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(The Atlantic)   The push to reopen schools is doomed to fail   (theatlantic.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Figure It Out, School, Teacher, Epidemiology, High school, Federal government, Infection, pandemic summer  
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330 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 03 Aug 2020 at 9:15 AM (7 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



38 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-08-02 10:18:36 PM  
The part is still find funny is articles written now could have and should have been last April. The failure of trump to act with basic competency in April decided what will occur in the fall.
 
2020-08-02 10:26:26 PM  
Within two weeks of opening schools in communities with high virus transmission, teachers will become ill. All it will take is for a single teacher to become hospitalized with COVID and everything will shut down."
Hotez has good reason to be pessimistic. There were 68,605 new cases in the United States yesterday.
 
2020-08-03 12:11:32 AM  
The school of hard knocks.
 
2020-08-03 5:28:11 AM  
The right-wingers here in PA (and I"m sure elsewhere) are trying to use a global pandemic, 150,000+ dead Americans, and terrified parents to...break teacher unions and funnel more tax dollars to private schools.
 
2020-08-03 5:40:34 AM  
NO shiat.
 
2020-08-03 6:27:52 AM  
The difficulty also lies in every school district has its own plans. The State can impose guidelines for all to follow, but each school board determines policy as well, adding layers, and very few districts are working together with their neighbors. Which means that sports are going to be difficult to coordinate, as each school has differing standards and practices. Heck, half the districts in Mass are STILL debating an opening date, remote learning, fees for PPE for students and teachers--some as high as $65 a day. Plus, there are difficulties for child care for those kids who are going to use remote learning if both parents work...it's a patchwork quilt of difficulties, and Mass is handling things fairly well, transmission rate-wise. But we have colleges about to reconvene, and that means a whole lot of folks from states that aren't doing as well, and it's gonna be a mess. And there are certainly a lot of foreign students who are deferring a semester to see how it all shakes out, and I can't blame them.
 
2020-08-03 6:42:40 AM  
A goddamned disaster if they do? Sure. Absofarkinglutely. But a lot of schools actually are going to reopen, so not exactly a fail for Re-Opening Cheer Team Alpha. They don't exactly have everybody's best interests in mind, though.
 
2020-08-03 6:57:41 AM  
I don't really see what the big deal is.

You get the kids in a line as they're coming into the classroom. You take each of their temperatures, then you spray them down with Lysol and give them each one of those little Listerine bottles.

Problem solved.

I honestly don't know why our elected leaders can't figure this stuff out on their own.
 
2020-08-03 7:07:21 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size


Now that we've finally had wider-spread mask mandates, the curve is starting to flatten. Schools in GA are opening today. I wonder what we can expect to happen over the next two months.
 
2020-08-03 7:35:18 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-03 7:41:17 AM  

Boondock3806: Now that we've finally had wider-spread mask mandates the numbers going directly to Trump's HHS rather than the CDC, the curve is starting to flatten

Fark user imageView Full Size

/FTFY
 
2020-08-03 7:46:02 AM  
Yup. Our principal pretty much admitted that one positive case will cause the school to shut down for two weeks. So my kid is going fully remote. It'll be less disruptive than going two days in, two weeks out, repeat.
 
2020-08-03 8:02:46 AM  
I think the Georgia summer camp proved this is a very bad idea.

the real question is how many kids, teachers and family members of both need to die before everyone admits this is a bad idea. more than a thousand people a day have been dying for the last week. seems like a lot of people in the US are too stupid to take this seriously until it impacts them directly. at the rate we are going that will happen by Thanksgiving.

wear a mask. I had it in March and five months later I am still suffering lingering effects. it is not fun. you really do not want this.
 
2020-08-03 8:09:43 AM  

kudayta: Boondock3806: Now that we've finally had wider-spread mask mandates the numbers going directly to Trump's HHS rather than the CDC, the curve is starting to flatten

[Fark user image image 801x1285]/FTFY


Damn. Never saw this.
 
2020-08-03 8:13:18 AM  

kudayta: Boondock3806: Now that we've finally had wider-spread mask mandates the numbers going directly to Trump's HHS rather than the CDC, the curve is starting to flatten

[Fark user image 801x1285]/FTFY


I wanted to submit this as its own fark thread, but surprisingly the video is now set to "private" on YouTube.

Censorship?
 
2020-08-03 8:18:32 AM  
I haven't really studied this, so take it with a grain of salt.
The two worst types of people that can gather in large groups during this time are children and drunk people.
 
