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(Yahoo)   What do do with all those dying malls? Turn them into Amazon Fulfillment Centers, of course   (news.yahoo.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Retailing, giant Amazon fulfillment centers, retail space, Shopping mall, Simon Property Group, biggest mall owner, Online shopping, part of the deal  
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598 clicks; posted to Business » on 09 Aug 2020 at 9:53 PM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-08-09 8:41:49 PM  
Amazon is the Buy-N-Large from Wall-E.
 
2020-08-09 8:53:27 PM  
TFA says they wouldn't bring in customers to the mall but (a) neither are the empty stores now, or the virtually empty Sears stores now and (b) if you have an Amazon warehouse there then have a storefront for customers to pick stuff up instead of having it delivered. It would be more convenient for many customers, and save Amazon the delivery cost and let customers walk in and order there and then.
In the UK Argos is a chain that has no sales floor but a warehouse and a small area where customers browse catalogues and order from a computer screen and someone gets the item and brings it to the collection counter in a couple of minutes. Amazon could easily do that with these centres.
 
2020-08-09 9:14:20 PM  
Service Merchandise went bankrupt far too soon...

/worked back in the warehouse back in the late 80s-early 90s
//actually kind of fun & got some hellacious deals on some 'broken' items
 
zez
2020-08-09 10:00:46 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: TFA says they wouldn't bring in customers to the mall but (a) neither are the empty stores now, or the virtually empty Sears stores now and (b) if you have an Amazon warehouse there then have a storefront for customers to pick stuff up instead of having it delivered. It would be more convenient for many customers, and save Amazon the delivery cost and let customers walk in and order there and then.
In the UK Argos is a chain that has no sales floor but a warehouse and a small area where customers browse catalogues and order from a computer screen and someone gets the item and brings it to the collection counter in a couple of minutes. Amazon could easily do that with these centres.


So you're saying someone could order something from their home and then pick it up from an old Sears Building? That's a great idea! I wonder why Sears didn't run with it?
 
2020-08-09 10:17:57 PM  

Recoil Therapy: Service Merchandise went bankrupt far too soon...

/worked back in the warehouse back in the late 80s-early 90s
//actually kind of fun & got some hellacious deals on some 'broken' items


I've tried to describe Service Merchandise to people and I sound like a crazy person.

"So, there was this store, right?  But you didn't buy things from the shelf. No, you wrote down the stock number, and went to a computer terminal, and placed an order. Then, you went to the back of the store and your purchase came out on an airport baggage carousel. Also, it had automatic doors, but they had touch sensitive rubber pads instead of motion sensors!"

"Did they sell amazing  stuff?"

"Not at all!  But, It was the best place to buy a Garfield phone, a fake jukebox, and a Yamaha keyboard preloaded with Billy Joel songs. Also, they had a catalog, but it didn't have lingerie like Sears and Penny's."
 
2020-08-09 10:24:21 PM  

Izunbacol: Recoil Therapy: Service Merchandise went bankrupt far too soon...

/worked back in the warehouse back in the late 80s-early 90s
//actually kind of fun & got some hellacious deals on some 'broken' items

I've tried to describe Service Merchandise to people and I sound like a crazy person.

"So, there was this store, right?  But you didn't buy things from the shelf. No, you wrote down the stock number, and went to a computer terminal, and placed an order. Then, you went to the back of the store and your purchase came out on an airport baggage carousel. Also, it had automatic doors, but they had touch sensitive rubber pads instead of motion sensors!"

"Did they sell amazing  stuff?"

"Not at all!  But, It was the best place to buy a Garfield phone, a fake jukebox, and a Yamaha keyboard preloaded with Billy Joel songs. Also, they had a catalog, but it didn't have lingerie like Sears and Penny's."


Yeah, that was pretty much it.

Occasionally (when the supervisor wasn't looking) we'd ride the belt up to the front to deliver the item in person.

