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(Guardian)   Tom Morello of RATM: It was Jane's Addiction, not Nirvana, who led rock out of the hair metal wilderness. Interesting read about LA Music Shaman Peretz Bernstein   (theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Jane's Addiction, Perry Farrell, Lollapalooza, Red Hot Chili Peppers, time Farrell's next venture, Jane's Addiction frontman, Jane's band Psi Com, late bloomer  
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818 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 07 Aug 2020 at 8:26 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-08-07 5:23:45 AM  
Nirvana got caught stealin'?
 
2020-08-07 6:09:36 AM  
The depressoid wasteland of the 90s was anything but a high point.
 
2020-08-07 6:15:46 AM  
JA, Living Color, and the RHCP actually....
 
2020-08-07 6:39:30 AM  
Wait...uh, where does U2 fall?

Also,  effect of several bands over a few years. JA, Nirvana, Green Day...leaving many out...
 
2020-08-07 7:05:21 AM  
Alice In Chains
 
2020-08-07 7:13:52 AM  
"Every generation gets the Jim Morrison it deserves: Gen X got Perry Farrell." Nailed it.
 
2020-08-07 8:09:20 AM  
That's a bingo.gif...among others, but for me personally Nothing's Shocking was THE album.  Then Tool came along.

Now, it is bands like Mastodon and Devin Townsend...I guess I like real instruments.
 
2020-08-07 8:40:11 AM  
Not even Nirvana would make that claim.

If you asked them back then they would say they're ripping off The Pixies.
 
2020-08-07 8:49:46 AM  
The fark?
 
2020-08-07 8:50:18 AM  
I thought it was Stuart wearing a Winger t shirt on Beavis and Butthead that killed c@ckrock.
 
2020-08-07 8:51:34 AM  

plecos: That's a bingo.gif...among others, but for me personally Nothing's Shocking was THE album.  Then Tool came along.

Now, it is bands like Mastodon and Devin Townsend...I guess I like real instruments.


I saw the DTP open for Gojira and Amorphous and it was amazing and the place was packed like a can of sardines on a Sunday night in NJ which is a feat in inself.
 
2020-08-07 8:53:17 AM  

Marcos P: plecos: That's a bingo.gif...among others, but for me personally Nothing's Shocking was THE album.  Then Tool came along.

Now, it is bands like Mastodon and Devin Townsend...I guess I like real instruments.

I saw the DTP open for Gojira and Amorphous and it was amazing and the place was packed like a can of sardines on a Sunday night in NJ which is a feat in inself.


actually it might not have been Amorphous... I'm so burnt...
 
2020-08-07 8:56:48 AM  
I first heard Ritual when I was 14 and that changed everything about the music I listened to.  Here was a band that didn't suck.  There hadn't been one that I was aware of in some time.  I lived in the sticks and only got hair metal on the radio.
 
2020-08-07 8:57:38 AM  
Nirvana wouldn't be shiat today if it wasn't for Cobain's brutal slaying by Courtney Love.
 
2020-08-07 8:59:39 AM  
I know I'm probably alone here, but I think Jane's Addiction is one of the most overrated bands of all time. Even when their music was new I thought it was at best "meh", bordering on annoying, although I admit I was just a kid then. And I was always completely baffled at the acclaim they had and that they could headline a music festival.
 
2020-08-07 9:02:24 AM  
It was closer to Mother Love Bone but yeah Jane's was in that same universe.
 
2020-08-07 9:10:35 AM  

kryptoknightmare: I know I'm probably alone here, but I think Jane's Addiction is one of the most overrated bands of all time. Even when their music was new I thought it was at best "meh", bordering on annoying, although I admit I was just a kid then. And I was always completely baffled at the acclaim they had and that they could headline a music festival.


I guess you had to be older to appreciate the impact of "Nothing's Shocking". There really was little else like it at the time. Compared to bands like Warrant and Winger and the rest, it was like a difference of night and day.
 
