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(CNN)   A long time ago, in a galaxy far, far away   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Milky Way, Galaxy, host galaxy of the black hole, Dark matter, Large Array, Andromeda Galaxy, Galaxy collapse, Spiral galaxy  
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1816 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Aug 2020 at 1:41 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



21 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-08-12 9:11:38 PM  
The Sith are dead. Otherwise, they would have figured out a polygalaxy plan. And Trump would have been force choked to death in 1982.
 
2020-08-12 9:26:53 PM  
Complete idiot here.

How can they tell distance in light years? There isn't a measuring tape that long.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-12 10:13:43 PM  
AIEEE RINGU
 
2020-08-13 1:48:57 AM  
Given the distance of this galaxy, the researchers used a technique calledgravitational lensing while observing with ALMA. This uses the gravity of nearby galaxies to magnify distant galaxies by bending their light.

I have to admit, I have not heard of this and have no idea how it works.  But it's intriguing as hell and I'm going to go study it now, if my feeble mind is up to the task
 
2020-08-13 2:01:07 AM  

August11: The Sith are dead. Otherwise, they would have figured out a polygalaxy plan. And Trump would have been force choked to death in 1982.


I'm not sure he wouldn't be their leader.
 
2020-08-13 3:00:35 AM  

AsparagusFTW: Complete idiot here.

How can they tell distance in light years? There isn't a measuring tape that long.

[Fark user image 275x183]


They put an odometer on a dog and convert from dog years.
 
2020-08-13 3:03:35 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-13 3:29:36 AM  

Tom Marvolo Bombadil: [Fark user image 461x392]


Galaxyse.ce?
 
2020-08-13 3:36:48 AM  
.

BadReligion: Tom Marvolo Bombadil: [Fark user image 461x392]

Galaxyse.cx?


FTFM
 
2020-08-13 4:46:30 AM  
Galak See
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-13 5:26:26 AM  
Wow, that is really old for a spiral galaxy with a comparably diverse stellar ecosystem. That is the deepest comment I can make, but I nodded sagely as I typed it and even went "Hmm!" despite there being nobody around. So now I feel scientific.
 
2020-08-13 6:12:43 AM  

AsparagusFTW: How can they tell distance in light years? There isn't a measuring tape that long.


If you're seriously looking for the right answer:  They use something called a standard candle.  For stuff relatively close to us, they use something called a Cepheid variable (a type of star that pulsates a lot, and there's a strong relationship between it's brightness and pulsation period).  By comparing the known brightness of the Cepheid, to what you're looking at, you can judge distance.  For stuff further away, they use supernovae.  Same principle.

There's some real problems with this method, of course.  But it's the best we've got today.
 
2020-08-13 6:27:02 AM  

Naido: Given the distance of this galaxy, the researchers used a technique calledgravitational lensing while observing with ALMA. This uses the gravity of nearby galaxies to magnify distant galaxies by bending their light.

I have to admit, I have not heard of this and have no idea how it works.  But it's intriguing as hell and I'm going to go study it now, if my feeble mind is up to the task


It literally works the same way that a glass lense works to magnify things. It just bends the light.
 
2020-08-13 6:31:59 AM  
"Disney is probably ruining that galaxy too." - Some insecure white man, probably.
 
2020-08-13 8:12:47 AM  

kudayta: AsparagusFTW: How can they tell distance in light years? There isn't a measuring tape that long.

If you're seriously looking for the right answer:  They use something called a standard candle.  For stuff relatively close to us, they use something called a Cepheid variable (a type of star that pulsates a lot, and there's a strong relationship between it's brightness and pulsation period).  By comparing the known brightness of the Cepheid, to what you're looking at, you can judge distance.  For stuff further away, they use supernovae.  Same principle.

There's some real problems with this method, of course.  But it's the best we've got today.


And for things closer than that, you can use parallax, how much a close star moves compared to the far distant background stars when Earth is on one side of its orbit compared to the other side.

You can simulate this by holding your arm up with a finger extended vertically with your left eye closed and looking at your fingernail with your right eye.  That fingernail is the distant star.   Then close your right eye and open your left eye and see how your fingernail seems to move against the distant background.

In astronomy, if you can measure how much the closer star moves compared to the stars very far away, then you can use bog-standard trigonometry to figure the distance.  Turns out that one "parallel arc-second", or parsec, works out to about 3.3 light years.
 
2020-08-13 8:24:01 AM  

kudayta: AsparagusFTW: How can they tell distance in light years? There isn't a measuring tape that long.

If you're seriously looking for the right answer:  They use something called a standard candle.  For stuff relatively close to us, they use something called a Cepheid variable (a type of star that pulsates a lot, and there's a strong relationship between it's brightness and pulsation period).  By comparing the known brightness of the Cepheid, to what you're looking at, you can judge distance.  For stuff further away, they use supernovae.  Same principle.

There's some real problems with this method, of course.  But it's the best we've got today.


dittybopper: kudayta: AsparagusFTW: How can they tell distance in light years? There isn't a measuring tape that long.

If you're seriously looking for the right answer:  They use something called a standard candle.  For stuff relatively close to us, they use something called a Cepheid variable (a type of star that pulsates a lot, and there's a strong relationship between it's brightness and pulsation period).  By comparing the known brightness of the Cepheid, to what you're looking at, you can judge distance.  For stuff further away, they use supernovae.  Same principle.

There's some real problems with this method, of course.  But it's the best we've got today.

And for things closer than that, you can use parallax, how much a close star moves compared to the far distant background stars when Earth is on one side of its orbit compared to the other side.

You can simulate this by holding your arm up with a finger extended vertically with your left eye closed and looking at your fingernail with your right eye.  That fingernail is the distant star.   Then close your right eye and open your left eye and see how your fingernail seems to move against the distant background.

In astronomy, if you can measure how much the closer star moves compared to the stars very far away, then you can use bog-standard trigonometry to figure the distance.  Turns out that one "parallel arc-second", or parsec, works out to about 3.3 light years.


Thank you!
 
2020-08-13 8:35:35 AM  
It's a reverse telemetric circular light anomaly. It is actually our own galaxy time corrected and reflected back at us.

/It's early, that was the best mumbo-jumbo anomaly I could invent
//Star trek writers could do better
 
2020-08-13 8:59:45 AM  
What if it was us, but 12 billion years ago?  We teleported over here two weeks ago.
 
2020-08-13 9:06:28 AM  

gnosis301: What if it was us, but 12 billion years ago?  We teleported over here two weeks ago.


thumbs.gfycat.comView Full Size
 
2020-08-13 11:10:49 AM  

AsparagusFTW: Complete idiot here.

How can they tell distance in light years? There isn't a measuring tape that long.

[Fark user image image 275x183]


Flashlight and a stopwatch
 
2020-08-13 7:21:09 PM  

August11: The Sith are dead. Otherwise, they would have figured out a polygalaxy plan. And Trump would have been force choked to death in 1982.


Negative. Trump is the 3rd Sith.
 
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