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(The Hill)   For some completely unknown reason, parents don't want their children to attend school in-person. *cough cough*   (thehill.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Donald Trump, Percentage point, full-time, 15-percent increase, Republican Party, favor of full-time remote classes, Oklahoma, K-12 parents  
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1309 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Aug 2020 at 11:20 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-08-03 10:47:29 AM  
I want my son to attend school in person.  He needs the social interaction, esp since that's where he's struggling right now.

I'm also not willing to put him, or anyone else, at risk.

I'm furious because this could have been fixed but it's been grossly mishandled at every single farking step.
 
2020-08-03 11:16:33 AM  
This is going to be used as a case study for decades as an example of how economic disparity self-perpetuates.

I am lucky enough to be able to keep my kids out of school if necessary. We have the tech, me and the Mrs can work from home, and the kids are pretty curious.

But there are so many that can't make it work and they're usually on more disadvantaged side of things. This is just going to fark them over worse.
 
2020-08-03 11:21:46 AM  
The percentage of parents who say they want full-time, in-person school for their children in the fall has fallen 20 points in recent months

So, a thing you may have noticed is Americans putting on a display of bravery up until the moment when they need to actually make a decision.  Their minds change very quickly.
 
2020-08-03 11:23:11 AM  
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2020-08-03 11:29:13 AM  
My nearly retired boomer neighbor is pissed school isn't going to be babysitting her granddaughter for her.
 
2020-08-03 11:30:52 AM  
As some school districts, mostly in red states or red areas of blue states, move towards full in person instruction, we shall soon have a mass of data about exactly how much, or how little, children get the virus, get sick, get seriously sick, die, and spread it to adults and other children.

I've argued in the past that all of the above should be fairly low numbers (especially deaths, especially those from children without previous medical conditions-all previous indications are that this number should be very close to zero (there have only been something like 228 deaths from under 18-year olds nationwide, out of the 160k Covid deaths overall)), but I dunno if "fairly low" will really be low enough to open safely.  I completely understand why parents are protective of their children, although the largest real world concern will be if they spread the disease to their teachers and older family members.
 
2020-08-03 11:30:56 AM  
My heart is breaking for my 13 year old and the isolation he's been dealing with. But my wife is routinely working 70 hours a week (ICU nurse), we've had 2 family members in SC die from COVID, and several childhood friends in NY/NJ/PA have lost parents. One of them was the most rabid, trumpity-trump-trump douchebag until he and his mother had to say goodbye to his father via Facetime with a nurse holding the phone-now he's equally vocal in his hate for all things trump.

This sucks. But it's a plague. And there's a reason that Pestilence was one of the Four Horseman, right up there with Famine, War, and Death.
 
2020-08-03 11:32:03 AM  
We still haven't gotten any guidance from my kid's school, and she's supposed to start in a few weeks. Their website still just has a statement from the beginning of June, saying "We haven't gotten any guidance from the county board of health, so here are the three options.", with no indication which option we should even be planning for. I'm tempted to just say fark it and keep her home. Maybe she can test into first grade in 2021.

Compare this to friends both local and across the country. They've gotten direct communications, surveys, zoom presentations...WTF?
 
2020-08-03 11:32:31 AM  
Well the GOP did ask you to sacrifice your lives for the economy, and you refused.
So the kids-in-cages party had to go to Plan B.
 
2020-08-03 11:33:40 AM  
I would have liked to have seen some type of plan to mitigate risks but have kids in school part time on a rotational basis, or have them divided into local learning pods or something based on geography.  But, no, no one paid attention or did what they were supposed to do to get the risk low enough.

Interestingly, where I live the preschools will open but there will be no regular school for the public schools until January.  Private schools are closed until 10/1 at which time they will revisit the possibility of partial opening.
 
2020-08-03 11:33:41 AM  

Rapmaster2000: The percentage of parents who say they want full-time, in-person school for their children in the fall has fallen 20 points in recent months

So, a thing you may have noticed is Americans putting on a display of bravery up until the moment when they need to actually make a decision.  Their minds change very quickly.


Yep, as soon as as there are a few outbreaks then close to 100% of the parents at the affected school will want remote learning only. And you just know there are going to be lawsuits from these same parent's who didn't care at first because they didn't do enough to keep little Timmy from catching it and bringing it home.
 
