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(Asia Times)   How strong is deformed Chinese concrete?   (asiatimes.com) divider line
    More: Scary, Three Gorges Dam, Yangtze River, Hubei, Yichang, reservoir of the Three Gorges Dam, cubic meters, Chongqing, Monday evening  
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8902 clicks; posted to Main » on 30 Jul 2020 at 4:31 AM (8 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-30 3:54:37 AM  
"The Yangtze has again become a raging torrent. On Monday evening, stormwater started to pour into the reservoir of the Three Gorges Dam in the Yangtze's middle reaches at more than 60,000 cubic meters per second."

For comparison's sake, here is the average discharge of several American rivers:

Mississippi River: 17,000 cubic meters per second
St. Lawrance River: 7,800 cubic meters per second at U.S.-Canada boundary
Columbia River: 7,700
Yukon River: 6,500

However, there was this to say about the MIssissippi River flood in 2011:

"Although the size of the flooding is unknown, there are several indications of its severity. The Mississippi River is currently flowing at 2 million cubic feet per second (609,600 cubic meters per second) in Memphis, which is comparable to a football field of water at a height of 44 ft (13.4 m) per second. (Source, May 11, 2011)"

/I'd post more but I need a potty break now
 
2020-07-30 4:44:20 AM  
Yu Shi has been busy.  Stay safe, Chinese farkers... you can read Fark in China, right?
 
2020-07-30 4:44:27 AM  

evilsofa: "The Yangtze has again become a raging torrent. On Monday evening, stormwater started to pour into the reservoir of the Three Gorges Dam in the Yangtze's middle reaches at more than 60,000 cubic meters per second."

For comparison's sake, here is the average discharge of several American rivers:

Mississippi River: 17,000 cubic meters per second
St. Lawrance River: 7,800 cubic meters per second at U.S.-Canada boundary
Columbia River: 7,700
Yukon River: 6,500

However, there was this to say about the MIssissippi River flood in 2011:

"Although the size of the flooding is unknown, there are several indications of its severity. The Mississippi River is currently flowing at 2 million cubic feet per second (609,600 cubic meters per second) in Memphis, which is comparable to a football field of water at a height of 44 ft (13.4 m) per second. (Source, May 11, 2011)"

/I'd post more but I need a potty break now


You seem to have converted that using the foot/meter ratio. You need to cube that. One cubic foot is .0283 cubic meters. So the 2m cubic feet of water in your quote is 56.6k cubic meters. Which, incidentally, is just below where the Yangtze is at right now.
 
2020-07-30 4:47:48 AM  

Algebrat: evilsofa: "The Yangtze has again become a raging torrent. On Monday evening, stormwater started to pour into the reservoir of the Three Gorges Dam in the Yangtze's middle reaches at more than 60,000 cubic meters per second."

For comparison's sake, here is the average discharge of several American rivers:

Mississippi River: 17,000 cubic meters per second
St. Lawrance River: 7,800 cubic meters per second at U.S.-Canada boundary
Columbia River: 7,700
Yukon River: 6,500

However, there was this to say about the MIssissippi River flood in 2011:

"Although the size of the flooding is unknown, there are several indications of its severity. The Mississippi River is currently flowing at 2 million cubic feet per second (609,600 cubic meters per second) in Memphis, which is comparable to a football field of water at a height of 44 ft (13.4 m) per second. (Source, May 11, 2011)"

/I'd post more but I need a potty break now

You seem to have converted that using the foot/meter ratio. You need to cube that. One cubic foot is .0283 cubic meters. So the 2m cubic feet of water in your quote is 56.6k cubic meters. Which, incidentally, is just below where the Yangtze is at right now.


Oh, sorry, you didn't screw that up, your source did. I see an editor that needs a paddlin'.
 
2020-07-30 4:48:38 AM  
In other words it's time to book a flight to China?! I understand there will be a lot of hot, wet chinese woman?
 
2020-07-30 4:49:32 AM  
It's still 10k m3/s under its record level though.

I do take issue with the claim that it could withstand a nuclear bomb.  Really?  I honestly have no idea.  A small one maybe?
 
2020-07-30 4:52:49 AM  
China makes iphones and computers, it's rude to denigrate their buildings and accomplishments
 
2020-07-30 4:53:56 AM  

The Envoy: It's still 10k m3/s under its record level though.

I do take issue with the claim that it could withstand a nuclear bomb.  Really?  I honestly have no idea.  A small one maybe?


Hey, the way this year is going we just might find out.
 
