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(The Register)   School districts are losing their minds at the thought of business in front and a party in the back   (theregister.com) divider line
    More: Amusing, Pajamas, Trousers, Blanket sleeper, Nightwear, English-language films, Dress, Fox Broadcasting Company, Education  
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3165 clicks; posted to Politics » on 11 Aug 2020 at 5:04 PM (23 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



40 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-08-11 2:01:35 PM  
Okay, party in front, business in the back, then.
i.pinimg.comView Full Size
 
2020-08-11 2:09:37 PM  
For the administrative types, the worst part is not being able to control the little children.
 
2020-08-11 2:47:26 PM  
Listen, as a principal, I believe the no pajama rule is stupid. I once worked in a school that had a dress code that listed what kind of socks a kid could wear.  The principal would come in with a quarter and if he could not cover up the entire logo, the kid was sent home.  It was a giant waste of time and resources.  Now that I am a principal, I wonder how he had the time to do something like that.

But let's be honest, this is not about wearing pajama pants and a t-shirt.  This rule is talking about those adult onesies with animal heads as the hood. (I'm not about to do an image search for "adult onesie" at work.) All this could have been avoided by saying something like, Students should wear clothes appropriate for learning.  95% of the kids will comply. The 5% could be dealt with individually and this would not be a big deal.
 
2020-08-11 3:40:44 PM  
What's the great disturbance of a child wearing a unicorn onesie to a zoom call?
 
2020-08-11 5:06:54 PM  
Politics?
 
2020-08-11 5:09:04 PM  
If you don't end up with an unsolicited dick pic (or worse) in a school Zoom meeting you should consider yourself fortunate, but many of the nation's school districts are not run by smart people. Obviously.
 
2020-08-11 5:09:23 PM  
I live in Springfield and yeah this stuff is just stupid trust me the school is taking a ton of flak.
 
2020-08-11 5:10:10 PM  
Shiat, they can make my kid wear whatever they require, her computer is in the livingroom.

Me on the other hand, if I walk behind her in my sleeper shorts, that's they're f'n problem.  My damned house, don't like it, turn off the cam.
 
2020-08-11 5:10:36 PM  
*their*

/fark 2020
 
2020-08-11 5:15:07 PM  
Good f***ing luck with that, lol
 
2020-08-11 5:17:33 PM  

AngryTeacher: Listen, as a principal, I believe the no pajama rule is stupid. I once worked in a school that had a dress code that listed what kind of socks a kid could wear.  The principal would come in with a quarter and if he could not cover up the entire logo, the kid was sent home.  It was a giant waste of time and resources.  Now that I am a principal, I wonder how he had the time to do something like that.

But let's be honest, this is not about wearing pajama pants and a t-shirt.  This rule is talking about those adult onesies with animal heads as the hood. (I'm not about to do an image search for "adult onesie" at work.) All this could have been avoided by saying something like, Students should wear clothes appropriate for learning.  95% of the kids will comply. The 5% could be dealt with individually and this would not be a big deal.


I'm 40 and went to Catholic school. I really think that strict a dress code is left over from WWII and Vietnam vet type teachers, etc.
 
2020-08-11 5:17:50 PM  
Every time I hear that expression I crack up.

I had never heard it before the guy the green-screens & parodies the "Real People" Chevy commercials and adds in parts.

/ Looking for spoof...
 
2020-08-11 5:23:15 PM  
When I was in HS the first year they had a sort of dress code. By the time I graduated it was "look. just show up, okay? that is all we ask."

This paved the way for the great mini skirt and cleavage wars. There seemed to be a contest as to who has the shortest skirt (or shorts) and most cleavage.

The early 70s was a glorious time to be in HS. Glorious, indeed.
 
2020-08-11 5:23:16 PM  

beezeltown: Okay, party in front, business in the back, then.
[i.pinimg.com image 415x520]


aka the Tony Hawk Squeeb

menhairstylesworld.comView Full Size
 
2020-08-11 5:24:07 PM  
No Underoos?
 
2020-08-11 5:24:12 PM  
For my school, the biggest story was needing to remind a parent to put pants on in the background.  As long as the kids are dressed in any kind of outerwear, assuming they even have their cameras turned on, we're good.
 
2020-08-11 5:24:40 PM  
Fark dress codes.
 
2020-08-11 5:24:57 PM  
Just glad they are still alive and they logged in to class
 
2020-08-11 5:25:15 PM  
I say make kids who are assholes in Zoom meetings go to physical school with all the other assholes. They can infect eeach other and rid the world of the next generation of assholes. Assholes.

Also, you don't need trousers, slacks, or dungarees to learn new stuff. Really, you just have to not be an asshole.
 
2020-08-11 5:30:46 PM  
Oh look, private spaces are not public spaces. Who knew?
 
2020-08-11 5:34:47 PM  
Wait...hold on...

I went to high school in the 90s and girls wore pajamas to class for a couple years, as a trend.

And when I was in undergrad, men and women both came to class and the library in their pj's, directly from rez, which was usually the building next door, on campus.

What's the big prob?
 
2020-08-11 5:40:21 PM  
I'm all for my kids wearing pajamas.  Less laundry for me to do.
 