/worked there right at the time we got married.
//discovered that our china pattern (decided upon far earlier) was represented there in a 10 place setting box
///I may or may not have slightly 'dented' the corner of a couple of boxes to get the 'broken' discount & returned the individual place settings to JC Penny or wherever was paying the most....
 
2020-08-09 10:24:34 PM  
They'll then also become pickup locations for your order.  They do this already for customers who want this, I don't know who.  I've never done it.
 
2020-08-09 10:38:49 PM  
I'm really looking forward to the Amazon Christmas Wish Book with all of the new toys.
 
2020-08-09 10:39:17 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: TFA says they wouldn't bring in customers to the mall but (a) neither are the empty stores now, or the virtually empty Sears stores now and (b) if you have an Amazon warehouse there then have a storefront for customers to pick stuff up instead of having it delivered. It would be more convenient for many customers, and save Amazon the delivery cost and let customers walk in and order there and then.
In the UK Argos is a chain that has no sales floor but a warehouse and a small area where customers browse catalogues and order from a computer screen and someone gets the item and brings it to the collection counter in a couple of minutes. Amazon could easily do that with these centres.


Sears used to do that...

I watched Woody Woodpecker cartoons in a little booth while my mom waited for her order to be sent up to the desk.
 
2020-08-09 10:40:20 PM  
Oh, and Chilly Willy!

Pardon me, feeling heavily nostalgic this week.
 
2020-08-09 10:42:42 PM  

zez: Carter Pewterschmidt: TFA says they wouldn't bring in customers to the mall but (a) neither are the empty stores now, or the virtually empty Sears stores now and (b) if you have an Amazon warehouse there then have a storefront for customers to pick stuff up instead of having it delivered. It would be more convenient for many customers, and save Amazon the delivery cost and let customers walk in and order there and then.
In the UK Argos is a chain that has no sales floor but a warehouse and a small area where customers browse catalogues and order from a computer screen and someone gets the item and brings it to the collection counter in a couple of minutes. Amazon could easily do that with these centres.

So you're saying someone could order something from their home and then pick it up from an old Sears Building? That's a great idea! I wonder why Sears didn't run with it?


That is one of the biggest business blunders of the twentieth century, along with Xerox giving away the GUI, IBM choosing to use a licenced OS, Yahoo not buying Google for $1 million when they had the chance, every car manufacturer turning down Volkswagen when offered the company for free etc.

Sears had a catalogue sales operation and a huge distribution network for nearly a century. And then just as the internet was taking off they closed the whole business down and closed all their warehouses and distribution centres. They had a huge head start over Amazon, and threw it all away.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-09 10:47:41 PM  
They could put their Amazon lockers there too.  It's not a terrible idea esp if they could combine with same day pickup at a locker.  And accept returns there.
 
2020-08-09 10:49:38 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: TFA says they wouldn't bring in customers to the mall but (a) neither are the empty stores now, or the virtually empty Sears stores now and (b) if you have an Amazon warehouse there then have a storefront for customers to pick stuff up instead of having it delivered. It would be more convenient for many customers, and save Amazon the delivery cost and let customers walk in and order there and then.
In the UK Argos is a chain that has no sales floor but a warehouse and a small area where customers browse catalogues and order from a computer screen and someone gets the item and brings it to the collection counter in a couple of minutes. Amazon could easily do that with these centres.


This was the Consumers Distributing model for years.  I hated that place so much as a kid, as they'd send out a catalog each year showing all the toys (and other stuff, but as a kid I didn't care about the other stuff) you could theoretically get from them, but could never actually get from them because they were always out of stock.  When they finally went under, my heart was filled with joy.

I assume Amazon would avoid the worst part of the stock issues by allowing you to specify which location you're currently at or near on their website, so you wouldn't have to deal with the "Sorry.  Try again next week" stock issues Consumers Distributing had.
 
