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(SFGate)   Silicon Valley investor sparks privilege backlash after advertising for 'best teacher in Bay Area' to create micro-school of seven kids in his backyard and promising a salary that will 'beat whatever they are getting paid'   (sfgate.com) divider line
    More: Murica, Silicon Valley, High school, San Francisco Bay Area, Education, School, Twitter, San Jose, California, School districts  
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2580 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Aug 2020 at 5:30 AM (11 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-08-06 8:44:35 AM  
smbc-comics.comView Full Size
 
2020-08-06 8:46:33 AM  

LowbrowDeluxe: Holy shiat it smells libertarian in here.

/nachos and ballsack, if you're wondering


I resemble that!

No really though, I'm pretty far from libertarian and complaining about this is asinine. It's a problem in need of a right-now solution and this is how it's being done.
 
2020-08-06 8:47:44 AM  
I fail to see the outrage.  The learning pod concept is one of the only real options at this point today, and there's a cost associated with them.

Wanting a good education for your children is kind of a basic thing in parenting.  Right up there with feeding them, and ensuring they have a safe environment.
 
2020-08-06 8:57:03 AM  

sleze: Harry_Seldon: ds regardless of race, creed, color, or socio-economic status should be be removed from regular public schools and put in charter schools designed to train them to run America with extra money given to the parents (based on means testing) to support their entire family at a comfortable family income.

I started to agree with you and then you lost me.  I have also discussed doing this with Mrs. SLEZE but we certainly can't afford it.  Good for him if he can.  People send their kids to private school.  People have private tutors (hell, I took SAT prep classes like a lot of kids do).  This is no different.

That being said, a good public school will prepare kids as well as any prep school.


I'm happy to live in an area with good public schools. 15 miles right up the road is a public skool system where virtually no students in the thirteen high schools it operates have learned basic math or English grammar. They have the test scores to prove it. Most of those kids are screwed for life.
 
2020-08-06 9:03:50 AM  

LowbrowDeluxe: Holy shiat it smells libertarian in here.

/nachos and ballsack, if you're wondering


Its amazing that when government and society at large farks up some people find that unacceptable and look for their own solutions. While no man is an island, it helps to be able and willing to swim when necessary.
 
2020-08-06 9:04:45 AM  

TheDirtyNacho: LowbrowDeluxe: Holy shiat it smells libertarian in here.

/nachos and ballsack, if you're wondering

I resemble that!

No really though, I'm pretty far from libertarian and complaining about this is asinine. It's a problem in need of a right-now solution and this is how it's being done.


Less about the incident from the article (although attempting to hire away actual school teachers instead of just looking for tutors/home instructors was kind of a biatch move in terms of how he phrased it) and more about the giant screeds against public education in general in the thread.  If it doesn't apply to you then it doesn't.
 
2020-08-06 9:07:08 AM  
I guess "education should be accessible for everyone regardless of class" is a big controversial stance in here.
 
2020-08-06 9:08:42 AM  
What's the big deal?  It's his money, and if he can find someone willing to tutor for a great salary, then it seems like everyone is winning here.
 
2020-08-06 9:16:36 AM  

ByOwlLight: tuxq: If this were not a pandemic, I'd probably feel the same way the author wants me to feel. What he's doing is socially responsible for both the teacher and children. Small class, outdoors, and good pay for the teacher?

There used to be a time where we didn't use groupthink to convince ourselves that envy is someone else's fault. Take your ass to jelly school because if I had school-age kids right now and could afford to hire a private teacher, you bet your ass I would.

Or he could put his money into ensuring that all kids get the same or similar opportunities as his own kids. The erosion of greater societal responsibility, civics, and concepts of brotherhood in this country has done a ridiculous amount of damage. People regressing harder and harder to this state ("me and mine" mentalities, even for good and understandable reasons like wanting the best for your kids) moves us further and further away from the idea that all people are created equal.


Lol.

Make your own money, make your own choices.
 
2020-08-06 9:17:50 AM  

Hell Poodle: I guess "education should be accessible for everyone regardless of class" is a big controversial stance in here.


I don't think anyone is arguing about that. It's more like there is no safe way to reopen schools so some people are coming up with their own solution. Then some other Twitter chucklefark complains about it.
 
2020-08-06 9:21:15 AM  

kukukupo: Zeb Hesselgresser: duncan_bayne:

My observations from half a lifetime ago...