2020-07-30 4:57:17 AM  
Can jet fuel melt it?
 
2020-07-30 5:02:22 AM  

Invalid Litter Dept: Yu Shi has been busy.  Stay safe, Chinese farkers... you can read Fark in China, right?


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-30 5:03:04 AM  
Wasn't one of the issues of this mega damn was how silty the water is and overtime the reservoir at the dam would built up with sediments until the damn is basically useless ???
I guess its possible to control the sediment to a point but then that's putting A LOT of trust in the Chinese Gov, who are more trust worthy than the Trump Administration but still not exactly a group you'd trust.
 
2020-07-30 5:03:50 AM  
 
2020-07-30 5:13:37 AM  
24-Yangtse Kiang Sketch (Monty Python's Previous Record Subtitulado Español)
Youtube bqymo3K8Cxg
 
2020-07-30 5:14:05 AM  
i.dailymail.co.ukView Full Size


Run for your lives!!!
 
2020-07-30 5:24:37 AM  

The Envoy: It's still 10k m3/s under its record level though.

I do take issue with the claim that it could withstand a nuclear bomb.  Really?  I honestly have no idea.  A small one maybe?


Or a big one dropped far away, or a medium one high in the sky.
 
2020-07-30 5:27:41 AM  

PerryWinnwet: The Envoy: It's still 10k m3/s under its record level though.

I do take issue with the claim that it could withstand a nuclear bomb.  Really?  I honestly have no idea.  A small one maybe?

Or a big one dropped far away, or a medium one high in the sky.


Exactly, it's a pointless measure.  And why nuke it?  Nuke a big city and do more damage.  For some reason I find it a really irritating statement.

Why yes, I am baked, why do you ask?
 
2020-07-30 5:38:05 AM  

evilsofa: "The Yangtze has again become a raging torrent. On Monday evening, stormwater started to pour into the reservoir of the Three Gorges Dam in the Yangtze's middle reaches at more than 60,000 cubic meters per second."

For comparison's sake, here is the average discharge of several American rivers:

Mississippi River: 17,000 cubic meters per second
St. Lawrance River: 7,800 cubic meters per second at U.S.-Canada boundary
Columbia River: 7,700
Yukon River: 6,500

However, there was this to say about the MIssissippi River flood in 2011:

"Although the size of the flooding is unknown, there are several indications of its severity. The Mississippi River is currently flowing at 2 million cubic feet per second (609,600 cubic meters per second) in Memphis, which is comparable to a football field of water at a height of 44 ft (13.4 m) per second. (Source, May 11, 2011)"

/I'd post more but I need a potty break now


I worked at some of the hydroelectric facilities on the mid-Columbia (downstream from Grand Coulee but upstream from where the Snake river dumps into the Columbia). During my time there, the highest discharge through the facilities I ever witnessed was ~500,000 cubic feet per second (~14,100 cubic meters/second) during the spring runoff after a particularly wet winter. By late summer flows are usually considerably lower, ~50,000 to ~150,000 cubic feet per second depending on the time of day. Sometimes they could even be as low as 10,000 cubic feet per second. Though a daily average minimum of 30,000 cubic feet per second was required to keep the nuke plant down the river from melting down.

I used the following example to try and illustrate exactly how much water was passing through the facility on the tours I would give to engineering students and other folks:

At full load, each of our turbines will pass 18,000 cubic feet of water per second. Picture an average house in your mind. This is probably around an 1800 square foot house. If we assume it has a little bit higher ceilings than normal at 10 feet, this means that each turbine is passing a house full of water every second.

Using said example, the plant running at full capacity was 10 houses of water per second. The highest spring runoff I saw was 28 houses per second, and Three Gorges is passing close to or above 120 houses per second.
 
2020-07-30 5:38:50 AM  

The Envoy: PerryWinnwet: The Envoy: It's still 10k m3/s under its record level though.

I do take issue with the claim that it could withstand a nuclear bomb.  Really?  I honestly have no idea.  A small one maybe?

Or a big one dropped far away, or a medium one high in the sky.

Exactly, it's a pointless measure.  And why nuke it?  Nuke a big city and do more damage.  For some reason I find it a really irritating statement.

Why yes, I am baked, why do you ask?


In theory wouldn't taking out the dam destroy more with one weapon?
 
2020-07-30 5:49:40 AM  

Hillbilly Jim: The Envoy: PerryWinnwet: The Envoy: It's still 10k m3/s under its record level though.

