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(Smithsonian Magazine)   August 6th is the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima. Here's six eyewitness accounts from that day. Never again   (smithsonianmag.com) divider line
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189 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 06 Aug 2020 at 2:29 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-08-05 10:33:59 PM  
well, actually nine but hey, who's counting.
 
2020-08-05 10:40:31 PM  
My Dad's birthday was D-Day, my Mom's was Pearl Harbor, and mine is Hiroshima.

War, what is it good for?
 
2020-08-05 10:52:47 PM  
I'm not the fence on this one.
The Japanese Government at the time where horrid people. One of my family's personal friend was "Dr. Sledge" who did the book Tom Hanks based the documentary "War in the Pacific"  and was a POW in the pacific.
Yup the Atomic Bomb...it was horrific, vicious, and terrible technology.
However the Japanese started it with a cowardly account that bombed hospitals, schools. Ships and barreks .
And their treatment of China and Korea in the war...NEEDED TO STOP.

And their prison camps...were not a walk in the park in the pacific either. Yup, they needed to 'take a beating' and if that meant using Atomics. So Be it.
 
2020-08-05 10:57:10 PM  

optikeye: and was a POW in the pacific.


My Mistake.. Dr. Sledge wasn't a POW. But a 'helper' for those there where POW's in the pacific.
 
2020-08-05 10:57:32 PM  

Badmoodman: My Dad's birthday was D-Day, my Mom's was Pearl Harbor, and mine is Hiroshima.

War, what is it good for?


My grandparents got married December 6, 1941. Their first morning as a married couple was a day that would live in infamy.
 
2020-08-05 11:13:24 PM  

scottydoesntknow: Badmoodman: My Dad's birthday was D-Day, my Mom's was Pearl Harbor, and mine is Hiroshima.

War, what is it good for?

My grandparents got married December 6, 1941. Their first morning as a married couple was a day that would live in infamy.


They had lots of sex afterwards.
 
2020-08-05 11:27:01 PM  
It was 8:15am Aug 6 in Japan.
We call the anniversary Aug 5 here in 'Murica.
 
2020-08-06 12:18:17 AM  
August 6th is the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima. Here's six eyewitness accounts from that day. Never again

Uhh...it already did happen again, three days later.
 
2020-08-06 4:15:29 AM  
Subby, you really dont understand how fanatical and zealous the Japanese were at the time do you? They would kill themselves before surrender on practically every island they lost. Okinawa saw 1/3 of the US force take casualties, while 100k japanese military and 150k civilians died

That was a single island battle. The war department estimated that there would have been 10 MILLION japanese casualties in an actual invasion of the home islands, and AT LEAST 1.7 million american casualties.


How the hell do you justify those numbers while saying the bomb was a naughty and unethical choice?
 
2020-08-06 4:50:21 AM  
My father in law is a survivor (hibakusha), he was only a few kilometers from ground zero as a three year old boy. Thankfully, his house was in a depression behind a hill and was fairly well shielded from the blast, his father was only a kilometer away and was severely burned.
He is now also a cancer survivor, as is his oldest daughter (my sister in law) and he feels that he's likely  responsible for her cancer due to his radiation exposure.
I'm surprised his story isn't included as until recently he was pretty vocal in both the kibakusha and anti-nuclear weapons communities, attending events and whatnot.
He's on the left here, in the hat, (in Israel). He's quoted in the description: Iwao Nagayama.
https://youtu.be/4mmxObwfmnI
 
2020-08-06 5:28:13 AM  
My birthday is today as well. I've always told ppl I was born on hiroshima day. Had a co-worker that got married 9/11/2000
 
2020-08-06 6:42:23 AM  
Never again.

I wish. That particular genie is out of the bottle, and all the stop-gap measures put in place since Oppenheimer's quote haven't removed the possibility of a repeat- those measures have only served to reduce the pool of potential weapon-makers to state actors or equally powerful private entities. Any group with sufficient funds and determination has the capability of building (or buying) a functional nuclear weapon. Sooner or later, someone believing they have nothing to lose will use one. MAD is only a viable defense if everyone is more-or-less rational.

