything approaching skill, a shot to the lung or heart will kill it just as quickly.
 
2020-08-31 9:16:17 AM  
jimjays:

As I told another that was in disagreement, you're free to disagree. And I don't care about the judgement or insult. But if you knew Roko other than as  "some guy wrote a column," you'd be better at judgement and insult.

Is that where you learned to be judgmental of others? Those must have been quite impressive columns, sorry I missed those. I'll have to work harder.

Hello Pot? Kettle, on line 1.
 
2020-08-31 9:19:17 AM  
The difficulty in hunting an Elk is that they live in extremely rugged terrain, cover vast amount of distance, and are particularly wary. As a bow hunter myself, your average Whitetail kill is normally within 30 yards and because they are fairly predictable creatures, happen in known locations you have already prepared.

Elk hunting requires you humping over miles of terrain with ALL your gear, carefully calling just to get a chance at a shot which in most cases will be within 50-60 yards. Well outside of you weekend hunters ethical shot range.

Having said that, Elk are no harder to 'kill' than anything else when you stick an arrow through it. Rapid ex-sanguination, sudden blood pressure drop, ole back legs wobble, and a face plant.  provided you known what youre doing, your aim is good, and your equipment is up to the challenge. This guy stuck an arrow that had poor penetration somewhere non-vital, and the Elk made him pay for it.
 
2020-08-31 9:56:44 AM  
"Mark David, 66, was gored and killed Sunday by an elk that he had shot on Saturday evening."

Insert Tommy Boy deer video here.

/at least the hunter didn't explode into a cloud of glitter and bats.
 
2020-08-31 10:06:38 AM  
pbs.twimg.comView Full Size
 
2020-08-31 10:19:29 AM  
Everyone just calm down.  Smiling at or enjoying the karma/irony of the situation is not malice nor should it be construed as a desire for all hunters to meet their end in a dark field.  Life is precarious and that's why the word precious is so close in it's spelling.  The hunters life was precious to himself, just as the prey's life was.  Man can choose to prioritize his life over they prey, but so can the prey.  That said, the local vet should have been called to save the animal and put a notch on it's antler.

Katsumoto: It was a good death.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-31 10:35:27 AM  
Elk meat is delicious.
 
2020-08-31 10:36:46 AM  

Calypsocookie: If you really analyze hunting, it is a fight to the death. Of course it's a fight that the prey doesn't really know it's involved in until it's too late most of the time. A fight that is almost always skewed in the human's favor by their choice of weapon.

The elk won this one.

/it's still dead of course
//and being cooked for inmates
///still won


I would record this as a tie.
 
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