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(Washington Post)   The US is flunking its collective cognitive assessment   (washingtonpost.com) divider line
    More: Fail, United States, federal government, Vice President of the United States, federal police, Federal property, Government of the United States, Democratic challenger Joe Biden, Disease Control  
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1130 clicks; posted to Politics » on 21 Jul 2020 at 4:30 PM (13 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



25 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-07-21 9:24:30 AM  
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2020-07-21 10:14:53 AM  
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2020-07-21 11:17:44 AM  
This seems part of why schools need to teach basic math and science -- if experts use math and science to conclude that public benefit requires policies that asshats don't like, asshats seem more likely to likely to reject the policy if they don't understand the math and/or science, which (in cases like this) gets more people killed, including those who aren't such asshats.
 
2020-07-21 12:11:32 PM  
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I see the problem. It's an elephant.
 
2020-07-21 12:40:16 PM  
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2020-07-21 4:17:24 PM  
Is there a term worse than flunking?
 
2020-07-21 4:36:34 PM  

Scorpitron is reduced to a thin red paste: Is there a term worse than flunking?


Trumping
 
2020-07-21 4:41:15 PM  
when the foundation of your beliefs is based on opposition to perceived enemies, you inevitably end up looking like a stupid asshole
 
2020-07-21 4:52:05 PM  

koder: [Fark user image image 720x464]


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2020-07-21 5:00:51 PM  
i.imgflip.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-21 5:12:55 PM  
I've always thought the Gary Larson cartoon showing the kid pushing on the door that says PULL was most illustrative of Americans. Most of them seem to think they're gifted.
 
2020-07-21 5:13:26 PM  

edmo: [Fark user image image 250x249]


Here is the full test.

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2020-07-21 5:26:53 PM  

thealgorerhythm: [images.indianexpress.com image 759x422]

I see the problem. It's an elephant.


It's an oliphant !

It's an Oliphant!
Youtube A9RaterHxyk
 
2020-07-21 5:30:59 PM  
Guess we need to put a MAGA hat on this guy:

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2020-07-21 5:42:53 PM  
Incorrect tense.
 
2020-07-21 5:45:23 PM  
No shiat. 40 years of Republican education cuts are bound to rear their ugly MAGA hats eventually.
 
2020-07-21 5:46:59 PM  
Is the Obvious tag self-isolating or something?

That line was crossed when pluralities in 60% of the states decided to elect a "billionaire" reality TV "star" and carnival sideshow to what had previously been the most powerful position in the world.
 
2020-07-21 5:50:07 PM  

Twilight Farkle: [i.imgur.com image 772x964]


Is this the sheet given the evaluator, as opposed to the subject?  Is it possible to get "clean" versions of both the subject and evaluator versions?

I would totally blow the delayed recall.
 
2020-07-21 5:52:41 PM  
Coulda told ya that on Nov 2016.
 
2020-07-21 6:08:53 PM  

flondrix: Is this the sheet given the evaluator, as opposed to the subject? Is it possible to get "clean" versions of both the subject and evaluator versions?

I would totally blow the delayed recall.


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There are multiple versions: Here are two, including the evaluation criteria: https://championsforhealth.org/wp-con​t​ent/uploads/2018/12/MOCA-8.1.8.2-Engli​sh.pdf. (PDF)

Presumably a clinician buys a subscription to it and there's a standardized subset of puzzles/words/animals/3D figures that get generated every few months in order to prevent long term patients from memorizing the answers.

The arithmetic skill of counting backwards by 7 is preserved, (because prime numbers are weird and there's relatively little everyday use for having to subtract by 7), but the starting point (100, 70, etc) can be changed from test to test without affecting the validity of the results. I'd speculate they all start at multiples of 10 because it's arguably "easier" to subtract 7 from, say, 77 than it is from 70.
 
2020-07-21 6:44:37 PM  

Twilight Farkle: flondrix: Is this the sheet given the evaluator, as opposed to the subject? Is it possible to get "clean" versions of both the subject and evaluator versions?

I would totally blow the delayed recall.

[Fark user image 365x512][Fark user image 350x458]
[Fark user image 650x240]

There are multiple versions: Here are two, including the evaluation criteria: https://championsforhealth.org/wp-cont​ent/uploads/2018/12/MOCA-8.1.8.2-Engli​sh.pdf. (PDF)

Presumably a clinician buys a subscription to it and there's a standardized subset of puzzles/words/animals/3D figures that get generated every few months in order to prevent long term patients from memorizing the answers.

The arithmetic skill of counting backwards by 7 is preserved, (because prime numbers are weird and there's relatively little everyday use for having to subtract by 7), but the starting point (100, 70, etc) can be changed from test to test without affecting the validity of the results. I'd speculate they all start at multiples of 10 because it's arguably "easier" to subtract 7 from, say, 77 than it is from 70.