1. Teachers Unions opposed to any form of performance based pay for teachers.

2. Government imposed curricula at least a decade behind current research.

3. Schools unable to expel pupils pretty much regardless of how disruptive or toxic they were.

4. Education tailored to the middle of the bell curve with no support for the struggling or the bright.


My only comment would be that it is unfair to have #1 without #3 and #4.  If I can't remove a kid who is disrupting the others - it will always leave the class lagging in general.  Also - who wants the group of kids that have to be removed from the classroom if they are getting paid poorly for it? (Hardest job - least pay)


Counter point:  why should a teacher get paid more because a kid is smart and comes from a good family?

Oh wait!

Maybe pay based on the PROGRESS made.
 
2020-08-06 9:26:27 AM  
Elite schooling has never been about intelligence or technical knowledge or deep-dive learning into any subject.  It's always and only about networking and developing the 'classy' veneer to be able to meld in socially.

Those 'elite' super-expensive schools like Eton and Le Rosey are not to learn extensively about history or art or literature or calculus.  They're to learn how to act socially in case you end up at a cocktail party on the yacht of a Duke.

Sure, there's a base-level of knowledge you're expected to know, but other than that you can be as dumb as any Trump, but if you've attended the 'right' schools, then you're 'in'.
 
2020-08-06 9:41:09 AM  
So we're supposed to be mad at a private citizen for doing what we want the government to do, i.e. pay the teacher a decent wage and provide a safe learning environment for the students? Is that the gist of it?

What a stupid farking thing to be upset about.
 
2020-08-06 9:44:32 AM  

Mister Peejay: Good.  Maybe if enough rich twats decided to snipe teachers for private tutors, the public schools will be forced to pay teachers more.

Hahahahaha that will never happen.  It will be like the businesses looking for someone with a Master's degree in computer science and 5 years experience with software that has been out for one year, willing to start at $8 an hour, and wondering why nobody is applying for the job.


Or in my case, professors w/ masters degrees in various computing stuff and some doctorates in education, technology education, etc. teaching for AS degrees for programming and networking and the starting pay for the teacher is ~50k plus bumps.  The same college will hire a great student who just graduated with the 2 year AS degree into a junior developer, junior sysadmin, or junior network admin position starting at $55k, plus any bumps for documented real experience, etc.

Granted the faculty can teach extra in the summer at adjunct pay rate (~ $2200/3 credit course) but that also means no summer term off.
 
2020-08-06 9:46:26 AM  
As someone who has several teachers in their family, I just wanted to address some of these points:
1.    Teachers Unions opposed to any form of performance-based pay for teachers.
Why may performance-based pay be a problem? It depends on what factors are being evaluated. Most unions are against using standardized tests instead evaluating the growth of an individual students. Say you have a teacher with 30 kids, 3 are from recent immigrant families and don't have the reading level to do well on the test, 3 kids come from traumatic backgrounds and are struggling with life in general (the district office decided to cut the school counselor from the budget), 2 kids are on the spectrum and have trouble with testing, 2 kids transferred from a different district last week. 1/3 of the class doesn't score highly on the test- the teacher may be really good but the scores won't indicate that.
Am not saying that teachers should not be evaluated, any schools already have annual evaluations. The methods pushed by legislators tend to be blunt and don't take many factors into account.
Additional reading
https://insights.som.yale.edu/insight​s​/does-performance-based-pay-improve-te​aching
https://www.epi.org/publication/books​-​teachers_performance_pay_and_accountab​ility/

2. Government imposed curricula at least a decade behind current research.
This is a seriously complicated issue. The states get to determine the standards, the Fed can limit funding and has tried to have basic standards. There is nothing stopping states from working to exceed those standards- but when you have test score tied to funding without consideration of the numerous challenges faced by teachers and students, well, what do you expect?

3. Schools unable to expel pupils pretty much regardless of how disruptive or toxic they were.
Yeah, that is a problem.

4. Education tailored to the middle of the bell curve with no support for the struggling or the bright.
There used to be programs for the struggling and those who wanted to take the curriculum further. When I was a kid (long, long ago) the parents complained this wasn't fair and the district dropped them. This is something you can push for at a district level.

Not even getting into the issue of self-segregation and how always sending rich kids to school with other rich kids is a great way to prevent them from seeing the reality everyone else lives in.
 