2020-08-03 11:33:51 AM  

Geotpf: As some school districts, mostly in red states or red areas of blue states, move towards full in person instruction, we shall soon have a mass of data about exactly how much, or how little, children get the virus, get sick, get seriously sick, die, and spread it to adults and other children.

I've argued in the past that all of the above should be fairly low numbers (especially deaths, especially those from children without previous medical conditions-all previous indications are that this number should be very close to zero (there have only been something like 228 deaths from under 18-year olds nationwide, out of the 160k Covid deaths overall)), but I dunno if "fairly low" will really be low enough to open safely.  I completely understand why parents are protective of their children, although the largest real world concern will be if they spread the disease to their teachers and older family members.


You must be a masochist. I can't think of any other reason you keep coming into these threads with this line of bullshiat.

Enjoy the flogging, I guess.
 
2020-08-03 11:36:04 AM  

TheYeti: I would have liked to have seen some type of plan to mitigate risks but have kids in school part time on a rotational basis, or have them divided into local learning pods or something based on geography.  But, no, no one paid attention or did what they were supposed to do to get the risk low enough.

Interestingly, where I live the preschools will open but there will be no regular school for the public schools until January.  Private schools are closed until 10/1 at which time they will revisit the possibility of partial opening.


Reopen just in time for flu season.

Sweet!
 
2020-08-03 11:36:17 AM  
Why is "infect my kid with a deadly disease and send them into my house" such a hard sell?
 
2020-08-03 11:36:42 AM  
The gross violation of trust being foisted on the American public, especially parents of small children by a national push by this administration is criminal.  There are solutions that are not a death sentence meted out by a sadistric Educaton Department and callous CDC.

The poor kids who need school delivered nutrition can be served by the same school busses that would deliver them to the festering pot of virus school house.    The bus would deliver.

The internet hot spot and equipment could be delivered by the same bus.  Teachers could be on the same bus circuit, for face to face teaching.  The bus would deliver.

Most teachers lesson plans are more complicated than the logistics of taking a school bus from the lot and placing it near the student.

The one house school had advantages that went away with age-level teaching, in case someone wants to point out that students centered around a parked school bus would have different classes.
 
2020-08-03 11:37:42 AM  
There are a number of either non-partisan (CDC, AAP) or outright left wing (AFT, NEA) organizations calling for in-person learning. So despite those blaming Trump, it's more complicated than just yes or no.  Some school's simply don't have the resources to support a hybrid model.  Some parents (esp lower income) don't have tablets/laptops for each (or any) child or don't have net access.  And there are plenty of parents calling for in-person learning.

That said, it needs to happen correctly.  Just recently here in Georgia, a YMCA summer camp had half their kids catch the plague because, guess what, the camp didn't make them wear masks (only the counselors).  On this morning's news they were covering my local school district's return to the classroom and guess what, the kids won't be required to wear masks, only the teachers.  For educators they sure seem dumb.
 
2020-08-03 11:37:56 AM  

Geotpf: As some school districts, mostly in red states or red areas of blue states, move towards full in person instruction, we shall soon have a mass of data about exactly how much, or how little, children get the virus, get sick, get seriously sick, die, and spread it to adults and other children. I've argued in the past that all of the above should be fairly low numbers (especially deaths, especially those from children without previous medical conditions-all previous indications are that this number should be very close to zero (there have only been something like 228 deaths from under 18-year olds nationwide, out of the 160k Covid deaths overall)), but I dunno if "fairly low" will really be low enough to open safely.  I completely understand why parents are protective of their children, although the largest real world concern will be if they spread the disease to their teachers and older family members.


You sound managerial. People aren't "numbers" for you to analyze on your spreadsheets.
 
2020-08-03 11:38:06 AM  
This makes me glad I never had kids. God help you people who do since the Plague Spreader and Chief is gunning for your kids to show up at a virus party instead of the usual babysitting that happens.
 
2020-08-03 11:40:14 AM  
Meh.  The studies we have show that grade school kids who are the most in need of socialization are the least effected demographic.  They are mildly effected and don't appear to be spreading it.

Once you hit puberty, the risks go up.
 
