Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Mirror.co.uk)   Guy shows the 'correct' way to drain pasta (and he may have a point)   (mirror.co.uk) divider line
    More: Followup, Sieve, Colander, plenty of others, wrong way, alternative method, fierce debate, way sieves, original technique  
•       •       •

1604 clicks; posted to Food » on 16 Jul 2020 at 1:40 PM (2 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



40 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-07-16 1:40:12 PM  
Who in the hell makes only one serving of penne pasta at a time?
 
2020-07-16 1:43:44 PM  
I can only imagine how he hangs his toilet paper roll.
 
2020-07-16 1:49:00 PM  

Closed_Minded_Bastage: Who in the hell makes only one serving of penne pasta at a time?


Perhaps someone could try it with a 12 quart pot and a large strainer and film it.
 
2020-07-16 1:58:15 PM  
470,000 views doing the mundane?
I have mastered the mundane.
My TikTok empire begins today.
 
2020-07-16 1:59:10 PM  
My pasta strainer has a built in stand. I'm going to go out on a limb here and say I'm supposed to use it.

Here's my pasta tip.  Run cold water in the sink, not on the pasta, when straining. It reduces the strain on your plumbing.  Don't actually rinse your pasta.
 
2020-07-16 2:01:11 PM  
I've tried it both ways. Vastly prefer large strainer in the sink. You can put the large strainers into a large pot, but it gets unwieldy, quick.
 
2020-07-16 2:08:38 PM  
Or just get a colander like a normal person
 
2020-07-16 2:09:20 PM  
Well, he's not saving any pasta water either way. So he's just doing it wrong twice.
 
2020-07-16 2:09:52 PM  

Mercutio879: I've tried it both ways.


Does that mean you're colander fluid?
 
2020-07-16 2:12:55 PM  

bhcompy: Or just get a colander like a normal person


This.

Those fine-mesh sieves are for things like getting the seeds out of jam, or chunks of vegetable out of your stock.
 
2020-07-16 2:18:16 PM  

Wave Of Anal Fury: Mercutio879: I've tried it both ways.

Does that mean you're colander fluid?


Maybe bi-strainual.

When does a strainer become a colander?
 
2020-07-16 2:18:18 PM  

FrancoFile: bhcompy: Or just get a colander like a normal person

This.

Those fine-mesh sieves are for things like getting the seeds out of jam, or chunks of vegetable out of your stock.


The pasta also gums up the mesh if you exert any pressure on it and is a pain in the ass to get out
 
2020-07-16 2:19:21 PM  

phlegmjay: Well, he's not saving any pasta water either way. So he's just doing it wrong twice.


What is one meant to do with pasta water?

Also yeah this is dumb. First he's using a strainer and not a colander, so he's stupid there. Second, what f-ing difference does it make if you pour INTO the strainer or not?
 
2020-07-16 2:19:23 PM  

FrancoFile: bhcompy: Or just get a colander like a normal person

This.

Those fine-mesh sieves are for things like getting the seeds out of jam, or chunks of vegetable out of your stock.


Cheese cloth in the colander. Means one less thing in the cupboards, and is way better at cleaning up veggie stock.
 
2020-07-16 2:21:38 PM  

NateAsbestos: phlegmjay: Well, he's not saving any pasta water either way. So he's just doing it wrong twice.

What is one meant to do with pasta water?

Also yeah this is dumb. First he's using a strainer and not a colander, so he's stupid there. Second, what f-ing difference does it make if you pour INTO the strainer or not?


If you have pasta sauce, pasta water is about the only good way to thin it down if it's too thick. The starch in the water also helps the sauce stick to the pasta.

Probably not hugely useful to canned sauce, but if you ever try to make your own, it can really elevate it.
 
2020-07-16 2:23:28 PM  

Mercutio879: FrancoFile: bhcompy: Or just get a colander like a normal person

This.

Those fine-mesh sieves are for things like getting the seeds out of jam, or chunks of vegetable out of your stock.

Cheese cloth in the colander. Means one less thing in the cupboards, and is way better at cleaning up veggie stock.


I do a 2-step.  Once through the sieve to get out the big step, then back on the heat to reduce and clarify before running through cheesecloth.  I don't get all the way to consommé, but I get most of the cloudiness out.
 
2020-07-16 2:23:40 PM  

NateAsbestos: phlegmjay: Well, he's not saving any pasta water either way. So he's just doing it wrong twice.

What is one meant to do with pasta water?

Also yeah this is dumb. First he's using a strainer and not a colander, so he's stupid there. Second, what f-ing difference does it make if you pour INTO the strainer or not?


Add 1/4 to 1/2 cup pasta cooking water to sauce. Add pasta (which should be slightly undercooked) back in, and boil until pasta is done and sauce is glossy and perfectly married to the pasta.

Works with most pasta sauces except pesto and a few others.
 
2020-07-16 2:25:45 PM  

whidbey: I can only imagine how he hangs his toilet paper roll.


Doesn't matter. He just stands up and rubs his ass on it, then pulls it down and tears it off past the used portion.
 
2020-07-16 2:26:34 PM  
Guy demonstrates correct way to use incorrect tool for the job at hand.
 
2020-07-16 2:26:48 PM  

NateAsbestos: phlegmjay: Well, he's not saving any pasta water either way. So he's just doing it wrong twice.

What is one meant to do with pasta water?

