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(Slate)   Let's look at the ways bosses are mistreating their remote workers   (slate.com) divider line
    More: Asinine, Management, Employment, work-related anxieties, real work, unnecessary lengthy daily team meetings, Working time, work ethic, awful lot of managers  
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699 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 12 Aug 2020 at 9:05 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



33 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-08-12 9:30:56 AM  
I'm in IT. When we were first sent home, we were told we needed to support the helpdesk by taking calls, with management saying "we're not keeping score on how many calls you take".

You can see where this is going.

Three weeks later, we get an email with everyone's stats on it, praising the two highest people. "Oh, and you need to make sure you're logged into the call manager first thing in the morning. You can only use these four statuses, even though there are fifteen of them and some of them more accurately reflect what you might be working on."

"Those remote video help sessions you were going to have to do once a quarter? You're now doing them twice a month. No, there's no template, suggested format, or invitee list. Figure it out".

God help you if you do something management doesn't like because you'll hear about it immediately in a "No, not that way" manner with helpful suggestions they were unwilling to give before. But that's not germane to working from home. It just makes it more likely because micro managers hate that they've lost a semblance of control.
 
2020-08-12 9:49:29 AM  

Thosw: It just makes it more likely because micro managers hate that they've lost a semblance of control.


Yup. Their entire value as middlemen is that they can squeeze extra pennies of labor out of you, the peon and this crisis has shown how worthless they are.

It may have just been a one-season TV show, but Firefly astutely pointed out that middlemen don't take kindly to being eliminated.
 
2020-08-12 9:51:32 AM  
I'm glad we didn't have to worry about any of that.  HR kind of went on a power trip when it all started but had to relax a little bit when they realized their draconian rules weren't going to work like they thought.

I made my team check in with me at 9am.  I checked in with my boss once a week on Monday.
We all had more than enough to do without me micromanaging or being micromanaged.
 
2020-08-12 9:51:54 AM  
Fun tip.

Take a good weighted glass, usually ones with a heavy base. Invert it, place your optical mouse on it whenever you leave your home desk. The result is mouse jitter, and monitoring software thinks you're always at your desk.
 
2020-08-12 10:09:46 AM  

Joe USer: Fun tip.

Take a good weighted glass, usually ones with a heavy base. Invert it, place your optical mouse on it whenever you leave your home desk. The result is mouse jitter, and monitoring software thinks you're always at your desk.


Wrong thread.  You're looking for the article on how employees take advantage of working remotely.

/ there must be three paragraphs about Fark alone
// I'm working I swear
/// third slashie whether at home or in the office
 
2020-08-12 10:19:22 AM  
I work for the Federal government and have had nothing but support. When work at home was instituted, we were encouraged to take home office furniture and accessories to make our home offices usable and functional. Ergonomic assessment was also possible to ensure a safe, healthy work environment. A new leave code was initiated so that if we needed to take time for dealing with kids, relatives or just felt stressed and needed time off to recharge we could do so. We had a few hiccups in the first months as IT was suddenly overloaded but they did a great job and now things are pretty smooth. We do meetings when needed via MS Teams. Our department has even started virtual coffee meetups (10:30 Friday) or virtual cocktail hours (4:30 Friday). They also encourage online courses and seminars to keep us sharp. Our keystrokes etc. are not being monitored (or so I am told).

Our production has actually increased, according to management's own stats. The supplemental leave I mentioned above has not been abused. I, for one, have not used it at all even though I know I could easily take a few days off, no questions asked. I doubt the office will ever reopen. I do miss my colleagues, but I was mostly working from home already and am pretty happy on my own.

Only issue is my wife has the 'real' office upstairs while I toil in the room beside the washing machines and litter box.
 
2020-08-12 10:39:54 AM  

Oliver Twisted: Joe USer: Fun tip.

Take a good weighted glass, usually ones with a heavy base. Invert it, place your optical mouse on it whenever you leave your home desk. The result is mouse jitter, and monitoring software thinks you're always at your desk.

Wrong thread.  You're looking for the article on how employees take advantage of working remotely.

/ there must be three paragraphs about Fark alone
// I'm working I swear
/// third slashie whether at home or in the office


That's not taking advantage, it's taking back. Spy software is a blight on the industry, it's overuse just proves incompetent managers get promoted.
 