2020-08-07 9:18:40 AM  
Hair metal : Jane's Addiction :: Drum & Bass : Pendulum
 
2020-08-07 9:28:00 AM  
Hair metal was about to collapse of its own excesses anyway in 1991 - Farrell and/or Cobain just happened to have good timing.
What Else Killed Hair Metal?
Youtube mVJvUmXu5zc
 
2020-08-07 9:31:01 AM  

plecos: That's a bingo.gif...among others, but for me personally Nothing's Shocking was THE album.  Then Tool came along.

Now, it is bands like Mastodon and Devin Townsend...I guess I like real instruments.


That video for Sober knocked me on my ass in high school. Sadly, I missed the genius of Aenema the first time around, I had erroneously lumped them in with all the other heavy smack-rock bands of the time. Then Lateralus and hoooly fark it's been a wonderful ride since then, infrequency of studio output notwithstanding.

For all of its faults, 90s music farking ruled.
 
2020-08-07 9:34:53 AM  
Janes Addiction was a fun band to watch in the Hollywood club days. Perry would sing through a guitar pedal board and be twisting the knobs frantically making crazy sounds. It was a trippy if you were a stoner at the time.
 
2020-08-07 9:36:00 AM  

kryptoknightmare: I know I'm probably alone here, but I think Jane's Addiction is one of the most overrated bands of all time. Even when their music was new I thought it was at best "meh", bordering on annoying, although I admit I was just a kid then. And I was always completely baffled at the acclaim they had and that they could headline a music festival.


I think it had a lot to do with T&A. JA was a party band, the music, while lyrically, obviously not, but the music was party music.

That voice tho....like fingernails across a chalkboard. But, I give them tons of credit for the talent that they had. Except for Dave...there are a few but not many are more boring of a lead guitarist than Dave. Which may be why he was able to fill in for RHCP so often..

The music of both, while fantastic, just gets on my nerves after a while.
 
2020-08-07 9:41:55 AM  

Rapmaster2000: I first heard Ritual when I was 14 and that changed everything about the music I listened to.  Here was a band that didn't suck.  There hadn't been one that I was aware of in some time.  I lived in the sticks and only got hair metal on the radio.


I had never heard anything like the B side of Ritual and I was hooked.  Before that I was listening to metal like Metallica, Maiden, Anthrax, etc.  Still listened to them afterwards but JA, RHCP and Nirvana all got me into a whole new genre. I was about the same age as you.  Wasnt a huge fan of hair metal but I liked some Def Leppard and Crue.
 
2020-08-07 9:48:32 AM  

Igor Jakovsky: Rapmaster2000: I first heard Ritual when I was 14 and that changed everything about the music I listened to.  Here was a band that didn't suck.  There hadn't been one that I was aware of in some time.  I lived in the sticks and only got hair metal on the radio.

I had never heard anything like the B side of Ritual and I was hooked.  Before that I was listening to metal like Metallica, Maiden, Anthrax, etc.  Still listened to them afterwards but JA, RHCP and Nirvana all got me into a whole new genre. I was about the same age as you.  Wasnt a huge fan of hair metal but I liked some Def Leppard and Crue.


I was listening to Led Zeppelin and old Aerosmith mostly and not much else because I was so dissatisfied with everyone else.  I listened to Public Enemy more than any other contemporary rock band before JA.
 
2020-08-07 9:53:07 AM  

Ishkur: Not even Nirvana would make that claim.

If you asked them back then they would say they're ripping off The Pixies.


Pretty much. But a lot of people have spent a lot of time theorycrafting about how "arrogant" Nirvana was about their music, so they're locked into the narrative at this point.
 
2020-08-07 9:57:49 AM  

bloobeary: The depressoid wasteland of the 90s was anything but a high point.


The 1990s wasn't nearly as bad as people make it out to be.  Yes yes, grunge and all that, but it also gave us Green Day, The Offspring, Live, Oasis and No Doubt.  There was plenty of upbeat rock during that decade, people just whine because the 80s ended with a wet fart.
 
2020-08-07 9:58:12 AM  
Nirvana is just the face of what killed hair metal. The sum of those that influenced them as well as the social climate of the time actually did it.
 