2020-08-03 8:52:00 AM  

chucknasty: I think the Georgia summer camp proved this is a very bad idea.

the real question is how many kids, teachers and family members of both need to die before everyone admits this is a bad idea.


This may sound bad but it has to happen to the people who are "not worried" about it.  It is seemingly impossible to get through to these people that even if they don't suffer from it, they are likely going to spread it to someone who will if their attitude is one of "not worrying".

And what is really bad is that may not even work.  This thing was made political by right-wingers from the get-go and many right-wingers are so emotionally invested in their politics that even *getting* the damn virus isn't enough to make them reflect on their destructive and/or toxic attitudes.
 
2020-08-03 9:13:49 AM  

kudayta: Boondock3806: Now that we've finally had wider-spread mask mandates the numbers going directly to Trump's HHS rather than the CDC, the curve is starting to flatten

[Fark user image 801x1285]/FTFY


yep.  ArsTechnica had an article last friday how covid data is all farked up now, with one of the top comments mentioning the flattening of the trend line since July 16th
 
2020-08-03 9:35:23 AM  

sirrerun: I haven't really studied this, so take it with a grain of salt.
The two worst types of people that can gather in large groups during this time are children and drunk people.


Basically, anyone with poor impulse control.

"Okay kids, instead of 'the floor is lava' we're going to play 'everyone else is lava.' If you touch another person, you're 'out' and have to go home for two weeks. Ready? Go!"
 
2020-08-03 9:39:21 AM  
the whole farking world is over this, and it's just getting worse in america. farking pathetic. you are the shiathole country.
 
2020-08-03 9:57:51 AM  

some_beer_drinker: the whole farking world is over this


*citations needed*
 
2020-08-03 10:15:13 AM  
I heard a really good local example where a school district is opening up a week EARLY.  The stated logic is that someone is going to get sick and the school is going to get shut down, so they want to get in as much face-to-face time as possible before that happens.

They aren't even pretending anymore.  It's hard for me to imagine the mindset you would have to be in for that to make sense.  What kind of parent would willing to send their kid into the buzz saw like that.
 
2020-08-03 10:49:54 AM  
Here in Georgia, the most populous districts are remaining online while the Real American districts are insistent on in-person instruction.   I say go for it.  It generally takes too long for Real America to get the things it asks for.  Coronavirus is swift.
 
2020-08-03 11:07:33 AM  

hubiestubert: Heck, half the districts in Mass are STILL debating an opening date, remote learning, fees for PPE for students and teachers--some as high as $65 a day.


Public school districts are trying to charge students $65 a day for PPE?  Hahahaha that ain't happening.
 
2020-08-03 11:08:21 AM  
School will be open but my kids will be watching online at least until I see how bad it is.
 
2020-08-03 11:09:50 AM  

Rapmaster2000: Here in Georgia, the most populous districts are remaining online while the Real American districts are insistent on in-person instruction.   I say go for it.  It generally takes too long for Real America to get the things it asks for.  Coronavirus is swift.


The "good" news here is that there will be lots of new data for exactly how often children get the virus/get sick/get seriously sick/die/spread the disease to other children and to adults.
 
2020-08-03 11:18:53 AM  

Geotpf: Rapmaster2000: Here in Georgia, the most populous districts are remaining online while the Real American districts are insistent on in-person instruction.   I say go for it.  It generally takes too long for Real America to get the things it asks for.  Coronavirus is swift.

The "good" news here is that there will be lots of new data for exactly how often children get the virus/get sick/get seriously sick/die/spread the disease to other children and to adults.


How I feel at this point:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-03 11:32:26 AM  
Christian Pro Life Family Values!!!!!!11!1!!11!1
 
BBH
2020-08-03 11:51:32 AM  

Boondock3806: [Fark user image image 850x260]

Now that we've finally had wider-spread mask mandates, the curve is starting to flatten. Schools in GA are opening today. I wonder what we can expect to happen over the next two months.


Lets see what happens when those 200 campers and their siblings go back to school.
 
BBH
2020-08-03 11:53:20 AM  

sirrerun: I haven't really studied this, so take it with a grain of salt.
The two worst types of people that can gather in large groups during this time are children and drunk people.


That is true at any time.
 
2020-08-03 12:04:43 PM  
One of the reasons we've been seeing low infection and death rates in children is because we locked them down for 6 months and limited contact with other disease vectors...I mean their peers.