2020-08-12 11:21:04 AM  

Thosw: I'm in IT. When we were first sent home, we were told we needed to support the helpdesk by taking calls, with management saying "we're not keeping score on how many calls you take".

You can see where this is going.

Three weeks later, we get an email with everyone's stats on it, praising the two highest people. "Oh, and you need to make sure you're logged into the call manager first thing in the morning. You can only use these four statuses, even though there are fifteen of them and some of them more accurately reflect what you might be working on."

"Those remote video help sessions you were going to have to do once a quarter? You're now doing them twice a month. No, there's no template, suggested format, or invitee list. Figure it out".

God help you if you do something management doesn't like because you'll hear about it immediately in a "No, not that way" manner with helpful suggestions they were unwilling to give before. But that's not germane to working from home. It just makes it more likely because micro managers hate that they've lost a semblance of control.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-12 11:23:04 AM  

lonomoholo: I work for the Federal government and have had nothing but support. When work at home was instituted, we were encouraged to take home office furniture and accessories to make our home offices usable and functional. Ergonomic assessment was also possible to ensure a safe, healthy work environment. A new leave code was initiated so that if we needed to take time for dealing with kids, relatives or just felt stressed and needed time off to recharge we could do so. We had a few hiccups in the first months as IT was suddenly overloaded but they did a great job and now things are pretty smooth. We do meetings when needed via MS Teams. Our department has even started virtual coffee meetups (10:30 Friday) or virtual cocktail hours (4:30 Friday). They also encourage online courses and seminars to keep us sharp. Our keystrokes etc. are not being monitored (or so I am told).

Our production has actually increased, according to management's own stats. The supplemental leave I mentioned above has not been abused. I, for one, have not used it at all even though I know I could easily take a few days off, no questions asked. I doubt the office will ever reopen. I do miss my colleagues, but I was mostly working from home already and am pretty happy on my own.

Only issue is my wife has the 'real' office upstairs while I toil in the room beside the washing machines and litter box.


My dad & brother work for the federal government as well. They are getting plenty of support to stay home and keep up their productivity. Not spending 2 hours a day commuting also helps them to not be so frustrated when they get to work as well.
 
2020-08-12 11:29:37 AM  

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Thosw: It just makes it more likely because micro managers hate that they've lost a semblance of control.

Yup. Their entire value as middlemen is that they can squeeze extra pennies of labor out of you, the peon and this crisis has shown how worthless they are.

It may have just been a one-season TV show, but Firefly astutely pointed out that middlemen don't take kindly to being eliminated.


Bbbbut they have arbitrary metrics to hit to get their bonuses!
 
2020-08-12 11:41:31 AM  

lonomoholo: I work for the Federal government and have had nothing but support. When work at home was instituted, we were encouraged to take home office furniture and accessories to make our home offices usable and functional. Ergonomic assessment was also possible to ensure a safe, healthy work environment. A new leave code was initiated so that if we needed to take time for dealing with kids, relatives or just felt stressed and needed time off to recharge we could do so. We had a few hiccups in the first months as IT was suddenly overloaded but they did a great job and now things are pretty smooth. We do meetings when needed via MS Teams. Our department has even started virtual coffee meetups (10:30 Friday) or virtual cocktail hours (4:30 Friday). They also encourage online courses and seminars to keep us sharp. Our keystrokes etc. are not being monitored (or so I am told).

Our production has actually increased, according to management's own stats. The supplemental leave I mentioned above has not been abused. I, for one, have not used it at all even though I know I could easily take a few days off, no questions asked. I doubt the office will ever reopen. I do miss my colleagues, but I was mostly working from home already and am pretty happy on my own.

Only issue is my wife has the 'real' office upstairs while I toil in the room beside the washing machines and litter box.


Meh, if you work for the Federal Government, no one expects you to be busy.
 
2020-08-12 12:04:14 PM  

bfh0417: lonomoholo: I work for the Federal government and have had nothing but support. When work at home was instituted, we were encouraged to take home office furniture and accessories to make our home offices usable and functional. Ergonomic assessment was also possible to ensure a safe, healthy work environment. A new leave code was initiated so that if we needed to take time for dealing with kids, relatives or just felt stressed and needed time off to recharge we could do so. We had a few hiccups in the first months as IT was suddenly overloaded but they did a great job and now things are pretty smooth. We do meetings when needed via MS Teams. Our department has even started virtual coffee meetups (10:30 Friday) or virtual cocktail hours (4:30 Friday). They also encourage online courses and seminars to keep us sharp. Our keystrokes etc. are not being monitored (or so I am told).