2020-08-07 10:03:57 AM  
Yeah pretty accurate;  Lollapalooza was what, may 1991?  Nevermind came out in August 1991.  Just as a "Jane's vs Nirvana" discussion, JA beat them (or stated differently, Jane's made a national impact 2-3 months earlier, albeit on a smaller scale.

my fun Jane's story;  the day I got my vasectomy, the doc said when the local anasthetic wore off, I'd be in severe pain and to take the Tylenol 3s.  Local wore off, I felt sore but no pain, per se.  Night came on, I made pizza, put on "Ritual de lo Habitual", got drunk and danced like a madman in my living room with the lights off.  I always loved Jane's but yeah, for some reason Ritual became the soundtrack to me lamenting my ballsack.
 
2020-08-07 10:14:58 AM  
Jesus, I farking HATE '90's musical nostalgia.
 
2020-08-07 10:22:19 AM  
They're all ripping off Pachelbel anyway.

Pachelbel Rant
Youtube JdxkVQy7QLM
 
2020-08-07 10:22:46 AM  

LewDux: Hair metal : Jane's Addiction :: Drum & Bass : Pendulum


No.

Just, no.
 
2020-08-07 10:23:05 AM  

undernova: Jesus, I farking HATE '90's musical nostalgia.


I like your style.  Most everything that was popular from a commercial perspective was an imitation of 80s music from Sonic Youth, Pixies, Minutemen, and the Melvins.

The only original music in the 90s was My Bloody Valentine, Stereolab, and one of the or any of the things Beck was up to.  Maybe Man or Astroman.
 
2020-08-07 10:24:30 AM  

rickythepenguin: Yeah pretty accurate;  Lollapalooza was what, may 1991?  Nevermind came out in August 1991.  Just as a "Jane's vs Nirvana" discussion, JA beat them (or stated differently, Jane's made a national impact 2-3 months earlier, albeit on a smaller scale.

my fun Jane's story;  the day I got my vasectomy, the doc said when the local anasthetic wore off, I'd be in severe pain and to take the Tylenol 3s.  Local wore off, I felt sore but no pain, per se.  Night came on, I made pizza, put on "Ritual de lo Habitual", got drunk and danced like a madman in my living room with the lights off.  I always loved Jane's but yeah, for some reason Ritual became the soundtrack to me lamenting my ballsack.


Mine didn't hurt either. Went to work at the drop zone the next day.
 
2020-08-07 10:28:48 AM  

neongoats: Pretty much. But a lot of people have spent a lot of time theorycrafting about how "arrogant" Nirvana was about their music, so they're locked into the narrative at this point.


They never were. Kris is a dick who left the music industry a long time ago, Dave is just about the most down-to-earth guy you'll ever meet (with a fairly easy-going attitude toward his legacy), and Kurt was, in Noel Gallagher's words "just a sad coont who couldn't handle the fame" which is a harsh way of saying it but it's not wrong. Kurt didn't want the status of visionary or generational icon thrusted upon him, so he took the easy way out.
 
2020-08-07 10:31:33 AM  

Rapmaster2000: The only original music in the 90s was


electronic
 
2020-08-07 10:35:42 AM  
Of all the band break-ups that really depressed me, Jane's breaking up had to be the worst.  I thought after Ritual came out, they were on the verge of real greatness.  And then they just sputtered and Perry Farrell formed Porno for Pyros and said he envisioned something along the lines of the second side to Ritual, but when it dropped it was like the antithesis of the second side of Ritual.  At least I got to see Jane's live before the split up.
 
2020-08-07 10:41:00 AM  
A the time, I thought hair metal was going to stick around but radically changed...

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-07 10:44:23 AM  
Was Guns 'n' Roses the last hair metal band or the first "90s music" band?

Nirvana said they were based on the quiet-LOUD-quiet / LOUD-quiet-LOUD Pixies.

When I was a kid, my first exposure to music was New Kids on the Block and MC Hammer. When I saw the video for Smells Like Teen Spirit, it blew my mind.
 
2020-08-07 10:44:30 AM  

Ishkur: Kurt didn't want the status of visionary or generational icon thrusted [sic] upon him, so he took the easy way out.