2020-08-09 10:58:58 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: zez: Carter Pewterschmidt: TFA says they wouldn't bring in customers to the mall but (a) neither are the empty stores now, or the virtually empty Sears stores now and (b) if you have an Amazon warehouse there then have a storefront for customers to pick stuff up instead of having it delivered. It would be more convenient for many customers, and save Amazon the delivery cost and let customers walk in and order there and then.
In the UK Argos is a chain that has no sales floor but a warehouse and a small area where customers browse catalogues and order from a computer screen and someone gets the item and brings it to the collection counter in a couple of minutes. Amazon could easily do that with these centres.

So you're saying someone could order something from their home and then pick it up from an old Sears Building? That's a great idea! I wonder why Sears didn't run with it?

That is one of the biggest business blunders of the twentieth century, along with Xerox giving away the GUI, IBM choosing to use a licenced OS, Yahoo not buying Google for $1 million when they had the chance, every car manufacturer turning down Volkswagen when offered the company for free etc.

Sears had a catalogue sales operation and a huge distribution network for nearly a century. And then just as the internet was taking off they closed the whole business down and closed all their warehouses and distribution centres. They had a huge head start over Amazon, and threw it all away.

[Fark user image image 245x245]


Sears was also part owner of Prodigy. They could have done online sales, and been way ahead of their time. Sears had all the pieces to have been an online giant, but they pulled defeat from the jaws of victory.
 
2020-08-09 10:59:18 PM  
This is the ultimate irony.

Sears, which already had a massive nationwide mail-order network, refused to embrace the internet until they were already circling the drain. They could have smothered Amazon while it was still in the crib. And now, Amazon is going to move into the empty husks of the Sears stores to continue perfecting the Sears business model that they embraced after Sears tossed it away to worry more about year over year in-store numbers during the rise of e-commerce
 
2020-08-09 11:02:11 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: zez: Carter Pewterschmidt: TFA says they wouldn't bring in customers to the mall but (a) neither are the empty stores now, or the virtually empty Sears stores now and (b) if you have an Amazon warehouse there then have a storefront for customers to pick stuff up instead of having it delivered. It would be more convenient for many customers, and save Amazon the delivery cost and let customers walk in and order there and then.
In the UK Argos is a chain that has no sales floor but a warehouse and a small area where customers browse catalogues and order from a computer screen and someone gets the item and brings it to the collection counter in a couple of minutes. Amazon could easily do that with these centres.

So you're saying someone could order something from their home and then pick it up from an old Sears Building? That's a great idea! I wonder why Sears didn't run with it?

That is one of the biggest business blunders of the twentieth century, along with Xerox giving away the GUI, IBM choosing to use a licenced OS, Yahoo not buying Google for $1 million when they had the chance, every car manufacturer turning down Volkswagen when offered the company for free etc.

Sears had a catalogue sales operation and a huge distribution network for nearly a century. And then just as the internet was taking off they closed the whole business down and closed all their warehouses and distribution centres. They had a huge head start over Amazon, and threw it all away.

[Fark user image 245x245] [View Full Size image _x_]


It's such a colossal blunder that it's kind-of great. Because, at the time, it was the *right thing to do*. They were losing lots of money on the catalog. People no longer had an interest in buying things that way - the mid 90s was HUGE for brick-and-mortar retail. We were in an economic boom, after all.

And then...the internet.

It's hard to blame Sears, really. But, like most stores, they should've ramped-up online sales like CRAZY as soon as Amazon started to get huge. None of them did. They thought that they were safe.
 
2020-08-09 11:08:34 PM  

The Tony Danzas: Carter Pewterschmidt: TFA says they wouldn't bring in customers to the mall but (a) neither are the empty stores now, or the virtually empty Sears stores now and (b) if you have an Amazon warehouse there then have a storefront for customers to pick stuff up instead of having it delivered. It would be more convenient for many customers, and save Amazon the delivery cost and let customers walk in and order there and then.
In the UK Argos is a chain that has no sales floor but a warehouse and a small area where customers browse catalogues and order from a computer screen and someone gets the item and brings it to the collection counter in a couple of minutes. Amazon could easily do that with these centres.