2020-08-06 9:53:47 AM  
I'm sure all that jealousy privilege shaming will make him change his ways.
 
2020-08-06 9:55:01 AM  
And there's so many homeless miniature giraffes he could buy with that money.
 
2020-08-06 10:23:30 AM  

i.r.id10t: Mister Peejay: Good.  Maybe if enough rich twats decided to snipe teachers for private tutors, the public schools will be forced to pay teachers more.

Hahahahaha that will never happen.  It will be like the businesses looking for someone with a Master's degree in computer science and 5 years experience with software that has been out for one year, willing to start at $8 an hour, and wondering why nobody is applying for the job.

Or in my case, professors w/ masters degrees in various computing stuff and some doctorates in education, technology education, etc. teaching for AS degrees for programming and networking and the starting pay for the teacher is ~50k plus bumps.  The same college will hire a great student who just graduated with the 2 year AS degree into a junior developer, junior sysadmin, or junior network admin position starting at $55k, plus any bumps for documented real experience, etc.

Granted the faculty can teach extra in the summer at adjunct pay rate (~ $2200/3 credit course) but that also means no summer term off.


Adjuncts are the field hands of academe. I did that for a few years at a University in Baltimore that you probably have heard of.  I enjoyed the interaction with the students and appreciated the laissez faire attitude of "my" administrator who apparently did not give a flying fark what or how I was actually teaching (because deans don't work after dark). I was told by the customer base that I was good at teaching which stroked the ego.The extra cash it generated was hardly worth the effort, and there were no actual benefits. When I got tired of it, it was easy to walk away from.
 
2020-08-06 10:34:30 AM  

Nick Nostril: I wouldn't last a week working for a rich douchebag. Hell, I've had two jobs in my life where I was working with country club types. Both jobs I quit after the first day.


Somehow I think tech nerds are a bit different than "country club types", even if both groups have the same amount of money.
 
2020-08-06 10:35:43 AM  

karl2025: [smbc-comics.com image 684x799]


The mom in that comic apparently thinks a full time student only takes 2 classes per year?  (And also that exotic pets have no upkeep costs.)
 
2020-08-06 10:41:57 AM  

Hell Poodle: I guess "education should be accessible for everyone regardless of class" is a big controversial stance in here.


Well, of course it should be.  But it's not illegal to have your children opt out of public schools and go to private ones (or be homeschooled).

The only actual legal issue here is whether or not having six of seven families pool their resources change the thing from "home school" to full on "private school", requiring meeting a whole bunch of legal requirements.

Also note that this issue, like many, is partly based on the conservative bias that our constitution gives to the Senate.  Public schools right now get most of their money from the state, not the Feds.  But due to the virus and the fact that lots of money generating things are closed or banned, state tax revenues are down significantly, while at the same time costs are up.  The Democrats in Congress have passed bills to bail out the states and therefore public schools, but McConnell won't even let such come up for a vote.
 
2020-08-06 10:48:35 AM  

thatboyoverthere: duncan_bayne: cirby: Financially, this could be a good move for some.

Suppose you get six kids from different families. You hire one really good teacher for $120,000 per year, or four part-timers for $30K each to cover different subjects. Each family kicks in $20,000 per year. You have them take classes in a spare room at your big house in the suburbs.

That's about the same tuition as the average California private school, and a bit less than double what public schools in California spend per pupil ($12,000 or so).

If you went with twelve students ($10,000 each), it's actually cheaper per student than the public schools.

So, how did you wind up with taxpayer funded education that is both more expensive and of poorer quality?

My observations from half a lifetime ago...

1. Teachers Unions opposed to any form of performance based pay for teachers.

2. Government imposed curricula at least a decade behind current research.

3. Schools unable to expel pupils pretty much regardless of how disruptive or toxic they were.

4. Education tailored to the middle of the bell curve with no support for the struggling or the bright.

Okay. How do you objectively measure performance without giving the teacher incentive to just rig the results?

How long does the government need to wait to see if the research actually pans out before they implement it?

Should the education get rid of it's mandate that every child gets an education?

And if they don't aim to educate as many children as possible on the curve, how many kids should they educate?


The old president of Nebraska teachers union had the displeasure of having me in 11th grade. The woman would copy the book onto transparency, project onto the screen, read it verbatim and then 30% of your grade was taking notes which she would review. That's all I ever  need to know about sending my kids to public schools.
 