2020-08-03 11:40:23 AM  
Didn't RTFA but the district here finally decide maybe it is not a good idea to bring everyone back right now since case keep going up, OK.  Still leaning towards sending my kid to the online charter school this year.  I see way to much disruption in the local district when they decide to actually bring the kids back into the  schools.  And a lot of teachers are looking at quitting if they have to go back.
 
2020-08-03 11:42:09 AM  
I mean, W. didn't fark up the SARS epidemic...that's a low bar to clear

Trump couldn't even do that right.
 
2020-08-03 11:42:16 AM  

BullBearMS: Meh.  The studies we have show that grade school kids who are the most in need of socialization are the least effected demographic.  They are mildly effected and don't appear to be spreading it.

Once you hit puberty, the risks go up.


The teachers, teacher's aides, coaches, administration, lunch ladies, and janitors all thank you for your concern.
 
2020-08-03 11:43:19 AM  
It wasn't that long ago I honestly didn't know the difference between republican and democrat. I still don't fully 'get it', as it was just never very important to me. Even when it was explained in simple language I didn't quite grasp the concept. However, In the past 6 months I have witnessed many demonstrations of these differences. Though I may not understand what philosophical motivations each party may have, I have seen enough by each's actions and heard enough of each's arguments to know I absolutely am NOT a republican. I am learning to loathe them in ways I never thought possible.

The sad part is my whole family (and wife's family) is Republican. I've learned to bite my tongue, hoping for a better November.
 
2020-08-03 11:43:31 AM  

meat0918: BullBearMS: Meh.  The studies we have show that grade school kids who are the most in need of socialization are the least effected demographic.  They are mildly effected and don't appear to be spreading it.

Once you hit puberty, the risks go up.

The teachers, teacher's aides, coaches, administration, lunch ladies, and janitors all thank you for your concern.


And the people living in multi-generational housing situations also thank you.

Abuela will be missed, but she was a necessary sacrifice for Mammon.
 
2020-08-03 11:43:59 AM  

BullBearMS: Meh.  The studies we have show that grade school kids who are the most in need of socialization are the least effected demographic.  They are mildly effected and don't appear to be spreading it.

Once you hit puberty, the risks go up.


It's a good thing there are no people over the age of 10 in schools.
 
2020-08-03 11:44:42 AM  

BullBearMS: Meh.  The studies we have show that grade school kids who are the most in need of socialization are the least effected demographic.  They are mildly effected and don't appear to be spreading it.

Once you hit puberty, the risks go up.


Psst, Europe's education system if far different is so many ways than America's.
 
2020-08-03 11:45:07 AM  

LegacyDL: Geotpf: As some school districts, mostly in red states or red areas of blue states, move towards full in person instruction, we shall soon have a mass of data about exactly how much, or how little, children get the virus, get sick, get seriously sick, die, and spread it to adults and other children. I've argued in the past that all of the above should be fairly low numbers (especially deaths, especially those from children without previous medical conditions-all previous indications are that this number should be very close to zero (there have only been something like 228 deaths from under 18-year olds nationwide, out of the 160k Covid deaths overall)), but I dunno if "fairly low" will really be low enough to open safely.  I completely understand why parents are protective of their children, although the largest real world concern will be if they spread the disease to their teachers and older family members.

You sound managerial. People aren't "numbers" for you to analyze on your spreadsheets.


Just replace that with "we'll have data as to how many people can survive being burned at the stake" so we'll know in the future how to deal with accused witches.

The 20% that are maimed for life will be negligible since with a NOVEL disease we can know everything there is to know from the beginning if we have political will.

I love it when people volunteer other people's children to experiment with an alien life form.
 
2020-08-03 11:45:25 AM  

xtalman: Didn't RTFA but the district here finally decide maybe it is not a good idea to bring everyone back right now since case keep going up, OK.  Still leaning towards sending my kid to the online charter school this year.  I see way to much disruption in the local district when they decide to actually bring the kids back into the  schools.  And a lot of teachers are looking at quitting if they have to go back.


We switched into a much smaller private school that is leaps and bounds ahead of the publics in online learning, and we actually live in a pretty good school district....free chrome books in elementary schools, etc. I'd hate to see what the public schools in really poor areas are doing.
 
