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(Phys Org2)   Pulsing increases the optimum plasma stabilization ... and we're off   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Cool, Nuclear fusion, Tokamak, Fusion power, Plasma, past work, fusion reactions, such problems, Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory  
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406 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Aug 2020 at 8:32 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-08-07 5:16:06 AM  
FTA:  For this process to work, "the pulsing must be done at a rate that is neither too fast nor too slow," she said.


I like to pulse slow at first, but find that the pulsing tends to speed up uncontrollably towards the end.
 
2020-08-07 7:08:42 AM  
What do they have in that thing, a Cuisinart?

/they drink coffee watching radar too probably
 
2020-08-07 8:48:21 AM  
I believe humanity will master fusion. The scientific advancements made over the past 100 years is insane.
Of course there are plenty of people standing in the way of science that we have to worry about.
 
2020-08-07 8:49:43 AM  

I dont want to be on this planet anymore: FTA:  For this process to work, "the pulsing must be done at a rate that is neither too fast nor too slow," she said.


I like to pulse slow at first, but find that the pulsing tends to speed up uncontrollably towards the end.


name checks out
 
2020-08-07 9:20:32 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


This actually makes a lot of sense, it should make it much easier to keep the reaction continuous over longer periods of time. I wrote a paper similar to this in college with the plasma in a sine wave. But I didn't have to do any math or anything else, it was just an "idea" paper in a physics class.
 
2020-08-07 9:46:17 AM  

OldJames: [Fark user image 260x194]

This actually makes a lot of sense, it should make it much easier to keep the reaction continuous over longer periods of time. I wrote a paper similar to this in college with the plasma in a sine wave. But I didn't have to do any math or anything else, it was just an "idea" paper in a physics class.


I put plasma AND gravitons into my waves, but I always use cosines instead of sines, because I like to start on an up note.
 
2020-08-07 10:26:56 AM  
"Such reactions combine light elements in the form of plasma-the state of matter composed of free electrons and atomic nuclei that makes up 99 percent of the visible universe-to generate the massive amounts of energy that drives the sun and stars."

The vast majority of pop-sci articles on fusion research greatly undersell the engineering problem: The core of the Sun is about 15 million Kelvin. The power density of fusion reactions in the Sun's core is in the ballpark of 275 W/m3. If this doesn't sound like much, you're right, it's not. It's comparable to the power output of warm compost, and the human body actually has a much higher power density. The reason that the sun is able to maintain a high heat and total power output simply because it is very big, but numbers like this are not going to be useful for terrestrial power generation.

Which is why the Joint European Torus operates at roughly 150 million Kelvin.

Every pop-sci article on fusion talks about how fusion is what powers the stars, but very few take advantage of the very flashy factoid that fusion reactors target temperatures ten times hotter than the Sun because the Sun's fusion is too wimpy.
 
2020-08-07 10:54:02 AM  
Plasma Rocket
Youtube KVsgSjm_vXg
 
2020-08-07 10:56:16 AM  
URSULA 1000 - Rocket
Youtube E3FGVkIX7dA
 
2020-08-07 11:59:28 AM  
We'll definitely see results in 20 years.
 
2020-08-07 5:33:45 PM  

I dont want to be on this planet anymore: FTA:  For this process to work, "the pulsing must be done at a rate that is neither too fast nor too slow," she said.


I like to pulse slow at first, but find that the pulsing tends to speed up uncontrollably towards the end.


0.8 seconds.
 
2020-08-07 5:51:38 PM  

Linux_Yes: I dont want to be on this planet anymore: FTA:  For this process to work, "the pulsing must be done at a rate that is neither too fast nor too slow," she said.


I like to pulse slow at first, but find that the pulsing tends to speed up uncontrollably towards the end.

0.8 seconds.

 
2020-08-07 8:07:50 PM  

I dont want to be on this planet anymore: Linux_Yes: I dont want to be on this planet anymore: FTA:  For this process to work, "the pulsing must be done at a rate that is neither too fast nor too slow," she said.


I like to pulse slow at first, but find that the pulsing tends to speed up uncontrollably towards the end.

0.8 seconds.


Yeah, that's kinda fast, but the hands don't mind.
 
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