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(YouTube)   With passenger travel virtually nonexistent now, this company is turning surplus A380s into the largest plane capable of hauling cargo loads of rubber dog shiat out of Hong Kong   (youtube.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy  
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401 clicks; posted to Geek » on 05 Aug 2020 at 6:06 AM (6 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-08-04 11:45:31 PM  
Hmmm.

From the video description: "additional storage space for light consignments."

How light, you ask?

CNN says "close to 60 tons" of cargo, "even more weight than the Beluga XL, Airbus's gigantic, whale-resembling freighter airplane, can transport."

CNN fails to realize the Beluga XL (which can carry 55 tons) is based on a 2-engine Airbus 330, which is much smaller than the 4-engine A380.

real 4-engine cargo jumbo jet, the Boeing 747-8f, can carry over 132 tons of cargo.

Airbus offered a freighter version of the A380, which would have handled 150 tons... but prioritized production of the passenger version, so everyone bought 747s.
 
TWX [TotalFark]
2020-08-05 12:04:34 AM  

dbirchall: Hmmm.

From the video description: "additional storage space for light consignments."

How light, you ask?

CNN says "close to 60 tons" of cargo, "even more weight than the Beluga XL, Airbus's gigantic, whale-resembling freighter airplane, can transport."

CNN fails to realize the Beluga XL (which can carry 55 tons) is based on a 2-engine Airbus 330, which is much smaller than the 4-engine A380.

A real 4-engine cargo jumbo jet, the Boeing 747-8f, can carry over 132 tons of cargo.

Airbus offered a freighter version of the A380, which would have handled 150 tons... but prioritized production of the passenger version, so everyone bought 747s.


In the video starting around 2:06 they describe the conversion and the floor markings on the passenger decks.  It sounds like they're doing literally nothing to change the internal structure of the airframe for cargo, they're literally just pulling out the cheap-seats and using the seat mounting tracks as tiedown points, and using those marks to ensure that individual sections of deck aren't overloaded.

I bet they're stuck with the aircraft and they're trying anything to recoup costs.  Makes me wonder if it costs more to operate it at a loss or to park it.

747s have been converted from passenger to cargo variants in the past, but it helps that there's factory support.  It's documented what needs to be changed over in order to make that transition, and it wouldn't surprise me if even passenger versions have been ordered with whatever trappings are needed in order to turn them into cargo aircraft.  If the A380's cargo program never really went anywhere then it may simply be too expensive to do a proper job of it.
 
2020-08-05 12:10:35 AM  

TWX: dbirchall: Hmmm.

From the video description: "additional storage space for light consignments."

How light, you ask?

CNN says "close to 60 tons" of cargo, "even more weight than the Beluga XL, Airbus's gigantic, whale-resembling freighter airplane, can transport."

CNN fails to realize the Beluga XL (which can carry 55 tons) is based on a 2-engine Airbus 330, which is much smaller than the 4-engine A380.

A real 4-engine cargo jumbo jet, the Boeing 747-8f, can carry over 132 tons of cargo.

Airbus offered a freighter version of the A380, which would have handled 150 tons... but prioritized production of the passenger version, so everyone bought 747s.

In the video starting around 2:06 they describe the conversion and the floor markings on the passenger decks.  It sounds like they're doing literally nothing to change the internal structure of the airframe for cargo, they're literally just pulling out the cheap-seats and using the seat mounting tracks as tiedown points, and using those marks to ensure that individual sections of deck aren't overloaded.

I bet they're stuck with the aircraft and they're trying anything to recoup costs.  Makes me wonder if it costs more to operate it at a loss or to park it.

747s have been converted from passenger to cargo variants in the past, but it helps that there's factory support.  It's documented what needs to be changed over in order to make that transition, and it wouldn't surprise me if even passenger versions have been ordered with whatever trappings are needed in order to turn them into cargo aircraft.  If the A380's cargo program never really went anywhere then it may simply be too expensive to do a proper job of it.


Yeah.  Also, the 747 was kinda designed as a cargo plane from the outset, so even passenger versions may have some innate structural capabilities.  I've been on KLM's "combi" 747s -- passengers in the front, cargo in the back.
 
2020-08-05 12:26:36 AM  

dbirchall: passengers in the front, cargo in the back.


It's a planemullet!!
 
2020-08-05 6:41:59 AM  
It's still infinity$$$ to airfreight anything and good luck if you're some regular Joe who needs to ship something via ocean freight
 
2020-08-05 8:27:34 AM  

dbirchall: Yeah.  Also, the 747 was kinda designed as a cargo plane from the outset, so even passenger versions may have some innate structural capabilities.  I've been on KLM's "combi" 747s -- passengers in the front, cargo in the back.


The 747 had multiple ways to load cargo without using passenger doors. This is but one example:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-05 9:48:12 AM  
Can't wait for someone to forget to pull my amazon package out of the overhead bins they left in.
 
2020-08-05 10:42:08 AM  

dbirchall: CNN says "close to 60 tons" of cargo, "even more weight than the Beluga XL, Airbus's gigantic, whale-resembling freighter airplane, can transport."

CNN fails to realize the Beluga XL (which can carry 55 tons) is based on a 2-engine Airbus 330, which is much smaller than the 4-engine A380.


Both Beluga and Beluga XL were made to carry oversized cargo that is not particularly heavy or dense. They make poor comparisons to real cargo planes.
 
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