2020-08-03 11:47:11 AM  
Here's a kid at my kids' high school. Posted without comment.
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-03 11:48:16 AM  

Geotpf: As some school districts, mostly in red states or red areas of blue states, move towards full in person instruction, we shall soon have a mass of data about exactly how much, or how little, children get the virus, get sick, get seriously sick, die, and spread it to adults and other children.


This is assuming the data coming out of these states is not completely hosed/somehow missing. The mismanagement of data of this pandemic has done more damage than the disease itself and will impact the trust most people place in leadership for generations to come.
 
2020-08-03 11:50:31 AM  

RedPhoenix122: I want my son to attend school in person.  He needs the social interaction, esp since that's where he's struggling right now.

I'm also not willing to put him, or anyone else, at risk.

I'm furious because this could have been fixed but it's been grossly mishandled at every single farking step.


Know a lot of parents that would prefer in person instruction, but are not planning on it because they don't want the disease vector added. They don't put it that way, however preferring to just say:

"I'm not risking my kid being one of the few dying."
 
2020-08-03 11:51:32 AM  
My BIL is sending his kids back to school in a hotspot. My wife is so furious with him she will not talk to him.
 
2020-08-03 11:51:53 AM  
SIL just quit her job to teach my niece and nephew. They're kindergarten and 2nd grade, so they'll be fine (she's working on a socialization plan). Like others have said, I feel really bad for the 15 year old (my sister's). He's going into 10th grade and was going to be JV quarterback. Really sucks that he might not get that (fall sports are tentatively pushed back to February). And my 19 year old nephew missed spring semester first year of college (and baseball season), which *really* sucks because he's already a junior and scheduled to graduate winter 2021, so nearly a quarter of his undergrad time will be in online study.
 
2020-08-03 11:53:20 AM  

Geotpf: although the largest real world concern will be if they spread the disease to their teachers and older family members.


If?

It's not like they spread cold, flu, lice, pinkeye, and whatever else the filthy little window lickers pick up.
 
2020-08-03 12:00:14 PM  
Sat through the (virtual) School Board meeting for my districts reopening plan. They are doing a 3 option thing with in person school, a HIFLEX option (district teachers expected to teach in person students and virtual students simultaneously), and a virtual academy run by unknown entities.

Teachers are freaking out. Not only are they going to be in classrooms with disease vectors (i.e. students) that they are responsible to enforce masks and distancing on, but they are supposed to also be virtually teaching the remote students. This is with less than a month of training on running the e-learning, and with no idea how that implementation of that is going to look (this article actually included a link to another to how to do this, and I highly doubt the district will be able to accomplish a fraction of the technical setup, much less the training). The teacher comments on safety and attempting a new teaching method with no prep time were heartbreaking in the board meeting. Board of course ignored and proceeded with the plan (because it would be a shame to throw out the steering committee's hard work that was done without teacher input).

My child is staying home. Full stop. We're hoping the HIFLEX thing works out, but I feel bad for the teacher who has to try to do that. The district has released no information on the other virtual academy, other than to say it's taught by certified teachers asynchronously (and by a state approved but distinct curriculum).
 
2020-08-03 12:18:59 PM  

xalres: Geotpf: As some school districts, mostly in red states or red areas of blue states, move towards full in person instruction, we shall soon have a mass of data about exactly how much, or how little, children get the virus, get sick, get seriously sick, die, and spread it to adults and other children.

I've argued in the past that all of the above should be fairly low numbers (especially deaths, especially those from children without previous medical conditions-all previous indications are that this number should be very close to zero (there have only been something like 228 deaths from under 18-year olds nationwide, out of the 160k Covid deaths overall)), but I dunno if "fairly low" will really be low enough to open safely.  I completely understand why parents are protective of their children, although the largest real world concern will be if they spread the disease to their teachers and older family members.

You must be a masochist. I can't think of any other reason you keep coming into these threads with this line of bullshiat.

Enjoy the flogging, I guess.


Because I know it isn't bullshiat, no matter how much people says it is.  Truth is not a popularity contest.

There are several different questions here, of course.