2020-08-06 11:16:30 AM  

astelmaszek: thatboyoverthere: duncan_bayne: cirby: Financially, this could be a good move for some.

Suppose you get six kids from different families. You hire one really good teacher for $120,000 per year, or four part-timers for $30K each to cover different subjects. Each family kicks in $20,000 per year. You have them take classes in a spare room at your big house in the suburbs.

That's about the same tuition as the average California private school, and a bit less than double what public schools in California spend per pupil ($12,000 or so).

If you went with twelve students ($10,000 each), it's actually cheaper per student than the public schools.

So, how did you wind up with taxpayer funded education that is both more expensive and of poorer quality?

My observations from half a lifetime ago...

1. Teachers Unions opposed to any form of performance based pay for teachers.

2. Government imposed curricula at least a decade behind current research.

3. Schools unable to expel pupils pretty much regardless of how disruptive or toxic they were.

4. Education tailored to the middle of the bell curve with no support for the struggling or the bright.

Okay. How do you objectively measure performance without giving the teacher incentive to just rig the results?

How long does the government need to wait to see if the research actually pans out before they implement it?

Should the education get rid of it's mandate that every child gets an education?

And if they don't aim to educate as many children as possible on the curve, how many kids should they educate?

The old president of Nebraska teachers union had the displeasure of having me in 11th grade. The woman would copy the book onto transparency, project onto the screen, read it verbatim and then 30% of your grade was taking notes which she would review. That's all I ever  need to know about sending my kids to public schools.


So because you lived in a state run by Republicans, that means all public schools are bad? And none of this addresses my questions. Just you using your bad experience to say it much be the same everywhere.
 
2020-08-06 11:28:50 AM  

BMFPitt: karl2025: [smbc-comics.com image 684x799]

The mom in that comic apparently thinks a full time student only takes 2 classes per year?  (And also that exotic pets have no upkeep costs.)


Two semesters per normal year, more if they attend summer school.

$34,000 per year.

$10,000 or so for the cats leaves $24,000.

Four courses per semester (a lot of colleges have four as a maximum for most students).

That's eight courses per year x $3000 = $24,000.
 
2020-08-06 11:37:01 AM  

ByOwlLight: tuxq: If this were not a pandemic, I'd probably feel the same way the author wants me to feel. What he's doing is socially responsible for both the teacher and children. Small class, outdoors, and good pay for the teacher?

There used to be a time where we didn't use groupthink to convince ourselves that envy is someone else's fault. Take your ass to jelly school because if I had school-age kids right now and could afford to hire a private teacher, you bet your ass I would.

Or he could put his money into ensuring that all kids get the same or similar opportunities as his own kids. The erosion of greater societal responsibility, civics, and concepts of brotherhood in this country has done a ridiculous amount of damage. People regressing harder and harder to this state ("me and mine" mentalities, even for good and understandable reasons like wanting the best for your kids) moves us further and further away from the idea that all people are created equal.


You pine for some fantasyland, because the world has never been like that, anywhere.

But for the lulz, I'll ask what you are actively doing out in the world to make sure everyone has the same opportunities you do?
 
2020-08-06 11:57:59 AM  
th.bing.comView Full Size

And if she looks like this.
 
2020-08-06 12:04:00 PM  
I wish someone would offer something like that around here in Austin TX.  I think Mrs. BraFish would jump at that in a second.  Anyone need an excellent and trained multi-age K-2 teacher around here?
 
2020-08-06 12:14:47 PM  
Hey dumb fooks:

capitalism = system of privilege is for sale

If there is no capped top end to what you can buy and privatize, then there isn't and as it is we the people it means  that's what we wanted.
We want privilege. Humans the world over desire personal privileges.

The bell curve rules and that's what we are.

So stop acting like that's not true, and that when you dam someone for theirs your a hypocrite f you take the privilege of eating a meal is any of your fellow citizens go without today.
Or the privilege of sleeping in doors when your fellow citizens go without.
 
2020-08-06 12:26:16 PM  

PvtStash: Hey dumb fooks:

capitalism = system of privilege is for sale

If there is no capped top end to what you can buy and privatize, then there isn't and as it is we the people it means  that's what we wanted.
We want privilege. Humans the world over desire personal privileges.

The bell curve rules and that's what we are.