Our production has actually increased, according to management's own stats. The supplemental leave I mentioned above has not been abused. I, for one, have not used it at all even though I know I could easily take a few days off, no questions asked. I doubt the office will ever reopen. I do miss my colleagues, but I was mostly working from home already and am pretty happy on my own.

Only issue is my wife has the 'real' office upstairs while I toil in the room beside the washing machines and litter box.

Meh, if you work for the Federal Government, no one expects you to be busy.


I really cannot complain. I can work from my friggin' deck if I feel so inclined.

Fark user imageView Full Size


Do I sound smug yet?
 
2020-08-12 12:11:54 PM  
Sounds like it's the managers that aren't doing any real work, and dreaming up things to make them look busy.
 
2020-08-12 12:19:42 PM  
My company has been pretty great, and are not involved in micromanaging us. My team does a check-in call in the morning and an end of day call in the afternoon, but they're mostly so we can just all interface a little bit.
In March they basically said "GO!" and told us we could take any equipment or chairs, etc we needed. They're not trying to steal our PTO, load additional duties on us, etc. Our productivity has improved and basically the whole company is impressed as hell at how seamlessly the whole company moved to neverending WFH. And I just got a 14% raise for my yearly. Booyah.

All that said, I find I have to force myself to pace myself, or I paint myself into a too much work/stress corner. Being in the office naturally does that because other people are mostly a waste of time.
 
2020-08-12 12:41:57 PM  
We've been pretty lucky for the most part at work.
Admins were given a chance to stay WFH or go on once a week. I decided to stay, not go on when I need to get my hands on a server or something.

Techs rotate fir the few people still in the office, mainly management, and for our county offices.

The help desk, which for some God awful reason is tied to the training department, are being micro managed by their boss.

We've got a dozen projects from sever replacement to O365 deployment to getting 1k PC's ready to swap, but it's been pretty dammed great.

And with this being in Georgia with a relatively conservative company I'm happily surprised with how it's been handled.
 
2020-08-12 12:44:28 PM  
My company was encouraging WFH before covid for some of us. I have 2 employees that work form home in Tennessee, while the rest of us live in Metro Atlanta. My boss loaded a desk in his truck and delivered it to my house. I brought 2 monitors home, a docking station, keyboard, mouse, my Polycom VVX500 phone, my wireless headset, and they also gave me an office chair. The only staff working at any of our locations regularly at this point are our logistics team at the warehouse, and one member of management at our office to receive packages. Life is good working IT remotely.
 
2020-08-12 12:51:13 PM  

Thosw: I'm in IT. When we were first sent home, we were told we needed to support the helpdesk by taking calls, with management saying "we're not keeping score on how many calls you take".

You can see where this is going.

Three weeks later, we get an email with everyone's stats on it, praising the two highest people. "Oh, and you need to make sure you're logged into the call manager first thing in the morning. You can only use these four statuses, even though there are fifteen of them and some of them more accurately reflect what you might be working on."

"Those remote video help sessions you were going to have to do once a quarter? You're now doing them twice a month. No, there's no template, suggested format, or invitee list. Figure it out".

God help you if you do something management doesn't like because you'll hear about it immediately in a "No, not that way" manner with helpful suggestions they were unwilling to give before. But that's not germane to working from home. It just makes it more likely because micro managers hate that they've lost a semblance of control.


A long while ago I worked in a place that insisted that changing to this new ticket system the new boss would not be monitoring activity... I was smart enough to smell the forest from the trees.
In the 8 months before review I had taken and resolved 2600 tickets to the next person 800 who believed that the system would be used as presented.  Any time I got a call, I logged it.  They needed help lighting a BBQ grill one day... I logged it.
I quit working there when the CFO wanted me to report to him when the manager showed up (was notoriously late.. by hours).

Employer has gone so far as to require workers to install a monitoring program on their personal laptops:

Umm yeah no.. no personal laptop are connected to the network in ANY way as we do not have control of software and patching.  They get a View Client  and a 10Zig.
 