The whole world knows it is possible to build nuclear weapons, and the design is not so complicated as to prevent someone from making the attempt. Even if every nuke on the planet disappeared this instant, more would be quickly assembled and made ready to deploy. Any organization willing to sacrifice the techs and engineers could manage it in a surprisingly short time.

The only real defenses against irrational people developing/deploying nuclear weapons are aggressive intelligence-gathering/analysis and concurrent diplomacy to limit the availability of critical components. Those only work if everyone involved agrees on:
- the nature of the threat,
- the appropriate countermeasures, and
- what to do about it once the inevitable happens.

North Korea developed nuclear weapons in part because some supposed 'adults' minding the playground were more interested in short-term geopolitical benefit than the immediate and long-term added risk. Iran is resuming its weapons program because some idiots outside Iran are willing to accept the possibility of thermonuclear war in order to gain short-term political benefit at home. Pakistan, India, North Korea, and Israel are all proof 'never again' is nothing more than a vain hope.

Humans aren't rational enough to be trusted with nuclear weapons. Risk/benefit calculations are always dependent upon those performing the calculation having a rational basis for assigning values to the variables. Far too many political leaders are incapable of such rational analysis, partly because ego is one of the prime motivators for every leader. Remaining in power is far more valuable to most leaders than the lives of their followers. Adding nuclear weapons to the available options for staying in power practically guarantees those weapons will inevitably be used again.

tl/dr: Never again is a worthwhile goal to strive for, but is almost certainly a vain struggle. Because humans suck at risk analysis.
 
2020-08-06 7:31:25 AM  

Badmoodman: My Dad's birthday was D-Day, my Mom's was Pearl Harbor, and mine is Hiroshima.

War, what is it good for?


Was it weird going to high school with your parents?
 
2020-08-06 8:18:49 AM  

Badmoodman: My Dad's birthday was D-Day, my Mom's was Pearl Harbor, and mine is Hiroshima.

War, what is it good for?


In your family's case, it would appear it's good for presents and cake.
 
2020-08-06 8:54:12 AM  

optikeye: I'm not the fence on this one.
The Japanese Government at the time where horrid people. One of my family's personal friend was "Dr. Sledge" who did the book Tom Hanks based the documentary "War in the Pacific"  and was a POW in the pacific.
Yup the Atomic Bomb...it was horrific, vicious, and terrible technology.
However the Japanese started it with a cowardly account that bombed hospitals, schools. Ships and barreks .
And their treatment of China and Korea in the war...NEEDED TO STOP.

And their prison camps...were not a walk in the park in the pacific either. Yup, they needed to 'take a beating' and if that meant using Atomics. So Be it.


You are a failed human.
 
2020-08-06 10:07:08 AM  

scottydoesntknow: Badmoodman: My Dad's birthday was D-Day, my Mom's was Pearl Harbor, and mine is Hiroshima.

War, what is it good for?

My grandparents got married December 6, 1941. Their first morning as a married couple was a day that would live in infamy.


Supposedly, my parents' first date was that night. Dad would be called up from the reserves two months later.
 
2020-08-06 10:21:03 AM  

Wenchmaster: Never again.

I wish. That particular genie is out of the bottle, and all the stop-gap measures put in place since Oppenheimer's quote haven't removed the possibility of a repeat- those measures have only served to reduce the pool of potential weapon-makers to state actors or equally powerful private entities. Any group with sufficient funds and determination has the capability of building (or buying) a functional nuclear weapon. Sooner or later, someone believing they have nothing to lose will use one. MAD is only a viable defense if everyone is more-or-less rational.

The whole world knows it is possible to build nuclear weapons, and the design is not so complicated as to prevent someone from making the attempt. Even if every nuke on the planet disappeared this instant, more would be quickly assembled and made ready to deploy. Any organization willing to sacrifice the techs and engineers could manage it in a surprisingly short time.

The only real defenses against irrational people developing/deploying nuclear weapons are aggressive intelligence-gathering/analysis and concurrent diplomacy to limit the availability of critical components. Those only work if everyone involved agrees on:
- the nature of the threat,
- the appropriate countermeasures, and
- what to do about it once the inevitable happens.