We do not have the necessary data to determine how hard the virus will hit schools and the damage it will do because it hasn't been tested in that scenario.  We can see how it hit the adult population because adults still had to carry on with their lives.  Children have been sitting at home since spring break with minimal contact.  Kids, especially young children, are notorious for carrying diseases and passing them around.

It's going to be scary going into this school year almost blind to what can accurately be predicted.  Our data set is woefully incomplete
 
2020-08-03 12:21:46 PM  

RogermcAllen: I heard a really good local example where a school district is opening up a week EARLY.  The stated logic is that someone is going to get sick and the school is going to get shut down, so they want to get in as much face-to-face time as possible before that happens.

They aren't even pretending anymore.  It's hard for me to imagine the mindset you would have to be in for that to make sense.  What kind of parent would willing to send their kid into the buzz saw like that.


I can only think that they started early because, let's face it, the virus is going to explode right after kids are off for the long Labor Day weekend.
 
2020-08-03 1:27:27 PM  

Raug the Dwarf: One of the reasons we've been seeing low infection and death rates in children is because we locked them down for 6 months and limited contact with other disease vectors...I mean their peers.

We do not have the necessary data to determine how hard the virus will hit schools and the damage it will do because it hasn't been tested in that scenario.  We can see how it hit the adult population because adults still had to carry on with their lives.  Children have been sitting at home since spring break with minimal contact.  Kids, especially young children, are notorious for carrying diseases and passing them around.

It's going to be scary going into this school year almost blind to what can accurately be predicted.  Our data set is woefully incomplete


This right here. The "Kids don't get sick from this" myth has already been dispelled in TX when they started reporting infant cases.

I have a 7 year old and 5 year old starting school in a few weeks. If schools close I will probably need to hire someone to be at my home for 4-5 hours a day as I don't have enough flexibility, even working remotely, to not be available during core business hours, and even if the learning is all on-demand where it could be done at night there's no way the kids will stay out of my hair unsupervised.

To make matters worse, our school district started a multi-year consolidation plan in 2019, so my kids will be in a building designed specifically to be a SAGE school with small class sizes catering to low income and special needs learners, and instead now has double classrooms in most rooms. Voluntary virtual instruction was offered, but I can almost guarantee few, if any, parents at this school opted in, so you're looking at 30+ kid classroom with two teachers plus SPED support staff in most classrooms, while our old school is sitting vacant and unused 2 blocks from my house.
 
2020-08-03 2:02:12 PM  

Boondock3806: [Fark user image 850x260]

Now that we've finally had wider-spread mask mandates, the curve is starting to flatten. Schools in GA are opening today. I wonder what we can expect to happen over the next two months.


Flattening the curve was never about cases.  It was about care capacity.

Your graph is silly and 3 months behind where we flattened the curve
 
2020-08-03 2:08:44 PM  

I sound fat: Boondock3806: [Fark user image 850x260]

Now that we've finally had wider-spread mask mandates, the curve is starting to flatten. Schools in GA are opening today. I wonder what we can expect to happen over the next two months.

Flattening the curve was never about cases.  It was about care capacity.

Your graph is silly and 3 months behind where we flattened the curve


My graph was lifted off of CDC.gov this morning. And smarter critiques of it have already been accepted. Thanks tho
 
2020-08-03 4:17:37 PM  
Yeah, I remember when there was that push to plaster the world in farking rainbows.

"It'll make the kids happy."

I thought it was dangerous because it gave people a false sense that everything was just fine.

fark your rainbows.

And I told you so.
 
2020-08-03 4:18:42 PM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: The right-wingers here in PA (and I"m sure elsewhere) are trying to use a global pandemic, 150,000+ dead Americans, and terrified parents to...break teacher unions and funnel more tax dollars to private schools.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-08-03 4:26:50 PM  

Raug the Dwarf: One of the reasons we've been seeing low infection and death rates in children is because we locked them down for 6 months and limited contact with other disease vectors...I mean their peers.

We do not have the necessary data to determine how hard the virus will hit schools and the damage it will do because it hasn't been tested in that scenario.  We can see how it hit the adult population because adults still had to carry on with their lives.  Children have been sitting at home since spring break with minimal contact.  Kids, especially young children, are notorious for carrying diseases and passing them around.

It's going to be scary going into this school year almost blind to what can accurately be predicted.  Our data set is woefully incomplete


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
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