2020-08-11 5:45:57 PM  

AngryTeacher: Listen, as a principal, I believe the no pajama rule is stupid. I once worked in a school that had a dress code that listed what kind of socks a kid could wear.  The principal would come in with a quarter and if he could not cover up the entire logo, the kid was sent home.  It was a giant waste of time and resources.  Now that I am a principal, I wonder how he had the time to do something like that.

But let's be honest, this is not about wearing pajama pants and a t-shirt.  This rule is talking about those adult onesies with animal heads as the hood. (I'm not about to do an image search for "adult onesie" at work.) All this could have been avoided by saying something like, Students should wear clothes appropriate for learning.  95% of the kids will comply. The 5% could be dealt with individually and this would not be a big deal.


How does an animal adult onesie impede learning?

Every time school administration gets in a twist over something inconsequential they claim it's a disruption, but the other kids never actually care. The only people being disrupted are teachers and administrators who are hypersensitive to signs of youthful rebellion.
 
2020-08-11 5:47:36 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
This guy is my all time hero. Inventor of the Skullet, I aspire to be like him someday but it will take years of intense training.
 
2020-08-11 5:52:59 PM  

jimmythrust: I say make kids who are assholes in Zoom meetings go to physical school with all the other assholes. They can infect eeach other and rid the world of the next generation of assholes. Assholes.

Also, you don't need trousers, slacks, or dungarees to learn new stuff. Really, you just have to not be an asshole.


You say asshole a lot
 
2020-08-11 6:30:04 PM  
"Masks are not required for in-person classes because such a mandate would be impossible to enforce."

"If I see My Little Pony pajamas in that thumbnail Zoom pic your ass is suspended!"
 
2020-08-11 6:33:40 PM  
shouldn't we be thankful they are wearing clothes?

have you seen what student bodies wear?  or rather do not wear?

what happens when a 15 sophomore whips out the goods during a zoom meeting?  does everyone need to be arrested for involvement of child porn?

The Problem with Jeggings
Youtube kPJz850ibII
 
2020-08-11 6:40:59 PM  

JesseL: AngryTeacher: Listen, as a principal, I believe the no pajama rule is stupid. I once worked in a school that had a dress code that listed what kind of socks a kid could wear.  The principal would come in with a quarter and if he could not cover up the entire logo, the kid was sent home.  It was a giant waste of time and resources.  Now that I am a principal, I wonder how he had the time to do something like that.

But let's be honest, this is not about wearing pajama pants and a t-shirt.  This rule is talking about those adult onesies with animal heads as the hood. (I'm not about to do an image search for "adult onesie" at work.) All this could have been avoided by saying something like, Students should wear clothes appropriate for learning.  95% of the kids will comply. The 5% could be dealt with individually and this would not be a big deal.

How does an animal adult onesie impede learning?

Every time school administration gets in a twist over something inconsequential they claim it's a disruption, but the other kids never actually care. The only people being disrupted are teachers and administrators who are hypersensitive to signs of youthful rebellion.


I'm with you.  I personally think that an overly strict dress code leads to kids trying to get around the rules.  In my example with the socks, it then led to kids wear colorful shoes, When the rule was 90% white or black shoes, I literally had students with checkered vans color in 10% of the white spaces with bright colors.  They did the math.  After that, the rule was changed to solid color shoes.  Kids then wore colorful shoelaces.  All this was because the principal had a rule that logos on socks could not be larger than a quarter.  It was so much wasted time coming up with and enforcing the rules. Imagine being a student while a teacher is forced to determine if 10% or 11% of your shoe is brightly colored. It led to distrust.

The animal adult onesie is only worn by people who want attention.  If you don't make a big deal, they will eventually realize that it is uncomfortable to sit in an ill-fitting, hot outfit and eventually change into typical clothes.
 
2020-08-11 6:46:06 PM  

AngryTeacher: Listen, as a principal, I believe the no pajama rule is stupid. I once worked in a school that had a dress code that listed what kind of socks a kid could wear.  The principal would come in with a quarter and if he could not cover up the entire logo, the kid was sent home.  It was a giant waste of time and resources.  Now that I am a principal, I wonder how he had the time to do something like that.

But let's be honest, this is not about wearing pajama pants and a t-shirt.  This rule is talking about those adult onesies with animal heads as the hood. (I'm not about to do an image search for "adult onesie" at work.) All this could have been avoided by saying something like, Students should wear clothes appropriate for learning.  95% of the kids will comply. The 5% could be dealt with individually and this would not be a big deal.


Man, I was with you until you started talking about onesies and noncompliance. fark, being a principal is like being a cop, huh? They just lobotomize you and fill your skull with feces? farking admin, tripping all over itself to solve a problem no one has.

As a teacher, why do I even give a fark if they wear a onesie? Do you actually think we're going to get their undivided attention while they sit at home with easy access to porn in another window? Do you actually think parents will hang around and keep them in line for us? Do you really think we have time to constantly scan video feeds for pjs? Jesus christ, I wouldn't give a damn if they show up in sequined boots and a cape to an actual classroom as long as they sit down and shut the fark up. Just once I'd like to hear a principal or superintendent finish a paragraph without revealing their neurotic need to be in control of other people.