2020-08-12 12:51:58 PM  

lonomoholo: I work for the Federal government and have had nothing but support. When work at home was instituted, we were encouraged to take home office furniture and accessories to make our home offices usable and functional. Ergonomic assessment was also possible to ensure a safe, healthy work environment. A new leave code was initiated so that if we needed to take time for dealing with kids, relatives or just felt stressed and needed time off to recharge we could do so. We had a few hiccups in the first months as IT was suddenly overloaded but they did a great job and now things are pretty smooth. We do meetings when needed via MS Teams. Our department has even started virtual coffee meetups (10:30 Friday) or virtual cocktail hours (4:30 Friday). They also encourage online courses and seminars to keep us sharp. Our keystrokes etc. are not being monitored (or so I am told).

Our production has actually increased, according to management's own stats. The supplemental leave I mentioned above has not been abused. I, for one, have not used it at all even though I know I could easily take a few days off, no questions asked. I doubt the office will ever reopen. I do miss my colleagues, but I was mostly working from home already and am pretty happy on my own.

Only issue is my wife has the 'real' office upstairs while I toil in the room beside the washing machines and litter box.


This flies in the face of all I know and hold dear about government, particularly the federal government.

Be gone contented government employee, leprechaun, unicorn, or otherwise mythical beast.

/Oh, and congrats
 
2020-08-12 1:18:10 PM  
As someone who works for the government and has been dragged back to work on a full time schedule for several weeks now, :( reading this thread.

/supervision is claiming the lab is being very conservative
 
2020-08-12 1:21:51 PM  
"Hire good people and leave them alone." -- William McKnight
 
2020-08-12 2:50:34 PM  

lonomoholo: bfh0417: lonomoholo: I work for the Federal government and have had nothing but support. When work at home was instituted, we were encouraged to take home office furniture and accessories to make our home offices usable and functional. Ergonomic assessment was also possible to ensure a safe, healthy work environment. A new leave code was initiated so that if we needed to take time for dealing with kids, relatives or just felt stressed and needed time off to recharge we could do so. We had a few hiccups in the first months as IT was suddenly overloaded but they did a great job and now things are pretty smooth. We do meetings when needed via MS Teams. Our department has even started virtual coffee meetups (10:30 Friday) or virtual cocktail hours (4:30 Friday). They also encourage online courses and seminars to keep us sharp. Our keystrokes etc. are not being monitored (or so I am told).

Our production has actually increased, according to management's own stats. The supplemental leave I mentioned above has not been abused. I, for one, have not used it at all even though I know I could easily take a few days off, no questions asked. I doubt the office will ever reopen. I do miss my colleagues, but I was mostly working from home already and am pretty happy on my own.

Only issue is my wife has the 'real' office upstairs while I toil in the room beside the washing machines and litter box.

Meh, if you work for the Federal Government, no one expects you to be busy.

I really cannot complain. I can work from my friggin' deck if I feel so inclined.

[Fark user image 327x154]

Do I sound smug yet?


Local government, and this. They never let people WFH before this, and suddenly they realize people can still do their job well from home or their deck and things still run. I get to have the schedule I like (6am - 2:30pm), no stressful commute, no stress sitting in the office with all the co-workers I don't like, and plenty of time to read, cook, exercise, etc., you know, actually having a work-life balance.

My frustration is that I did not have a webcam (and didn't want one), but I finally bought one because I was tired of being asked stupid "are you there?" type questions on calls, even though I responded promptly, asked questions and participated in meetings. Because they couldn't see me, they just assumed I wasn't there or something...
 
2020-08-12 3:17:41 PM  

shabu: lonomoholo: I work for the Federal government and have had nothing but support. When work at home was instituted, we were encouraged to take home office furniture and accessories to make our home offices usable and functional. Ergonomic assessment was also possible to ensure a safe, healthy work environment. A new leave code was initiated so that if we needed to take time for dealing with kids, relatives or just felt stressed and needed time off to recharge we could do so. We had a few hiccups in the first months as IT was suddenly overloaded but they did a great job and now things are pretty smooth. We do meetings when needed via MS Teams. Our department has even started virtual coffee meetups (10:30 Friday) or virtual cocktail hours (4:30 Friday). They also encourage online courses and seminars to keep us sharp. Our keystrokes etc. are not being monitored (or so I am told).

Our production has actually increased, according to management's own stats. The supplemental leave I mentioned above has not been abused. I, for one, have not used it at all even though I know I could easily take a few days off, no questions asked. I doubt the office will ever reopen. I do miss my colleagues, but I was mostly working from home already and am pretty happy on my own.