This was the Consumers Distributing model for years.  I hated that place so much as a kid, as they'd send out a catalog each year showing all the toys (and other stuff, but as a kid I didn't care about the other stuff) you could theoretically get from them, but could never actually get from them because they were always out of stock.  When they finally went under, my heart was filled with joy.

I assume Amazon would avoid the worst part of the stock issues by allowing you to specify which location you're currently at or near on their website, so you wouldn't have to deal with the "Sorry.  Try again next week" stock issues Consumers Distributing had.


Back in the eighties when I was young I thought about moving back to Canada and while there on holiday had an interview and was actually offered a job at Consumer Distributing in Toronto. I'd never heard of them but they were the same as Argos, which was big in the UK.
Argos was originally Green Shield Stamps, where you got thousands of stamps when you bought stuff in stores, petrol stations etc. You stuck them in a book and then went to their store and paid for stuff with books full of stamps. It was an early version of store loyalty cards. Eventually they scrapped the stamps but kept their stores.
Today they're competing with Amazon, and you can buy stuff from their stores and get them delivered the same day, only a few hours after you ordered them. Even faster than Amazon's next day delivery.
 
2020-08-09 11:09:50 PM  
This story comes up every single year whenever there is a glut of commercial real estate and besides a warehouse popping up here and there, it has never come to fruition. Hell, Amazon doesn't even know what the fark it is doing with Whole Foods (I imagine they will be converted to generic Amazon grocery stores eventually as Whole Foods has lost its niche.)
 
2020-08-09 11:41:49 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: zez: Carter Pewterschmidt: TFA says they wouldn't bring in customers to the mall but (a) neither are the empty stores now, or the virtually empty Sears stores now and (b) if you have an Amazon warehouse there then have a storefront for customers to pick stuff up instead of having it delivered. It would be more convenient for many customers, and save Amazon the delivery cost and let customers walk in and order there and then.
In the UK Argos is a chain that has no sales floor but a warehouse and a small area where customers browse catalogues and order from a computer screen and someone gets the item and brings it to the collection counter in a couple of minutes. Amazon could easily do that with these centres.

So you're saying someone could order something from their home and then pick it up from an old Sears Building? That's a great idea! I wonder why Sears didn't run with it?

That is one of the biggest business blunders of the twentieth century, along with Xerox giving away the GUI, IBM choosing to use a licenced OS, Yahoo not buying Google for $1 million when they had the chance, every car manufacturer turning down Volkswagen when offered the company for free etc.

Sears had a catalogue sales operation and a huge distribution network for nearly a century. And then just as the internet was taking off they closed the whole business down and closed all their warehouses and distribution centres. They had a huge head start over Amazon, and threw it all away.

[Fark user image 245x245] [View Full Size image _x_]


Xerox obtained 100,000 shares of Apple in exchange:

https://web.stanford.edu/dept/SUL/sit​e​s/mac/parc.html
 
2020-08-09 11:53:29 PM  

realmolo: Carter Pewterschmidt: zez: Carter Pewterschmidt: TFA says they wouldn't bring in customers to the mall but (a) neither are the empty stores now, or the virtually empty Sears stores now and (b) if you have an Amazon warehouse there then have a storefront for customers to pick stuff up instead of having it delivered. It would be more convenient for many customers, and save Amazon the delivery cost and let customers walk in and order there and then.
In the UK Argos is a chain that has no sales floor but a warehouse and a small area where customers browse catalogues and order from a computer screen and someone gets the item and brings it to the collection counter in a couple of minutes. Amazon could easily do that with these centres.

So you're saying someone could order something from their home and then pick it up from an old Sears Building? That's a great idea! I wonder why Sears didn't run with it?

That is one of the biggest business blunders of the twentieth century, along with Xerox giving away the GUI, IBM choosing to use a licenced OS, Yahoo not buying Google for $1 million when they had the chance, every car manufacturer turning down Volkswagen when offered the company for free etc.