North Korea developed nuclear weapons in part because some supposed 'adults' minding the playground were more interested in short-term geopolitical benefit than the immediate and long-term added risk. Iran is resuming its weapons program because some idiots outside Iran are willing to accept the possibility of thermonuclear war in order to gain short-term political benefit at home. Pakistan, India, North Korea, and Israel are all proof 'never again' is nothing more than a vain hope.

Humans aren't rational enough to be trusted with nuclear weapons. Risk/benefit calculations are always dependent upon those performing the calculation having a rational basis for assigni ...


Fire and Brimstone...

Revelations was right on one aspect.
 
2020-08-06 11:57:43 AM  
Well war sucks.  Lots of people die.  Conventional bombing is no different other than intensity.  On the evening of February 13, 1945, a series of Allied firebombing raids against the German city of Dresden, reduced the "Florence of the Elbe" to rubble and flames, and killed roughly 25,000 people.

People seem to forget how brutal the Japanese were.  Even though they signed on, they could not have cared less about the Geneva Convention. Nearly half of all American POWs were forced to work as slave laborers. About 40 percent of American POWs died in Japanese captivity (by contrast only 1 percent died in Nazi camps).

The relatively high toll in Japanese camps is partly due to brutal mistreatment and summary execution. Many of the Japanese captors were cruel towards the POWs because they were viewed as contemptible for the very act of surrendering.

An invasion of Japan would have been staggering in terms of human deaths. Estimates range from 250,000 to 4 million Americans and 10 to 20 million Japanese casualties.  The bombings ended this horrific war.
 
2020-08-06 7:46:30 PM  

NeedlesslyCanadian: August 6th is the 75th anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima. Here's six eyewitness accounts from that day. Never again

Uhh...it already did happen again, three days later.

I have yet to hear a Christian nationalist explain that one rationally. Nagasaki wasn't just any city. It was the only majority Christian city in all of Japan. It was a tiny fishing village at the southern tip of the main island when Dutch trading vessels sailed up to it, along with Christian missionaries. They built it up into a thriving seaport.

Later, when the Tokugawa Shōgunate deposed the Emperor and implemented an insular policy of rejecting all Western influence, Christianity was heavily persecuted. The Christians who had migrated out from Nagasaki or converts that had been made elsewhere soon fled back to Nagasaki, out of easy reach of the Shō's armies.

Fast-forward through the Meiji Restoration and on to Imperial Japan and WWII, to Tojo, Pearl Harbor, Midway, and so on, and finally mid-August of 1945. The Bockscar bomber was dispatched to drop the bomb on a city in southern Japan known as Kokura, which, like pretty much every city in Japan that wasn't Nagasaki, was predominantly eastern religions such as Shintō and Buddhism.

But clouds hid Kokura from the Bockscar's bombsights, preventing accurate targeting, so they flew on south to the next sizable city they could find, which was Nagasaki. Clear skies. Wide open. The oh-so-"Christian" USA, established by God as a Shining City on the Hill, the Exemplar of what a Christian Nation should be, pretty much wiped out Christianity, that had taken centuries to get where it was, in a matter of minutes.

And why, pray tell, did clouds protect the pagan city of Kokura and not the Christian city of Nagasaki, leaving it wide open and utterly unprotected, in full view of the bombsites? Is the Christian God not real, but the Shintō ones are? Or do they both exist but the Shintō ones had the home field advantage over YHWH who'd apparently not be the God of the Whole Earth as His Word claims?
 
2020-08-06 10:15:12 PM  
Also my parents 75th wedding anniversary.
They went to Paris for their honeymoon. Paris, Texas where my dad was stationed.
 
2020-08-06 11:47:32 PM  
They forgot one: 
Family Guy
Youtube 1JEY24tPHOk
 
2020-08-07 4:39:21 AM  

jmsvrsn: Also my parents 75th wedding anniversary.
They went to Paris for their honeymoon. Paris, Texas where my dad was stationed.


Your parents had their 75th anniversary in 1945? You sound old.
 
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