Only issue is my wife has the 'real' office upstairs while I toil in the room beside the washing machines and litter box.

This flies in the face of all I know and hold dear about government, particularly the federal government.

Be gone contented government employee, leprechaun, unicorn, or otherwise mythical beast.

/Oh, and congrats


It's weird. The job was a stop gap between psot-doc and my own lab. Wife was out of work so I figured I could work for the Feds for a year or two. Well, 15 + years on and I am still there. I really hated my job for the first little while but now I know the ropes and what is (minimally) excpected so I go with it. Still scienc-y enough, although I do miss hands on research.
 
2020-08-12 3:18:22 PM  

lonomoholo: shabu: lonomoholo: I work for the Federal government and have had nothing but support. When work at home was instituted, we were encouraged to take home office furniture and accessories to make our home offices usable and functional. Ergonomic assessment was also possible to ensure a safe, healthy work environment. A new leave code was initiated so that if we needed to take time for dealing with kids, relatives or just felt stressed and needed time off to recharge we could do so. We had a few hiccups in the first months as IT was suddenly overloaded but they did a great job and now things are pretty smooth. We do meetings when needed via MS Teams. Our department has even started virtual coffee meetups (10:30 Friday) or virtual cocktail hours (4:30 Friday). They also encourage online courses and seminars to keep us sharp. Our keystrokes etc. are not being monitored (or so I am told).

Our production has actually increased, according to management's own stats. The supplemental leave I mentioned above has not been abused. I, for one, have not used it at all even though I know I could easily take a few days off, no questions asked. I doubt the office will ever reopen. I do miss my colleagues, but I was mostly working from home already and am pretty happy on my own.

Only issue is my wife has the 'real' office upstairs while I toil in the room beside the washing machines and litter box.

This flies in the face of all I know and hold dear about government, particularly the federal government.

Be gone contented government employee, leprechaun, unicorn, or otherwise mythical beast.

/Oh, and congrats

It's weird. The job was a stop gap between psot-doc and my own lab. Wife was out of work so I figured I could work for the Feds for a year or two. Well, 15 + years on and I am still there. I really hated my job for the first little while but now I know the ropes and what is (minimally) excpected so I go with it. Still scienc-y enough, although I do miss hands on research.


expected
Clearly, spelling prowess not required.
 
2020-08-12 3:29:13 PM  

Joe USer: Oliver Twisted: Joe USer: Fun tip.

Take a good weighted glass, usually ones with a heavy base. Invert it, place your optical mouse on it whenever you leave your home desk. The result is mouse jitter, and monitoring software thinks you're always at your desk.

Wrong thread.  You're looking for the article on how employees take advantage of working remotely.

/ there must be three paragraphs about Fark alone
// I'm working I swear
/// third slashie whether at home or in the office

That's not taking advantage, it's taking back. Spy software is a blight on the industry, it's overuse just proves incompetent managers get promoted.


Holy fark, I'm glad this is illegal where I live.

"Hmm... How can we make sure our workers are motivated, focused and meet their goals while working from home?"
"Uh, show them some trust? Maybe some creative control to better identify with the project? Periodic check ins?"
"Don't be ridiculous! Just make sure their mouse doesn't stop moving because that's how 'working' works. More faster clicking = more money."
 
2020-08-12 4:44:28 PM  

lonomoholo: expected
Clearly, spelling prowess not required.


Lack of hands-on research erodes one's grammar performance.
 
2020-08-12 4:45:25 PM  

bisi: Joe USer: Oliver Twisted: Joe USer: Fun tip.

Take a good weighted glass, usually ones with a heavy base. Invert it, place your optical mouse on it whenever you leave your home desk. The result is mouse jitter, and monitoring software thinks you're always at your desk.

Wrong thread.  You're looking for the article on how employees take advantage of working remotely.

/ there must be three paragraphs about Fark alone
// I'm working I swear
/// third slashie whether at home or in the office

That's not taking advantage, it's taking back. Spy software is a blight on the industry, it's overuse just proves incompetent managers get promoted.

Holy fark, I'm glad this is illegal where I live.