Sears had a catalogue sales operation and a huge distribution network for nearly a century. And then just as the internet was taking off they closed the whole business down and closed all their warehouses and distribution centres. They had a huge head start over Amazon, and threw it all away.

[Fark user image 245x245] [View Full Size image _x_]

It's such a colossal blunder that it's kind-of great. Because, at the time, it was the *right thing to do*. They were losing lots of money on the catalog. People no longer had an interest in buying things that way - the mid 90s was HUGE for brick-and-mortar retail. We were in an economic boom, after all.

And then...the internet.

It's hard to blame Sears, really. But, like most stores, they should've ramped-up online sales like CRAZY as ...


None of the brick and mortar retailers will ever be able to compete with Amazon.  Even mighty the Walmart cannot make money selling on the internet and they have been trying for 25 years.
Fark user imageView Full Size


#5 - #10 total only 8%.
 
2020-08-10 12:00:53 AM  

Secret Troll Alt: This is the ultimate irony.

Sears, which already had a massive nationwide mail-order network, refused to embrace the internet until they were already circling the drain. They could have smothered Amazon while it was still in the crib. And now, Amazon is going to move into the empty husks of the Sears stores to continue perfecting the Sears business model that they embraced after Sears tossed it away to worry more about year over year in-store numbers during the rise of e-commerce


Well, Sears had been successfully stagnant for so long.

They didn't know HOW to even look at technology.

Not long after 9/11 I took a sales associate job. Appliances. Solid sales commissions. I pick my hrs.  I could match a good bartenders take on a good week.

Our registers were from the 80s (maybe early 90s). Monochrome, all cli, token ring cards.

Now, I had a "modern" computer that I could allegedy use to go to sears.com and show people additional specs, things not on the floor.

Slowest piece of shiat ever. 800x600 res screen, you could only see a part of any farking page you brought up. That's if the website wasn't broken.

Sears died for the same reason old dogs do. Age gets the best of all of us eventually.
 
2020-08-10 12:08:55 AM  
The headline is do do.
 
2020-08-10 12:18:59 AM  
They could store their most popular items there, and people could go there and pick them up right in their own neighborhood without having to place an order ahead of time.  It'll revolutionize the shopping experience.
 
2020-08-10 12:23:38 AM  
There's a couple of second- (or third-, or fourth-) tier malls around here where the parking lots are all pretty much empty except for Amazon Sprinter vans. It's eerie.
 
2020-08-10 12:34:19 AM  

Jclark666: They could store their most popular items there, and people could go there and pick them up right in their own neighborhood without having to place an order ahead of time.  It'll revolutionize the shopping experience.


Yeah, they could just be making Amazon brick and mortar stores. ;)
 
2020-08-10 1:35:38 AM  

Izunbacol: Recoil Therapy: Service Merchandise went bankrupt far too soon...

/worked back in the warehouse back in the late 80s-early 90s
//actually kind of fun & got some hellacious deals on some 'broken' items

I've tried to describe Service Merchandise to people and I sound like a crazy person.

"So, there was this store, right?  But you didn't buy things from the shelf. No, you wrote down the stock number, and went to a computer terminal, and placed an order. Then, you went to the back of the store and your purchase came out on an airport baggage carousel. Also, it had automatic doors, but they had touch sensitive rubber pads instead of motion sensors!"

"Did they sell amazing  stuff?"

"Not at all!  But, It was the best place to buy a Garfield phone, a fake jukebox, and a Yamaha keyboard preloaded with Billy Joel songs. Also, they had a catalog, but it didn't have lingerie like Sears and Penny's."


That's how Argos works, except your order is brought out to you by employees working behind a counter.
 
2020-08-10 1:38:37 AM  
I'm a couple years younger than the kids were in Stranger Things but we had the same sort of adventures, without the monsters. Or the girls, We used to ride our bikes to the mall and sneak into R rated movies. I dunno, it kind of sucks if malls are going away. Although the mall near me was packed today so I don't think they're totally dead. I keep getting farked when I order things online. And I'm a DBA at Amazon so I know how much they suck.