1. Children very rarely die from the disease.

This is the easiest to prove.

https://services.aap.org/en/pages/201​9​-novel-coronavirus-covid-19-infections​/children-and-covid-19-state-level-dat​a-report/

Mortality (43 states and NYC reported)*
Children were 0%-0.8% of all COVID-19 deaths, and 20 states reported zero child deaths
In states reporting, 0%-0.3% of all child COVID-19 cases resulted in death


arc-anglerfish-washpost-prod-washpost.s3.amazonaws.comView Full Size


2. Children rarely get seriously ill (defined here as sick enough to go to the hospital) when they get Covid.

(same link as above)

Hospitalizations (20 states and NYC reported)*
Children were 0.8%-2.9% of total reported hospitalizations, and between 0.6%-9% of all child COVID-19 cases resulted in hospitalization

cdc.govView Full Size


Also note that there's no breakdown in any of the above about pre-existing conditions in children.  It is quite likely that the vast majority of both hospitalizations and deaths in children are those who had pre-existing health conditions.

I hope everybody accepts that children almost never get seriously ill from the disease and fewer still die (one source up there says out of 160k deaths in the US, less than 200 were under 25 year old).

3. How much do children spread the disease?

Now, this is the sixty thousand dollar question.  Data here is more mixed.  Some indications are that they very rarely spread it:

https://pediatrics.aappublications.or​g​/content/146/2/e2020004879

In this issue of Pediatrics, Posfay-Barbe et al6 report on the dynamics of COVID-19 within families of children with reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in Geneva, Switzerland. From March 10 to April 10, 2020, all children <16 years of age diagnosed at Geneva University Hospital (N = 40) underwent contact tracing to identify infected household contacts (HHCs). Of 39 evaluable households, in only 3 (8%) was a child the suspected index case, with symptom onset preceding illness in adult HHCs. In all other households, the child developed symptoms after or concurrent with adult HHCs, suggesting that the child was not the source of infection and that children most frequently acquire COVID-19 from adults, rather than transmitting it to them.

These findings are consistent with other recently published HHC investigations in China. Of 68 children with confirmed COVID-19 admitted to Qingdao Women's and Children's Hospital from January 20 to February 27, 2020, and with complete epidemiological data, 65 (95.59%) patients were HHCs of previously infected adults.7 Of 10 children hospitalized outside Wuhan, China, in only 1 was there possible child to adult transmission, based on symptom chronology.8 Similarly, transmission of SARS-CoV-2 by children outside household settings seems uncommon, although information is limited. In an intriguing study from France, a 9-year-old boy with respiratory symptoms associated with picornavirus, influenza A, and SARS-CoV-2 coinfection was found to have exposed over 80 classmates at 3 schools; no secondary contacts became infected, despite numerous influenza infections within the schools, suggesting an environment conducive to respiratory virus transmission.9 In New South Wales, Australia, 9 students and 9 staff infected with SARS-CoV-2 across 15 schools had close contact with a total of 735 students and 128 staff.10 Only 2 secondary infections were identified, none in adult staff; 1 student in primary school was potentially infected by a staff member, and 1 student in high school was potentially infected via exposure to 2 infected schoolmates.


Other studies show that children spread it more often.

And somebody will inevitably point out that there might be long term consequences for getting the disease we don't know much about yet.

I think I've proved that, in the short term, the chances of death to under 18 year olds without pre-existing medical conditions is nearly zero and the chances of serious illness to such is almost as low.  If you don't believe that, go listen to Trump or some other pitchman of false info because the science there is solid.

So, two questions remain:

1. Do children spread the virus much, especially to adults?

2. Are there hidden negative consequences to children getting the disease that will cause problems later in life?

For #1, there is mixed evidence.  Some sources say children spread it less, some say otherwise.  More data is needed (and will basically be provided as red state school districts open).

For #2, only time can really tell.  If it's stuff that only causes problems decades down the line, we have to wait decades to find out.

Keep in mind there are social, economic, educational, and developmental issues with not sending children back to school.

It's a balancing act.  Nobody has all the answers.
 
2020-08-03 12:19:38 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-03 12:21:16 PM  

inglixthemad: RedPhoenix122: I want my son to attend school in person.  He needs the social interaction, esp since that's where he's struggling right now.

I'm also not willing to put him, or anyone else, at risk.

I'm furious because this could have been fixed but it's been grossly mishandled at every single farking step.

Know a lot of parents that would prefer in person instruction, but are not planning on it because they don't want the disease vector added. They don't put it that way, however preferring to just say:

"I'm not risking my kid being one of the few dying."