So stop acting like that's not true, and that when you dam someone for theirs your a hypocrite f you take the privilege of eating a meal is any of your fellow citizens go without today.
Or the privilege of sleeping in doors when your fellow citizens go without.


pyxis.nymag.comView Full Size


Can't be accused of slippery slope fallacy if you just jump the fark off a cliffside of stupid.
 
2020-08-06 12:51:57 PM  

BraFish: I wish someone would offer something like that around here in Austin TX.  I think Mrs. BraFish would jump at that in a second.  Anyone need an excellent and trained multi-age K-2 teacher around here?


i am a teacher and have a teacher friend in CA trying to find a pod.

I was wondering if these things were myths seeing how I have yet to see an article of people stating they are doing this.

it sounds nice, but I will stick with $100 hour math tutoring via zoom for now.  even if I live in BFE, I can still tutor kids from richer places online.  Can't do that locally.
 
2020-08-06 12:59:21 PM  
BIDDING WAR - what about that family in Aspen that needed life-coarch, hockey instructor....
 
2020-08-06 1:02:52 PM  

Chief Superintendent Lookout: [images.fineartamerica.com image 850x646]

So, basically a one-room school house, which was typical in the US through the early 20th Century.  This was actually socialisms because the people of the town would collective gather money and materials to build a school and hire a teacher or two.  That's how the US went down the toilet, because the socialisms got us early.

Lock him up!!!


Socialism? I thought that was an autonomous collective.
 
2020-08-06 1:11:33 PM  

Maturin: Here's an idea. How 'bout we pay teachers what they're worth?


Would the bad ones accept a pay cut?
 
2020-08-06 1:12:53 PM  
I feel like the addition of $2000 UBEREATS gift cards just completes this whole thing.
Not only offering a bounty but a bounty in a fiat currency of a company that dehumanizes people, but also exploits them.
While trying to hire someone as a way to separate him and his family from the impacts of COVID.

Like if that isn't a double BINGO I don't know what is.
 
2020-08-06 1:50:23 PM  

Chief Superintendent Lookout: So, basically a one-room school house, which was typical in the US through the early 20th Century. This was actually socialisms because the people of the town would collective gather money and materials to build a school and hire a teacher or two.


Actually the opposite of socialism, because the most common way to build and fund these schools was to ask for voluntary donations, or charge the parents, instead of taxing everyone in town.

Back then, you only got tax-funded schools in the bigger towns, not the ones with one room schoolhouses.
 
2020-08-06 2:16:21 PM  

PenguinTheRed: That's a very good idea.  Ordinary parents could get on board with this too, pool money and hire teachers for their kids.  Or maybe even start whole schools.  Heck, maybe the government could pitch in and use tax dollars to open "public" schools that anyone could enroll in. And by making the schools public we can take agency completely out of the parents' hands and the government could decide how and what to teach kids!


[rant about treating people with respect political correctness flushed]

Sounds like a terrible idea, doesn't it? Until you consider that a large percentage of the population is dumber than a sack of hammers and proud of it. "Diggin' coal was good enough for mah pappy, it is good enough for me and it is good enough for mah son! An' don' git me started 'bout edumakatin' mah daughters!"
 
2020-08-06 2:26:51 PM  
What else are rich people not allowed to have because you can't afford it.?
 
jvl [BareFark]
2020-08-06 2:34:31 PM  
So a good teacher is supposed to quit their well-paid good-benefits job and teach your rug rats for a tiny bit more money and then get fired after one year.

Good luck with that dooshbro
 
2020-08-06 2:36:25 PM  
If this pandemic taught us anything, besides the rock-bottom stupidity of half our nation, is that without teachers being used to manage child storage, our economy goes nowhere.  Maybe start paying teachers a decent wage since everyone else's income depends on it?

My wife works as hard, if not harder, doing a job that most people wouldn't/couldn't do and makes 1/3rd as much.  And in Texas, she is not allowed to strike or they could take her license and pension away.
 
2020-08-06 2:40:55 PM  
There would be absolutely nothing wrong with this.

IF, and ONLY IF, there were laws around this kind of educational activity which forced the private provider to give half the places in these micro-schools to academically bright students from schools in poor areas.

THEN all would be well.

As he is doing this now though it is a huge expression of rich people's sense of privilege.
 