"Hmm... How can we make sure our workers are motivated, focused and meet their goals while working from home?"
"Uh, show them some trust? Maybe some creative control to better identify with the project? Periodic check ins?"
"Don't be ridiculous! Just make sure their mouse doesn't stop moving because that's how 'working' works. More faster clicking = more money."


Can't you just tie the mouse to the cat's tail?
 
Ant
2020-08-12 5:42:03 PM  
I've never worked somewhere that trusts its employees so much to get their shiat done without any supervision at all. It kind of freaks me out after working for micromanagers for 15 of the previous 20 years.
 
2020-08-12 7:08:45 PM  

bisi: Joe USer: Oliver Twisted: Joe USer: Fun tip.

Take a good weighted glass, usually ones with a heavy base. Invert it, place your optical mouse on it whenever you leave your home desk. The result is mouse jitter, and monitoring software thinks you're always at your desk.

Wrong thread.  You're looking for the article on how employees take advantage of working remotely.

/ there must be three paragraphs about Fark alone
// I'm working I swear
/// third slashie whether at home or in the office

That's not taking advantage, it's taking back. Spy software is a blight on the industry, it's overuse just proves incompetent managers get promoted.

Holy fark, I'm glad this is illegal where I live.

"Hmm... How can we make sure our workers are motivated, focused and meet their goals while working from home?"
"Uh, show them some trust? Maybe some creative control to better identify with the project? Periodic check ins?"
"Don't be ridiculous! Just make sure their mouse doesn't stop moving because that's how 'working' works. More faster clicking = more money."


Very much this. They can't even legally access my company mail account without good reason. Slet alone track my mouse/keyboard/internet usage.
 
2020-08-12 7:23:19 PM  
In other words, micro managers need to micro-manage, and bad managers are clueless.  There is a huge overlap between those two.

I've worked for 2 micromanagers, both drove me out of the company.  I've worked for numerous bad managers, most drove me out of the company.

/ I've worked for more companies than most because I was a consultant for 10 years
//  Really bad managers seem to survive layoffs better than good managers
/// or maybe the good managers get new jobs and leave the bad ones behind
//// don't care anymore, I'm retired.
 
2020-08-12 7:33:32 PM  

Dr Jack Badofsky: lonomoholo: expected
Clearly, spelling prowess not required.

Lack of hands-on research erodes one's grammar performance.


also spelled post as psot

Dman it!
 
2020-08-12 8:31:07 PM  

lonomoholo: also spelled post as psot  Dman it!


"Psot-grad" needs to be an acronym or abbreviation or something.  Pronounced like "sot", and meaning "managed to get grad degree despite being drunk a lot"?

Orking from home here has not really been that difficult, though YMMV.  I orked from home Tue and Thu starting in Dec. 2018 with managerial blessing.  It helps that all of my cow-orkers are spread out across multiple time zones, states, and cities, and have been ever since I started with this new group.  (Don't live in AZ and have all your cow-orkers on the east coast, they'll schedule a meeting that starts at 10:45am and forget that you're UTC-7 while they're UTC-4.)  I rarely turn my video camera on, usually only when I can get Her Fuzziness to show herself on camera.  People like seeing cats on video for some reason.
 
2020-08-13 2:14:20 AM  
Herein, is one reason why it is so important for parents, students, and their privacy minded allies to battle against school requirements that cameras remain on or that a school or professor be allowed to visually monitor students in their homes. Allowing schools to impose those requirements habituates students to those conditions so that they do not even know to object when subjected to inappropriate monitoring in the work place.

Allowing government schools to monitor students in their homes, lowers resistance to being monitored in the home by other government agencies as well. Stop for a moment and consider whether you think DFCS should be allowed to monitor, via web cam or another electronic device, a family's home for the first year of a baby's life, the first year following a foster care placement, or the first year following an adoption, or following Granny's trip to the ER for a bad fall.Should LEO be allowed to electronically monitor a family home for the duration of the probation period if the college aged son gets a DUI? Do you want the military to have the authority and capacity to remotely activate in-home cameras to check for residents who may be suitable for a draft? What if you're embroiled in a personal injury lawsuit with a government agency? Should that agency have a right to monitor you in your home to ensure you are not a malingerer or refusing appropriate treatment?
 
2020-08-13 5:06:50 PM  
My main client gives zero farks how I get the work done. They only yell if I miss the printing deadline.

When I was having some trouble with depression and motivation I actually asked him to micromanage me a little bit and he said no.
 
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