"Let me give you guys some friendly piece of advice, ok? They fark you at Amazon, ok? They fark you at Amazon. They know their truck is going to be miles away before you find out you got farked. Oh who gets farked. Well I don't give a fark, I'm not eating this tuna and I'm not taking this Atari 2600 when I ordered a 26 gigabyte NVIDIA Geforce Optiplex."

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-10 5:48:16 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-10 6:07:07 AM  

MBZ321: This story comes up every single year whenever there is a glut of commercial real estate and besides a warehouse popping up here and there, it has never come to fruition. Hell, Amazon doesn't even know what the fark it is doing with Whole Foods (I imagine they will be converted to generic Amazon grocery stores eventually as Whole Foods has lost its niche.)


In NEPA, Amazon has distribution center. Every couple of hours, caravans of delivery vans leave. It looks like an army deployment with blue vans. The ducks seem to be a row here.
 
2020-08-10 7:42:20 AM  

TedCruz'sCrazyDad: Carter Pewterschmidt: zez: Carter Pewterschmidt: TFA says they wouldn't bring in customers to the mall but (a) neither are the empty stores now, or the virtually empty Sears stores now and (b) if you have an Amazon warehouse there then have a storefront for customers to pick stuff up instead of having it delivered. It would be more convenient for many customers, and save Amazon the delivery cost and let customers walk in and order there and then.
In the UK Argos is a chain that has no sales floor but a warehouse and a small area where customers browse catalogues and order from a computer screen and someone gets the item and brings it to the collection counter in a couple of minutes. Amazon could easily do that with these centres.

So you're saying someone could order something from their home and then pick it up from an old Sears Building? That's a great idea! I wonder why Sears didn't run with it?

That is one of the biggest business blunders of the twentieth century, along with Xerox giving away the GUI, IBM choosing to use a licenced OS, Yahoo not buying Google for $1 million when they had the chance, every car manufacturer turning down Volkswagen when offered the company for free etc.

Sears had a catalogue sales operation and a huge distribution network for nearly a century. And then just as the internet was taking off they closed the whole business down and closed all their warehouses and distribution centres. They had a huge head start over Amazon, and threw it all away.

[Fark user image 245x245] [View Full Size image _x_]

Xerox obtained 100,000 shares of Apple in exchange:

https://web.stanford.edu/dept/SUL/site​s/mac/parc.html


Your own link agrees with me. Xerox showed the GUI to everyone, not just Apple. Instead of developing and building machines themselves. Even the value of those shares is peanuts compared to the values of Apple and Microsoft added together which is arguably what they gave away. Xerox could have owned the entire PC market to this day. They could have beaten IBM to the PC, and owned the OS and the patents, so clones like Compaq would never have been able to exist and with Xerox beating Apple to a GUI machine both the Macintosh and Lisa would have failed.
100,000 shares in return for that is selling Manhattan for some shiny beads.
 
2020-08-10 7:46:28 AM  

Gordon Bennett: Izunbacol: Recoil Therapy: Service Merchandise went bankrupt far too soon...

/worked back in the warehouse back in the late 80s-early 90s
//actually kind of fun & got some hellacious deals on some 'broken' items

I've tried to describe Service Merchandise to people and I sound like a crazy person.

"So, there was this store, right?  But you didn't buy things from the shelf. No, you wrote down the stock number, and went to a computer terminal, and placed an order. Then, you went to the back of the store and your purchase came out on an airport baggage carousel. Also, it had automatic doors, but they had touch sensitive rubber pads instead of motion sensors!"

"Did they sell amazing  stuff?"

"Not at all!  But, It was the best place to buy a Garfield phone, a fake jukebox, and a Yamaha keyboard preloaded with Billy Joel songs. Also, they had a catalog, but it didn't have lingerie like Sears and Penny's."

That's how Argos works, except your order is brought out to you by employees working behind a counter.