2020-08-06 4:44:48 PM  

gar1013: Counter point:  why should a teacher get paid more because a kid is smart and comes from a good family?


Because those are the people who change things, for better or worse.
 
2020-08-06 5:07:02 PM  
Should we remove a perfectly good teacher from the local public school system to be a private tutor? "Whatever they're paying you I'll beat it" is what gets me. Try hiring someone who's looking for work instead.
 
2020-08-06 5:25:05 PM  

jvl: So a good teacher is supposed to quit their well-paid good-benefits job and teach your rug rats for a tiny bit more money and then get fired after one year.

Good luck with that dooshbro


I see you are not aware with what teachers make?

if five parents who are willing to pay a private school $40k in tuition, then $30k to a private pod teacher is a deal.

5 x $25k = $125,000  (some goes to the service that matches everything up)

which is quite more than a teacher makes...with probably a lot less work and stress.
 
2020-08-06 8:13:11 PM  

cirby: Financially, this could be a good move for some.

Suppose you get six kids from different families. You hire one really good teacher for $120,000 per year, or four part-timers for $30K each to cover different subjects. Each family kicks in $20,000 per year. You have them take classes in a spare room at your big house in the suburbs.

That's about the same tuition as the average California private school, and a bit less than double what public schools in California spend per pupil ($12,000 or so).

If you went with twelve students ($10,000 each), it's actually cheaper per student than the public schools.


As someone who has done maintenance in schools and observed many other things about them, I can assure you that there are many more costs incorporated in that $12K/pupil for California schools than just the teacher's salary.
 
2020-08-06 8:23:54 PM  
duncan_bayne:

. . . So, how did you wind up with taxpayer funded education that is both more expensive and of poorer quality?

My observations from half a lifetime ago...

1. Teachers Unions opposed to any form of performance based pay for teachers. There are good reasons for this:  the teachability of students can vary enormously from school to school and somewhat from class to class within a school.  It isn't fair to penalize the teachers who get the students that are tougher to teach.

2. Government imposed curricula at least a decade behind current research.   Sometimes this is true but not always.

3. Schools unable to expel pupils pretty much regardless of how disruptive or toxic they were.  Extend this one to discipline of many sorts, not just expelling.  Smaller class sizes do tend to make these situations more manageable.

4. Education tailored to the middle of the bell curve with no support for the struggling or the bright.  This is also a problem related to funding.  It is interesting to note that there are fewer "struggling students" proportionately admitted to private schools.  They often manage to dodge the expense of dealing with these kids which means that society at large has to deal with them in either public schools or in lockups (more expensive and less correctional).
 
2020-08-06 10:45:52 PM  

jvl: So a good teacher is supposed to quit their well-paid good-benefits job and teach your rug rats for a tiny bit more money and then get fired after one year.

Good luck with that dooshbro


Well their current job may kill them within the year.  So there's that.
 
2020-08-06 10:52:04 PM  

The Captain's Ghost: There are good reasons for this:  the teachability of students can vary enormously from school to school and somewhat from class to class within a school.  It isn't fair to penalize the teachers who get the students that are tougher to teach.


Only if you assume that every student is completely unknown to start the year.  Because if they all have a history, that can be factored in and you can evaluate value added.
 
jvl [BareFark]
2020-08-07 12:18:36 AM  

BMFPitt: jWell their current job may kill them within the year.  So there's that.


All schools in the area are work-from-home, so no there isn't that.
 
2020-08-07 3:19:32 AM  

BMFPitt: The Captain's Ghost: There are good reasons for this:  the teachability of students can vary enormously from school to school and somewhat from class to class within a school.  It isn't fair to penalize the teachers who get the students that are tougher to teach.

Only if you assume that every student is completely unknown to start the year.  Because if they all have a history, that can be factored in and you can evaluate value added.


There are other factors in "teachability" besides base knowledge which could be known from past history.  It would be very difficult to account for environmental, social or mental health factors even if known and those factors could also be changing with time.
 
2020-08-07 7:53:06 AM  

The Captain's Ghost: There are other factors in "teachability" besides base knowledge which could be known from past history.  It would be very difficult to account for environmental, social or mental health factors even if known and those factors could also be changing with time.


Yes, I'm well aquatinted with the, "Every child in the class could be going through a divorce in the same year" argument.  To that my response is the law of large numbers.  Just because noise exists doesn't mean we shouldn't try to measure the signal.
 
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