I do take issue with the claim that it could withstand a nuclear bomb.  Really?  I honestly have no idea.  A small one maybe?

Or a big one dropped far away, or a medium one high in the sky.

Exactly, it's a pointless measure.  And why nuke it?  Nuke a big city and do more damage.  For some reason I find it a really irritating statement.

Why yes, I am baked, why do you ask?

In theory wouldn't taking out the dam destroy more with one weapon?


I don't know, that's the question.  What size nuke?  What city?  Beijing with a giant one?  Or dam with a little one?  We haven't even set terms of reference for "big" or "little"!

Are you baked too?
 
2020-07-30 6:04:32 AM  
i.imgflip.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-30 6:15:32 AM  

The Envoy: Hillbilly Jim: The Envoy: PerryWinnwet: The Envoy: It's still 10k m3/s under its record level though.

I do take issue with the claim that it could withstand a nuclear bomb.  Really?  I honestly have no idea.  A small one maybe?

Or a big one dropped far away, or a medium one high in the sky.

Exactly, it's a pointless measure.  And why nuke it?  Nuke a big city and do more damage.  For some reason I find it a really irritating statement.

Why yes, I am baked, why do you ask?

In theory wouldn't taking out the dam destroy more with one weapon?

I don't know, that's the question.  What size nuke?  What city?  Beijing with a giant one?  Or dam with a little one?  We haven't even set terms of reference for "big" or "little"!

Are you baked too?


I can neither confirm or deny that, next question.
 
2020-07-30 6:29:42 AM  
China needs beavers.
 
2020-07-30 6:31:23 AM  

evilsofa: "The Yangtze has again become a raging torrent. On Monday evening, stormwater started to pour into the reservoir of the Three Gorges Dam in the Yangtze's middle reaches at more than 60,000 cubic meters per second."

For comparison's sake, here is the average discharge of several American rivers:

Mississippi River: 17,000 cubic meters per second
St. Lawrance River: 7,800 cubic meters per second at U.S.-Canada boundary
Columbia River: 7,700
Yukon River: 6,500

However, there was this to say about the MIssissippi River flood in 2011:

"Although the size of the flooding is unknown, there are several indications of its severity. The Mississippi River is currently flowing at 2 million cubic feet per second (609,600 cubic meters per second) in Memphis, which is comparable to a football field of water at a height of 44 ft (13.4 m) per second. (Source, May 11, 2011)"

/I'd post more but I need a potty break now


Potty break?  Just post on your phone while on your potty break.   Half the time, that's when I post on Fark.

Maybe I'm even doing it now.....
 
2020-07-30 6:38:00 AM  
how is deformed chinese conccrete formed?
 
2020-07-30 6:38:37 AM  

phishrace: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 850x510]

Run for your lives!!!


damn
 
2020-07-30 6:46:53 AM  

EvilElecBlanket: phishrace: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 850x510]

Run for your lives!!!

damn


lh3.googleusercontent.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-30 6:57:14 AM  
I bet you can melt it with burning jet fuel.
 
2020-07-30 7:02:57 AM  

Hillbilly Jim: The Envoy: PerryWinnwet: The Envoy: It's still 10k m3/s under its record level though.

I do take issue with the claim that it could withstand a nuclear bomb.  Really?  I honestly have no idea.  A small one maybe?

Or a big one dropped far away, or a medium one high in the sky.

Exactly, it's a pointless measure.  And why nuke it?  Nuke a big city and do more damage.  For some reason I find it a really irritating statement.

Why yes, I am baked, why do you ask?

In theory wouldn't taking out the dam destroy more with one weapon?


Probably poison up the water supply real nice, too, what with the tons of pulverized, irradiated concrete washing downstream.
 
2020-07-30 7:13:17 AM  
Wish they had web cams set up, if that thing bursts it is gonna suck to be downriver.
 
2020-07-30 7:15:17 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-30 7:19:03 AM  

JohnnyBoy69: evilsofa: "The Yangtze has again become a raging torrent. On Monday evening, stormwater started to pour into the reservoir of the Three Gorges Dam in the Yangtze's middle reaches at more than 60,000 cubic meters per second."