I'm pretty sure getting murdered by his estranged wife wasn't in his playbook.
Let's face it: Nirvana, had Kurt lived, would have gone the way of the Beatles: maybe one more mediocre, forgettable yet controversial album, and slowly the solo projects would result in huge gaps between actual releases from the united band. Kurt would have moved on to other random projects and art forms as a functional recluse raising a daughter and trying to outrun his shadow, while the Foo Fighters would eventually rise from the ashes anyway.

We would look at Nirvana the same way we look at Oasis or Smashing Pumpkins.
 
2020-08-07 10:46:01 AM  

Maynard G. Muskievote: plecos: That's a bingo.gif...among others, but for me personally Nothing's Shocking was THE album.  Then Tool came along.

Now, it is bands like Mastodon and Devin Townsend...I guess I like real instruments.

That video for Sober knocked me on my ass in high school. Sadly, I missed the genius of Aenema the first time around, I had erroneously lumped them in with all the other heavy smack-rock bands of the time. Then Lateralus and hoooly fark it's been a wonderful ride since then, infrequency of studio output notwithstanding.

For all of its faults, 90s music farking ruled.


Yep. Saw Jane's for the first time at The Metro in Chicago in '89, senior in high school. Completely turned me on my ass. Follow that up a couple years later seeing Tool on the side stage at Lolla and that was the real game changer. They are awe inspiring live. I was fortunate to see them twice last year. Chicago Open Air Festival where The farking Cult opened for them, then again in November at the United Center. Showed up last minute, got a single ticket from a scalper for a hundred bucks and was seated front row, side stage right across from Adam & Maynard. If that was the last show I ever get to see, I"ll be able to live with that.
Fark user imageView Full Size

Also, Danny Carey is an absolute BEAST!!
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-07 10:46:44 AM  
Love me some JA.  The only song I absolutely cannot stand though is 'Been Caught Stealing'.  It wasn't a great song to begin with but for about a year it was on the radio three times an hour and mtv twice an hour.  It was just beaten to death and they had much better songs.
 
2020-08-07 10:55:05 AM  

bostonguy: Was Guns 'n' Roses the last hair metal band or the first "90s music" band?

Nirvana said they were based on the quiet-LOUD-quiet / LOUD-quiet-LOUD Pixies.

When I was a kid, my first exposure to music was New Kids on the Block and MC Hammer. When I saw the video for Smells Like Teen Spirit, it blew my mind.


The grunge scene from the PNW was already in progress long before the early 90s, but the way Nirvana exploded it into pop culture is what made the difference. There were far better bands in Seattle and elsewhere with similar sounds or even better ones with far less marketable content. Timing is everything. Try to remember that this is around the same time when independent radio stations were tipping over into Clear Channel/I H8 Radio dominance and Grunge/Alternative was almost completely unplayed in any market other than "College Radio" and the Goth/Industrial club scene. Pop music from @ 1987 - 1991 was almost entirely some kind of R&B horse crap like MC Hammer-esque or Boi Band garbage at one end and the Hair "metal" at the other, and R.E.M. was about the only band that broke that barrier as they ran out of ideas and went full mainstream. By the time R.E.M. released "Monster" they had already peaked and went into the downward slide, only having barely squeaked that album into mainstream riding on Grunge's coat tails.

If the current I H8 Radio climate had existed from '91 to '94, Grunge may very well have remained underground and "Hair metal" still would have died a horrible death in a sea of Billy Ray Cyrus and Blackskreet Bois offal. Timing is everything.
 
2020-08-07 10:55:19 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


I can't believe I'm only the second person to mention Guns n' Roses.  Neither Janes's Addiction nor RHCP nor Nirvana had the influence GNR had in the late 80s.  Axl had his hair poofed out in onevideo and after that, it was all street clothes and no hairspray or makeup, which was unheard of for your average non-thrash hard rock band at the time.  Lollapalooza and Nevermind were years later.

They were the true unacknowledged bridge between pre-glam and post-glam.
 