I saw an Argos in England in 2005-ish and thought "Wow, Service Merchandise still exists over here!"  The biggest difference was that Argos shops were small.  Service Merchandise was the size of a large department store already.

I also vaguely remember that Service Merchandise was called Wilson's in the early 80's (I was a little kid then).  My parents liked the store, and took a few years to stop calling it "Wilson's" after the name changed.
 
2020-08-10 7:54:07 AM  
Thats the current rumor floating around  Century Plaza in Birmingham
Place has been shut down for a few years
Last year Honda? put a fence around the place and filled up the parking lot with new cars
 
2020-08-10 7:58:57 AM  

MurphyMurphy: Secret Troll Alt: This is the ultimate irony.

Sears, which already had a massive nationwide mail-order network, refused to embrace the internet until they were already circling the drain. They could have smothered Amazon while it was still in the crib. And now, Amazon is going to move into the empty husks of the Sears stores to continue perfecting the Sears business model that they embraced after Sears tossed it away to worry more about year over year in-store numbers during the rise of e-commerce

Well, Sears had been successfully stagnant for so long.

They didn't know HOW to even look at technology.

Not long after 9/11 I took a sales associate job. Appliances. Solid sales commissions. I pick my hrs.  I could match a good bartenders take on a good week.

Our registers were from the 80s (maybe early 90s). Monochrome, all cli, token ring cards.

Now, I had a "modern" computer that I could allegedy use to go to sears.com and show people additional specs, things not on the floor.

Slowest piece of shiat ever. 800x600 res screen, you could only see a part of any farking page you brought up. That's if the website wasn't broken.

Sears died for the same reason old dogs do. Age gets the best of all of us eventually.


It gets even more boggling when you remember that Sears had its own credit card network (Discover) and was partial owner of a massive walled-garden ISP (Prodigy), and sold them off in 1993, and 1996 respectively.  The catalog business was shut down in 1993.  In three years, Sears disassembled every piece they needed to be Amazon, and instead focused on brick and mortar.  If Sears were Pac-man it would chase the ghosts.
 
2020-08-10 8:40:03 AM  

Izunbacol: It gets even more boggling when you remember that Sears had its own credit card network (Discover) and was partial owner of a massive walled-garden ISP (Prodigy), and sold them off in 1993, and 1996 respectively.  The catalog business was shut down in 1993.  In three years, Sears disassembled every piece they needed to be Amazon, and instead focused on brick and mortar.  If Sears were Pac-man it would chase the ghosts.


They could have been Amazon and Paypal....
 
2020-08-10 9:11:30 AM  
Most are too small or multi story which Amazon wouldn't like. Access to highways for all the trucks could be a problem too.
 
2020-08-10 10:23:30 AM  
I really don't understand how no company has successfully implemented "order online, pick up in store". Maybe with the pandemic some companies have fixed it.

A lot of companies, you'd order online and then go to the store and they never even tried to pull the item until you got there. So you'd get there and they'd go try to find the item, successfully or unsuccessfully. It was faster to try to shop yourself.
Walmart had a particularly horrible system where the price online didn't match the price in store.

The only one who seemed partially competent at it was Target- but they never had enough staff working, so again, it was faster to just go shop yourself unless you were ordering a lot or super specific items (I used it a few times picking up presents off a registry, then you know you didn't get the wrong item).

I mean, seriously- Amazon is fast, but not as fast as stopping at a store on your way home from work.
 
zez
2020-08-10 11:00:02 AM  

Katie98_KT: I really don't understand how no company has successfully implemented "order online, pick up in store". Maybe with the pandemic some companies have fixed it.

A lot of companies, you'd order online and then go to the store and they never even tried to pull the item until you got there. So you'd get there and they'd go try to find the item, successfully or unsuccessfully. It was faster to try to shop yourself.
Walmart had a particularly horrible system where the price online didn't match the price in store.