The answer here wasn't to reword the rulebook, it was to mind your own goddamn business. Clothing rules: Wear some. DONE.

Jesus fark. Stupid.
 
2020-08-11 7:11:29 PM  
Also... Guys who listened to Korn, White Zombie, and Monster Magnet, used to be Total Wooks, wearing plaid pajama pants to school. Granted, Zoom doesn't have a setting for the reek of patchouli oil -- but if teachers didn't give a shiat then, I don't see why they should give a shiat now.
 
2020-08-11 7:21:34 PM  
Must have some control!
 
2020-08-11 7:25:17 PM  
I sleep in teh nood! Also I'd like to attend school in Illinois!
 
2020-08-11 7:30:27 PM  
Remember, this is school! No free thinking!
 
gcc [TotalFark]
2020-08-11 7:50:20 PM  

AngryTeacher: Listen, as a principal, I believe the no pajama rule is stupid. I once worked in a school that had a dress code that listed what kind of socks a kid could wear.  The principal would come in with a quarter and if he could not cover up the entire logo, the kid was sent home.  It was a giant waste of time and resources.  Now that I am a principal, I wonder how he had the time to do something like that.

But let's be honest, this is not about wearing pajama pants and a t-shirt.  This rule is talking about those adult onesies with animal heads as the hood. (I'm not about to do an image search for "adult onesie" at work.) All this could have been avoided by saying something like, Students should wear clothes appropriate for learning.  95% of the kids will comply. The 5% could be dealt with individually and this would not be a big deal.


I once got a detention because my socks weren't the appropriate color of maroon. In that detention I was expected to write an essay detailing my crime, my apology for it, and what I would do to improve in the future.

So I wrote about how I was so sad that I would go home, sacrifice a goat to Baal, and dunk white socks in it until they were the appropriate color. Somehow this earned me more detentions, during which I said that I had gotten a detention for writing the essay, repeated it verbatim, and said that I was sorry I got caught and that in the future I would try to get detentions with <insert name of principal> because I didn't think they could read.

They literally didn't let me out of detention until the end of the school year, and would have kept it going except they assumed I would fail summer school and not be their problem anymore anyway.

So, while I'm glad you have a more enlightened approach, I'm not sure I would count on individual attention yielding 100% compliance.
 
2020-08-11 8:14:04 PM  

saturn badger: When I was in HS the first year they had a sort of dress code. By the time I graduated it was "look. just show up, okay? that is all we ask."

This paved the way for the great mini skirt and cleavage wars. There seemed to be a contest as to who has the shortest skirt (or shorts) and most cleavage.

The early 70s was a glorious time to be in HS. Glorious, indeed.


I'm sorry, what were you saying?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-11 8:49:13 PM  

JesseL: AngryTeacher: Listen, as a principal, I believe the no pajama rule is stupid. I once worked in a school that had a dress code that listed what kind of socks a kid could wear.  The principal would come in with a quarter and if he could not cover up the entire logo, the kid was sent home.  It was a giant waste of time and resources.  Now that I am a principal, I wonder how he had the time to do something like that.

But let's be honest, this is not about wearing pajama pants and a t-shirt.  This rule is talking about those adult onesies with animal heads as the hood. (I'm not about to do an image search for "adult onesie" at work.) All this could have been avoided by saying something like, Students should wear clothes appropriate for learning.  95% of the kids will comply. The 5% could be dealt with individually and this would not be a big deal.

How does an animal adult onesie impede learning?

Every time school administration gets in a twist over something inconsequential they claim it's a disruption, but the other kids never actually care. The only people being disrupted are teachers and administrators who are hypersensitive to signs of youthful rebellion.


This.  It's nothing but an arbitrary form of control to make the administration feel better.  Letting the students dress how they want would do a lot to foster amity between administration and students, and it would make them more comfortable, which would be a far more conducive learning environment than enforcing stupid dress policy that has no actual bearing on anything.

/sure, make sure genital/butt areas and nipples are covered.
/but miss me with that sexist "boys are distracted by your bare legs and shoulders" nonsense.
 
2020-08-11 9:20:05 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size

NO PANTS!
 
2020-08-12 12:33:33 AM  

exqqqme: saturn badger: When I was in HS the first year they had a sort of dress code. By the time I graduated it was "look. just show up, okay? that is all we ask."

This paved the way for the great mini skirt and cleavage wars. There seemed to be a contest as to who has the shortest skirt (or shorts) and most cleavage.

The early 70s was a glorious time to be in HS. Glorious, indeed.

I'm sorry, what were you saying?

[Fark user image 425x513]


Who wears short shorts?

They wear short shorts!
 
2020-08-12 2:06:32 AM  
"Enforcing existing dress code is bad" seems like a useless hill to the on, if the kids already go to that school.
 
2020-08-12 2:50:43 AM  
Everyone saying this rule is stupid will be demanding that their child be allowed to wear pajamas to in-person school next year, right?

If someone can see you (in a non-spying context), then at least the part of you that's visible needs to be in attire that's appropriate for the situation.
 
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