2020-08-07 11:04:11 AM  

STRYPERSWINE: [Fark user image 500x343]

I can't believe I'm only the second person to mention Guns n' Roses.  Neither Janes's Addiction nor RHCP nor Nirvana had the influence GNR had in the late 80s.  Axl had his hair poofed out in onevideo and after that, it was all street clothes and no hairspray or makeup, which was unheard of for your average non-thrash hard rock band at the time.  Lollapalooza and Nevermind were years later.

They were the true unacknowledged bridge between pre-glam and post-glam.


They did stand out musically for a while. I recall that around that time Def Leppard was already turning into a joke, Ratt and Motley Crue were seen as washouts, and the entire list of other "hair" bands was trying to croon their way to success with a warmer, softer, more female-friendly approach to music while G&R was belting out songs about burying the biatch in the back yard and with album covers sporting robots committing rape. G&R was the ultimate "we do NOT give a fark how everyone else is doing it band" at the right place at the right time.
Contrast "Mr. Brownstone" with "More Than Words" or "When the Children Cry", et alia; huuuuuge difference. But in the end you had Use Your Illusion and G&R went soft the same way all the other hair bands did, and the atmosphere towards their earlier works soured quickly and the world moved on once something better was available.

My take even back in 1990 was that people only listened to Guns because there was nothing better to listen to that was actually getting airtime that fed the rebellious spirit of the last of the Gen X kids hitting their late teens.
 
2020-08-07 11:05:03 AM  
Every discussion about 'who killed hair metal' ignores that hair metal had descended into treacly balladry due to absolutely nobody else's fault or influence. Kids that wanted to 'rock' were forced to look elsewhere. Hair metal killed itself
 
2020-08-07 11:05:51 AM  

Rapmaster2000: undernova: Jesus, I farking HATE '90's musical nostalgia.

I like your style.  Most everything that was popular from a commercial perspective was an imitation of 80s music from Sonic Youth, Pixies, Minutemen, and the Melvins.

The only original music in the 90s was My Bloody Valentine, Stereolab, and one of the or any of the things Beck was up to.  Maybe Man or Astroman.


Man or Astroman. Now there's a name I haven't heard in a long time. I remember being about 12 or 13 in ~1993, when my cousin dragged me to one of their shows in a small club. I was a complete neophyte when it came to music; that cousin had gotten me into grunge and punk a year or two before (or at least, I was dipping my toes in the waters). The show was awesome. We hung out with some of the band in an alley next to the club either before or after the show. They were really cool; looking back, it's amazing they were so willing to talk to a couple of 13 year olds. Huge impact on my musical tastes.
 
2020-08-07 11:21:14 AM  
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2020-08-07 11:26:23 AM  

thespindrifter: I'm pretty sure getting murdered by his estranged wife


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-07 11:26:56 AM  
I saw Jane's Addiction in the 80s, opening for Love and Rockets.  I think I still have the poster I stole around here somewhere.

They were terrible live--they were basically cosplaying Aerosmith.  There were eight or ten of us, and we all bailed about five songs in, and went back in for the encore.

/L&R were great, though
 
2020-08-07 11:29:25 AM  

drewogatory: rickythepenguin: Yeah pretty accurate;  Lollapalooza was what, may 1991?  Nevermind came out in August 1991.  Just as a "Jane's vs Nirvana" discussion, JA beat them (or stated differently, Jane's made a national impact 2-3 months earlier, albeit on a smaller scale.

my fun Jane's story;  the day I got my vasectomy, the doc said when the local anasthetic wore off, I'd be in severe pain and to take the Tylenol 3s.  Local wore off, I felt sore but no pain, per se.  Night came on, I made pizza, put on "Ritual de lo Habitual", got drunk and danced like a madman in my living room with the lights off.  I always loved Jane's but yeah, for some reason Ritual became the soundtrack to me lamenting my ballsack.

Mine didn't hurt either. Went to work at the drop zone the next day.


Mine didn't hurt either, at least, not until I didn't follow the doc's advice and had sex about 4 days later. Balls swelled up like a peach. Regretted that decision.

Also, love Jane's Addiction. I think their first album that I believe was recorded live is my favorite. A shout out to Porno For Pyros as well.
 
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