The only one who seemed partially competent at it was Target- but they never had enough staff working, so again, it was faster to just go shop yourself unless you were ordering a lot or super specific items (I used it a few times picking up presents off a registry, then you know you didn't get the wrong item).

I mean, seriously- Amazon is fast, but not as fast as stopping at a store on your way home from work.


Microcenter is good with that. I use it all the time because it's damn near impossible to find an item on a shelf or see how much it costs.
 
2020-08-10 12:00:50 PM  

Izunbacol: MurphyMurphy: Secret Troll Alt: This is the ultimate irony.

Sears, which already had a massive nationwide mail-order network, refused to embrace the internet until they were already circling the drain. They could have smothered Amazon while it was still in the crib. And now, Amazon is going to move into the empty husks of the Sears stores to continue perfecting the Sears business model that they embraced after Sears tossed it away to worry more about year over year in-store numbers during the rise of e-commerce

Well, Sears had been successfully stagnant for so long.

They didn't know HOW to even look at technology.

Not long after 9/11 I took a sales associate job. Appliances. Solid sales commissions. I pick my hrs.  I could match a good bartenders take on a good week.

Our registers were from the 80s (maybe early 90s). Monochrome, all cli, token ring cards.

Now, I had a "modern" computer that I could allegedy use to go to sears.com and show people additional specs, things not on the floor.

Slowest piece of shiat ever. 800x600 res screen, you could only see a part of any farking page you brought up. That's if the website wasn't broken.

Sears died for the same reason old dogs do. Age gets the best of all of us eventually.

It gets even more boggling when you remember that Sears had its own credit card network (Discover) and was partial owner of a massive walled-garden ISP (Prodigy), and sold them off in 1993, and 1996 respectively.  The catalog business was shut down in 1993.  In three years, Sears disassembled every piece they needed to be Amazon, and instead focused on brick and mortar.  If Sears were Pac-man it would chase the ghosts.


Sears also owned Allstate insurance, Caldwell Banker Real Estate, Dean Whittier Brokerages.

But it didn't make financial sense for Sears to pivot to the internet when they made so much money from Sears stores.

Read The Innovators Dilemma by Clayton Christensen, it explains why established businesses will always be disrupted by startups.   It's pretty much the Bible in Silicon Valley.   It's the reason why Apple, Facebook, Google, etc are constantly buying up potential competitors.

The mistake Sears made, was that they did not buy Amazon.
 
2020-08-10 12:07:20 PM  
Amazon just needs to wait and buy the real estate properties from the mall owners. If you look at the average size of a Amazon fulfillment center, they're the size of the entire mall and then some. No way could the put and fulfillment center in a Macy's Or JC Penny's.
 
2020-08-10 12:22:34 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: TFA says they wouldn't bring in customers to the mall but (a) neither are the empty stores now, or the virtually empty Sears stores now and (b) if you have an Amazon warehouse there then have a storefront for customers to pick stuff up instead of having it delivered. It would be more convenient for many customers, and save Amazon the delivery cost and let customers walk in and order there and then.
In the UK Argos is a chain that has no sales floor but a warehouse and a small area where customers browse catalogues and order from a computer screen and someone gets the item and brings it to the collection counter in a couple of minutes. Amazon could easily do that with these centres.


Service Merchandise used to kind of do that. They had a sales floor, but  you could just tell someone what you wanted from the catalog, and they would send it up on a conveyor belt.
 
2020-08-10 2:47:46 PM  

OldJames: Service Merchandise


memegenerator.netView Full Size
 
2020-08-10 3:20:39 PM  
Oh god please no.  I already hate building in brownfield building shells, and malls are poorly maintained nightmare hulks with bad column placement and worse utility runs.

Malls should just be burned to the ground the first time they have a major roof leak.
 
2020-08-10 6:52:37 PM  

Carter Pewterschmidt: customers


agreed. Even if 94% is fulfillment center, if that other 6% is amazon lockers, and an Amazon Go store or "Whole Foods Express" that's a few dozen extra people coming to an otherwise dead mall.
 
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