For comparison's sake, here is the average discharge of several American rivers:

Mississippi River: 17,000 cubic meters per second
St. Lawrance River: 7,800 cubic meters per second at U.S.-Canada boundary
Columbia River: 7,700
Yukon River: 6,500

However, there was this to say about the MIssissippi River flood in 2011:

"Although the size of the flooding is unknown, there are several indications of its severity. The Mississippi River is currently flowing at 2 million cubic feet per second (609,600 cubic meters per second) in Memphis, which is comparable to a football field of water at a height of 44 ft (13.4 m) per second. (Source, May 11, 2011)"

/I'd post more but I need a potty break now

I worked at some of the hydroelectric facilities on the mid-Columbia (downstream from Grand Coulee but upstream from where the Snake river dumps into the Columbia). During my time there, the highest discharge through the facilities I ever witnessed was ~500,000 cubic feet per second (~14,100 cubic meters/second) during the spring runoff after a particularly wet winter. By late summer flows are usually considerably lower, ~50,000 to ~150,000 cubic feet per second depending on the time of day. Sometimes they could even be as low as 10,000 cubic feet per second. Though a daily average minimum of 30,000 cubic feet per second was required to keep the nuke plant down the river from melting down.

I used the following example to try and illustrate exactly how much water was passing through the facility on the tours I would give to engineering students and other folks:

At full load, each of our turbines will pass 18,000 cubic feet of water per second. Picture an average house in your mind. This is probably around an 1800 square foot house. If we assume it has a little bit higher ceilings than normal at 10 feet, this means that each turbine is passing a house full of water every second.

Using said example, the plant running at full capacity was 10 houses of water per second. The highest spring runoff I saw was 28 houses per second, and Three Gorges is passing close to or above 120 houses per second.


Thank you for translating that into American English.
 
2020-07-30 7:20:44 AM  
If it keeps on raining, the levee's going to break.
 
2020-07-30 7:26:30 AM  

litheandnubile: China makes iphones and computers, it's rude to denigrate their buildings and accomplishments


Cheap and shoddy Chinese-made crap.
 
2020-07-30 7:43:09 AM  

Algebrat: Algebrat: evilsofa: "The Yangtze has again become a raging torrent. On Monday evening, stormwater started to pour into the reservoir of the Three Gorges Dam in the Yangtze's middle reaches at more than 60,000 cubic meters per second."

For comparison's sake, here is the average discharge of several American rivers:

Mississippi River: 17,000 cubic meters per second
St. Lawrance River: 7,800 cubic meters per second at U.S.-Canada boundary
Columbia River: 7,700
Yukon River: 6,500

However, there was this to say about the MIssissippi River flood in 2011:

"Although the size of the flooding is unknown, there are several indications of its severity. The Mississippi River is currently flowing at 2 million cubic feet per second (609,600 cubic meters per second) in Memphis, which is comparable to a football field of water at a height of 44 ft (13.4 m) per second. (Source, May 11, 2011)"

/I'd post more but I need a potty break now

You seem to have converted that using the foot/meter ratio. You need to cube that. One cubic foot is .0283 cubic meters. So the 2m cubic feet of water in your quote is 56.6k cubic meters. Which, incidentally, is just below where the Yangtze is at right now.

Oh, sorry, you didn't screw that up, your source did. I see an editor that needs a paddlin'.


More likely you see an editor that got laid off years ago...
 
2020-07-30 7:43:10 AM  

The Envoy: PerryWinnwet: The Envoy: It's still 10k m3/s under its record level though.

I do take issue with the claim that it could withstand a nuclear bomb.  Really?  I honestly have no idea.  A small one maybe?

Or a big one dropped far away, or a medium one high in the sky.

Exactly, it's a pointless measure.  And why nuke it?  Nuke a big city and do more damage.  For some reason I find it a really irritating statement.

Why yes, I am baked, why do you ask?


Actually if that dam goes I''m told it would do quite a lot of damage. We're talking major ecological and humanitarian disaster. Everyone down stream is f*cked. Their agricultural base would take a huge hit too which means even more people are f*cked. It would almost certainly put a dent in China's plans for global expansion which is about the only silver lining if it fails. The Chinese government has to be sh*tting themselves over the possibility of it failing.
 
2020-07-30 7:43:43 AM  

Atomic Jonb: [Fark user image image 850x566]


Haha, nice...

Wait, WTF happened to Rabbit's body?
 
2020-07-30 7:44:34 AM  

MechaPyx: The Envoy: PerryWinnwet: The Envoy: It's still 10k m3/s under its record level though.

I do take issue with the claim that it could withstand a nuclear bomb.  Really?  I honestly have no idea.  A small one maybe?

Or a big one dropped far away, or a medium one high in the sky.

Exactly, it's a pointless measure.  And why nuke it?  Nuke a big city and do more damage.  For some reason I find it a really irritating statement.