Don't Tread On Me.  GOP.  Approval ratings.
 
2020-07-21 6:59:15 PM  

Twilight Farkle: flondrix: Is this the sheet given the evaluator, as opposed to the subject? Is it possible to get "clean" versions of both the subject and evaluator versions?

I would totally blow the delayed recall.

[Fark user image 365x512][Fark user image 350x458]
[Fark user image 650x240]

There are multiple versions: Here are two, including the evaluation criteria: https://championsforhealth.org/wp-cont​ent/uploads/2018/12/MOCA-8.1.8.2-Engli​sh.pdf. (PDF)

Presumably a clinician buys a subscription to it and there's a standardized subset of puzzles/words/animals/3D figures that get generated every few months in order to prevent long term patients from memorizing the answers.

The arithmetic skill of counting backwards by 7 is preserved, (because prime numbers are weird and there's relatively little everyday use for having to subtract by 7), but the starting point (100, 70, etc) can be changed from test to test without affecting the validity of the results. I'd speculate they all start at multiples of 10 because it's arguably "easier" to subtract 7 from, say, 77 than it is from 70.


Thank you, although I still don't get it--the list of words (FACE, VELVET, CHURCH, etc) appears on the sheet given in the PDF, as does the series of numbers counting back from 100, so you can't give the subject that version of the sheet, yet you would have to give them some sort of pre-printed sheet to have the pictures of the animals, the cube to copy, the path to complete, etc.  I mean, I could copy-and-paste together a worksheet for the subject that didn't give away the answers, I just wondered if there was an officially sanctioned one.
 
2020-07-21 8:47:19 PM  

flondrix: Thank you, although I still don't get it--the list of words (FACE, VELVET, CHURCH, etc) appears on the sheet given in the PDF, as does the series of numbers counting back from 100, so you can't give the subject that version of the sheet, yet you would have to give them some sort of pre-printed sheet to have the pictures of the animals, the cube to copy, the path to complete, etc. I mean, I could copy-and-paste together a worksheet for the subject that didn't give away the answers, I just wondered if there was an officially sanctioned one.


I'm going to guess that the clinician prints out the PDF and cuts it at the animals line. (Or folds it over something opaque, like a clipboard.)

Everything above the animals has big spaces for the patient to draw in. That's the last time the patient has to actually interact with the paper.

Everything below the animals has tiny spaces for the testgiver to write in/check off. Testgiver reads the bottom half of the paper to the patient, and observes/scores/grades the response.
 
2020-07-21 9:18:43 PM  

flondrix: Twilight Farkle: [i.imgur.com image 772x964]

Is this the sheet given the evaluator, as opposed to the subject?  Is it possible to get "clean" versions of both the subject and evaluator versions?

I would totally blow the delayed recall.



That part depends on if I know I'm going to have to remember it.

If I don't know, then my brain has zero reason to keep a sequence of words in it for any length of time.  It'd be like remembering the two-factor authentication code I used to log in to my bank account this morning.

But if I know, I can create a quick mnemonic device that will last for at least five minutes.

Someone else in the thread posted an image with the words "hand," "nylon," "park," "carrot," and "yellow."  Just imagining a hand inside some pantyhose and then an image of a park with yellow carrots growing in it makes it easy.
 
2020-07-21 10:12:22 PM  

NetOwl: Someone else in the thread posted an image with the words "hand," "nylon," "park," "carrot," and "yellow." Just imagining a hand inside some pantyhose and then an image of a park with yellow carrots growing in it makes it easy.


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It's actually covered in the PDF upthread.

"Administration: The examiner reads a list of five words at a rate of one per second,
giving the following instructions: "This is a memory test. I am going to read a list of
words that you will have to remember now and later on. Listen carefully. When I am
through, tell me as many words as you can remember. It doesn't matter in what order you
say them."
The examiner marks a check in the allocated space for each word the subject
produces on this first trial. The examiner may not correct the subject if (s)he recalls a
deformed word or a word that sounds like the target word. When the subject indicates
that (s)he has finished (has recalled all words), or can recall no more words, the examiner
reads the list a second time with the following instructions: "I am going to read the same
list for a second time. Try to remember and tell me as many words as you can, including
words you said the first time."
The examiner puts a check in the allocated space for each
word the subject recalls on the second trial. At the end of the second trial, the examiner
informs the subject that (s)he will be asked to recall these words again by saying: "I will
ask you to recall those words again at the end of the test."

Scoring: No points are given for Trials One and Two"

And at the end of the test:
Administration: The examiner gives the following instructions: "I read some words to
you earlier, which I asked you to remember. Tell me as many of those words as you can
remember."
The examiner makes a check mark (√) for each of the words correctly
recalled spontaneously without any cues, in the allocated space and is now a furry because everybody's furry for Judy Hopps. Whether you wear nylons or not, and where you park the hand with the more-orange-than-yellow carrot is your own business..
 
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