Yep.  Then there's the long term effects which we don't even know about yet.  Forcing a child to go back to school in this environment could mess up their entire future and we don't even know it.
 
2020-08-03 12:23:55 PM  

vestona22: There are a number of either non-partisan (CDC, AAP) or outright left wing (AFT, NEA) organizations calling for in-person learning. So despite those blaming Trump, it's more complicated than just yes or no.  Some school's simply don't have the resources to support a hybrid model.  Some parents (esp lower income) don't have tablets/laptops for each (or any) child or don't have net access.  And there are plenty of parents calling for in-person learning.

That said, it needs to happen correctly.  Just recently here in Georgia, a YMCA summer camp had half their kids catch the plague because, guess what, the camp didn't make them wear masks (only the counselors).  On this morning's news they were covering my local school district's return to the classroom and guess what, the kids won't be required to wear masks, only the teachers.  For educators they sure seem dumb.


I'm assuming (I know, bad me) you are in one of two counties in the ATL Metro that opened schools today, both of which still allow online classes.

Sadly, I fully expect an explosion of new cases in the coming weeks.
 
2020-08-03 12:26:24 PM  

LegacyDL: Geotpf: As some school districts, mostly in red states or red areas of blue states, move towards full in person instruction, we shall soon have a mass of data about exactly how much, or how little, children get the virus, get sick, get seriously sick, die, and spread it to adults and other children. I've argued in the past that all of the above should be fairly low numbers (especially deaths, especially those from children without previous medical conditions-all previous indications are that this number should be very close to zero (there have only been something like 228 deaths from under 18-year olds nationwide, out of the 160k Covid deaths overall)), but I dunno if "fairly low" will really be low enough to open safely.  I completely understand why parents are protective of their children, although the largest real world concern will be if they spread the disease to their teachers and older family members.

You sound managerial. People aren't "numbers" for you to analyze on your spreadsheets.


You sound emotional.  There's always tradeoffs.

If you are shocked by the number of deaths of children by Covid, you'd be amazing by the number of deaths by the killing machine that is the automobile!  Why aren't you pushing to have cars banned, or at least restrict them to 10 MPH?  Because that would be silly, of course.  Never mind that four thousand children die in motor vehicle crashes annually (as opposed to less than 200 Covid deaths).  So, more than twenty times as many.

https://www.usnews.com/news/health-new​s/articles/2018-12-19/car-crashes-guns​-killed-the-most-us-children-and-teens​-in-2016 (fark won't make this linkable; copy/paste)
 
2020-08-03 12:26:36 PM  
I'm not sending my kids back to school until there's a widely-available vaccine or effective treatment.  I know my kids need the education and social interaction, but I'm a Gen-X single father.  I have boomer parents, one who would not survive an infection.  I will not risk it.

I know this will set my kids' development back years.  Yet those who are willing to accept the odds, which are not bad, will have an edge on my kids possibly for the rest of their lives.  Some of them will die, sure.  But most won't, and my kids will be less able to compete with them.

This is the choice America has forced on me.  fark this country's willful ignorance, incompetent leadership, cowardice, and abandonment of its core ideals.  I will never stand for its anthem again, and I regret the years I gave in service to it.
 
2020-08-03 12:27:48 PM  
I just saw a feature on Estonian schools on CNN. They went heavily into e-learning in ~2015, with all digitized textbooks and tests, and when the 'Rona came, they merely stopped the in-school teaching and went all remote, essentially without interruption.

OTOH, we have freedom here in the U.S. of A, as evidenced by parents being required to send their children into a cloud of toxic droplets to rapidly infect everyone in the country. So just millions of Freedom Deaths.
 
2020-08-03 12:28:26 PM  
Around here the parents are all over the board trying to figure out how to make school work
The one thing I have seen is more questions being asked about homeschooling
Seems some parents have had enough of the school systems lack of planning

My 9 y/o grandson didnt do so hot with the online classes this spring
Doesnt seem to matter to the 3 y/o he doesnt stop for anything

I dont know Sometimes I wish I could just stop banging my head against the wall
 
2020-08-03 12:31:00 PM  

meat0918: BullBearMS: Meh.  The studies we have show that grade school kids who are the most in need of socialization are the least effected demographic.  They are mildly effected and don't appear to be spreading it.

Once you hit puberty, the risks go up.