Why yes, I am baked, why do you ask?

Actually if that dam goes I''m told it would do quite a lot of damage. We're talking major ecological and humanitarian disaster. Everyone down stream is f*cked. Their agricultural base would take a huge hit too which means even more people are f*cked. It would almost certainly put a dent in China's plans for global expansion which is about the only silver lining if it fails. The Chinese government has to be sh*tting themselves over the possibility of it failing.


"Country that contributes heavily to global warming affected by climate change."

They can cry me a river :)
 
2020-07-30 7:50:26 AM  

The Envoy: It's still 10k m3/s under its record level though.

I do take issue with the claim that it could withstand a nuclear bomb.  Really?  I honestly have no idea.  A small one maybe?


Shiatloads of concrete is really about the best thing for resisting said bomb, at least assuming it doesn't have to do anything more than "Still be existing" after the hit.  Won't help with the tons of radiation, or the fact that said concrete is now so hot it's going melt/torch anything else anywhere near it, even if it wasn't directly exposed to the blast, but tons of concrete soaks heat energy pretty damn well.  The blast effect isn't going to annoy it all that much either so... yeah I wouldn't want to try it, but it's not out of the question.
 
2020-07-30 7:56:29 AM  

phishrace: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 850x510]

Run for your lives!!!


Came here to post this.  If I lived downriver from that dam I'd be moving to higher ground ASAP, I don't think it's gonna make it to it's expected lifespan.
 
2020-07-30 7:59:19 AM  

crinz83: how is deformed chinese conccrete formed?


Usually with dried and ground up Yak penises instead of cement.
 
2020-07-30 8:05:23 AM  
preview.telegraph.co.ukView Full Size
 
2020-07-30 8:10:13 AM  

basicstock: [preview.telegraph.co.uk image 460x288]


Every thread on Chinese construction.
 
2020-07-30 8:22:52 AM  

jso2897: If it keeps on raining, the levee's going to break.


that's catchy...go on...
 
2020-07-30 8:26:09 AM  

The Envoy: basicstock: [preview.telegraph.co.uk image 460x288]

Every thread on Chinese construction.


It's actually a slightly different photo each time; they keep doing it!
 
2020-07-30 8:26:59 AM  

basicstock: [preview.telegraph.co.uk image 460x288]


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-30 8:32:01 AM  

The Envoy: Hillbilly Jim: The Envoy: PerryWinnwet: The Envoy: It's still 10k m3/s under its record level though.

I do take issue with the claim that it could withstand a nuclear bomb.  Really?  I honestly have no idea.  A small one maybe?

Or a big one dropped far away, or a medium one high in the sky.

Exactly, it's a pointless measure.  And why nuke it?  Nuke a big city and do more damage.  For some reason I find it a really irritating statement.

Why yes, I am baked, why do you ask?

In theory wouldn't taking out the dam destroy more with one weapon?

I don't know, that's the question.  What size nuke?  What city?  Beijing with a giant one?  Or dam with a little one?  We haven't even set terms of reference for "big" or "little"!

Are you baked too?


I know a guy who can answer that question.
I think he would go to jail if he did though.
 
2020-07-30 8:37:02 AM  

Day_Old_Dutchie: litheandnubile: China makes iphones and computers, it's rude to denigrate their buildings and accomplishments

Cheap and shoddy Chinese-made crap.


I don't know, their virus seems pretty strong and resilient.
 
2020-07-30 8:41:31 AM  

powhound: In other words it's time to book a flight to China?! I understand there will be a lot of hot, wet chinese woman?


Oh Gilbert
 
2020-07-30 8:43:36 AM  

phishrace: [i.dailymail.co.uk image 850x510]

Run for your lives!!!


The photo in the article looks pretty straight.

The plan is to hold as much floodwater as possible to buy time for cities downstream to ramp up their defenses GTFO.
 
2020-07-30 8:47:06 AM  

The Envoy: PerryWinnwet: The Envoy: It's still 10k m3/s under its record level though.

I do take issue with the claim that it could withstand a nuclear bomb.  Really?  I honestly have no idea.  A small one maybe?

Or a big one dropped far away, or a medium one high in the sky.

Exactly, it's a pointless measure.  And why nuke it?  Nuke a big city and do more damage.  For some reason I find it a really irritating statement.

Why yes, I am baked, why do you ask?


Typical war tactic. When nukes are so prevalent, why the hell not?

If it happened, I imagine it would be like kids playing with fireworks for the first time. Truman must have had a huge boner under the desk.
 
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