The teachers, teacher's aides, coaches, administration, lunch ladies, and janitors all thank you for your concern.


If you read the associated link from the Pasteur Institute, you'll see that the kids aren't spreading it to the adults.

The kids can possibly catch a mild case if an adult in their household is infected, but they don't spread it to others.

Once you hit puberty, things change, but for the younger kids most in need of socialization, the science (so far) says they aren't at risk and aren't putting others at risk.
 
2020-08-03 12:31:57 PM  
Geotpf:

You sound emotional.  There's always tradeoffs.

I sure hope you never get Covid and spend 2 weeks alone, wondering if you were going to die, and wondering who you may have spread it to, and if they will die.  Gosh, I sure hope that never happens.  Because that would be a terrible thing to happen.  To you.
 
2020-08-03 12:35:06 PM  

AcneVulgaris: Geotpf: although the largest real world concern will be if they spread the disease to their teachers and older family members.

If?

It's not like they spread cold, flu, lice, pinkeye, and whatever else the filthy little window lickers pick up.


The adults working at a school would be more at risk from the other adults working at the school.

The kids would be fine.

Once the kids get past puberty, then it makes more sense to keep the Junior High and High School classes online.
 
2020-08-03 12:37:13 PM  

BullBearMS: AcneVulgaris: Geotpf: although the largest real world concern will be if they spread the disease to their teachers and older family members.

If?

It's not like they spread cold, flu, lice, pinkeye, and whatever else the filthy little window lickers pick up.

The adults working at a school would be more at risk from the other adults working at the school.

The kids would be fine.

Once the kids get past puberty, then it makes more sense to keep the Junior High and High School classes online.


You know this how, and what does puberty have to do with disease transmission?
 
2020-08-03 12:39:36 PM  

AcneVulgaris: BullBearMS: AcneVulgaris: Geotpf: although the largest real world concern will be if they spread the disease to their teachers and older family members.

If?

It's not like they spread cold, flu, lice, pinkeye, and whatever else the filthy little window lickers pick up.

The adults working at a school would be more at risk from the other adults working at the school.

The kids would be fine.

Once the kids get past puberty, then it makes more sense to keep the Junior High and High School classes online.

You know this how, and what does puberty have to do with disease transmission?


There is this thing called Science.  You should look into it.

Remember when Fark used to claim to believe so strongly in science when we were making fun of antivaxxers all those years?
 
2020-08-03 12:40:45 PM  

Meat's dream: Geotpf:

You sound emotional.  There's always tradeoffs.

I sure hope you never get Covid and spend 2 weeks alone, wondering if you were going to die, and wondering who you may have spread it to, and if they will die.  Gosh, I sure hope that never happens.  Because that would be a terrible thing to happen.  To you.


I'm an adult, so I'm taking appropriate measures.  I was responding to somebody who was shocked that <200 deaths out of 160,000 being people under 25.

If you think that's too high, I hope you have been living in your bunker with no human contact, eating MREs for the past six months, because you are probably an adult and therefore have a much higher chance of dying.  You might even be 50+, or 65+, with a much much much much much much much much much higher chance of dying.

Children are basically not dying from this disease, especially those without pre-existing conditions (who definitely should not be going to in-person school).
 
2020-08-03 12:45:53 PM  

TheYeti: I would have liked to have seen some type of plan to mitigate risks but have kids in school part time on a rotational basis, or have them divided into local learning pods or something based on geography.  But, no, no one paid attention or did what they were supposed to do to get the risk low enough.

Interestingly, where I live the preschools will open but there will be no regular school for the public schools until January.  Private schools are closed until 10/1 at which time they will revisit the possibility of partial opening.


Our district currently plans to offer the rotation option (M/T or R/F, cleaning on W). The problem with that is many parents will still need a place to send their kids on the other days. So if they're not in school, they're in some other daycare situation... and now you just ruined the whole point of rotation.

They need to prioritize on that demographic. Give priority to the kids who are on free meal programs; there is probably a high overlap between them and low-income two-earner households. People like my wife and I are fine; we're both working from home and I managed to homeschool the kids for the last few months. It's a bit of a hassle and of course the kids are missing out on some things, but we can suck it up for another year. There are a lot of people who can't, and they're not available during the day for Fark debates or school board lobbying for precisely the reason they need a solution the most.
 
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