Also yeah this is dumb. First he's using a strainer and not a colander, so he's stupid there. Second, what f-ing difference does it make if you pour INTO the strainer or not?


https://www.seriouseats.com/2014/05/d​o​es-pasta-water-really-make-difference.​html
 
2020-07-16 2:29:20 PM  

FrancoFile: Mercutio879: FrancoFile: bhcompy: Or just get a colander like a normal person

This.

Those fine-mesh sieves are for things like getting the seeds out of jam, or chunks of vegetable out of your stock.

Cheese cloth in the colander. Means one less thing in the cupboards, and is way better at cleaning up veggie stock.

I do a 2-step.  Once through the sieve to get out the big step, then back on the heat to reduce and clarify before running through cheesecloth.  I don't get all the way to consommé, but I get most of the cloudiness out.


Never tried the reduce and clarify, but I'm not the pickiest when it comes to my soup. Does it make a difference to the taste?
 
2020-07-16 2:32:06 PM  

Mercutio879: FrancoFile: Mercutio879: FrancoFile: bhcompy: Or just get a colander like a normal person

This.

Those fine-mesh sieves are for things like getting the seeds out of jam, or chunks of vegetable out of your stock.

Cheese cloth in the colander. Means one less thing in the cupboards, and is way better at cleaning up veggie stock.

I do a 2-step.  Once through the sieve to get out the big step, then back on the heat to reduce and clarify before running through cheesecloth.  I don't get all the way to consommé, but I get most of the cloudiness out.

Never tried the reduce and clarify, but I'm not the pickiest when it comes to my soup. Does it make a difference to the taste?


I mostly use it for risotto, and yes.  I make gallons of turkey stock after thanksgiving, which can be kind of metallic tasting in risotto.  Clarifying it does a lot.  (Reducing is just to save room in the freezer)
 
2020-07-16 2:34:22 PM  

FrancoFile: Mercutio879: FrancoFile: Mercutio879: FrancoFile: bhcompy: Or just get a colander like a normal person

This.

Those fine-mesh sieves are for things like getting the seeds out of jam, or chunks of vegetable out of your stock.

Cheese cloth in the colander. Means one less thing in the cupboards, and is way better at cleaning up veggie stock.

I do a 2-step.  Once through the sieve to get out the big step, then back on the heat to reduce and clarify before running through cheesecloth.  I don't get all the way to consommé, but I get most of the cloudiness out.

Never tried the reduce and clarify, but I'm not the pickiest when it comes to my soup. Does it make a difference to the taste?

I mostly use it for risotto, and yes.  I make gallons of turkey stock after thanksgiving, which can be kind of metallic tasting in risotto.  Clarifying it does a lot.  (Reducing is just to save room in the freezer)


That would make sense for risotto. I need to try making risotto at some point. I was just thinking about my Instant Pot Chicken Noodle Soup (which is really damn good, if I say so myself).
 
2020-07-16 2:40:27 PM  
Yeah, well, he can do things his way and be happy and I can do things the right way and be happier. I also use the correct tool for the job where he doesn't, I use a colander, not a mesh strainer.

I'm all for little life hacks, like using the plastic bread clips on a cord to identify what each cord goes to:
Fark user imageView Full Size


This makes scrambling underneath the desk to unplug a specific cord much easier.

Some things are a revelation, this bass akwards 'life hack' isn't.
 
2020-07-16 3:11:30 PM  
Yeah, no. He's wrong on several counts, and I'm not going to spend a shiatload of time explaining how most wire sieves are fastened to their hoops, or that they're not designed to handle load on the domed side, or that a colander does the job better, or that the second boiling water hits your hands because you've stupidly discovered that water runs down you're gonna drop the sieve and pan, or that you can just put a colander in the sink, turn on the cold water (but not rinse the pasta with it) to keep the steam down and dump the contents into the colander with far less risk & more control.

This is the new "engineered controversy" bullshiat article? Really?! Fark that noise.
 
2020-07-16 3:39:55 PM  
Can we talk about how small that pot was for that amount of pasta?
 
2020-07-16 3:42:45 PM  
Let's see; I'm cooking something in boiling water that sticks like wallpaper glue - how can I increase my chances of a disaster and risk severe burns for no reason?

Ah ha!
 
2020-07-16 4:18:14 PM  

question_dj: Can we talk about how small that pot was for that amount of pasta?


Yeah, that too.  Look at how much pasta is stuck to the pot.

Leave it the Brits to screw up food that's supposed to be boiled.
 
2020-07-16 4:27:31 PM  
Great advice!  I hope this guy has a video on Kwanzaa cake too.

/ endsarcasm... pasta water is GOLD.
// https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=we​2iWT​Jqo98
 
2020-07-16 5:18:42 PM  

Wave Of Anal Fury: Mercutio879: I've tried it both ways.

Does that mean you're colander fluid?


Is colander fluid just a fancy way to say pasta water?
 
2020-07-16 6:03:09 PM  

big pig peaches: Wave Of Anal Fury: Mercutio879: I've tried it both ways.

Does that mean you're colander fluid?

Is colander fluid just a fancy way to say pasta water?


No, colander fluid goes inside the colander to keep it cool when you pour boiling water through it.  You need to change it every 5,000 miles or so.
 
2020-07-16 6:33:54 PM  
So stupid.  And it only works IF YOU HAVE A SMALL ENOUGH PAN.

People preparing a LARGE pot of pasta aren't likely to be able to hold and flip several quarts of boiling water.

I avoid this altogether by having pots with built in strainer lid design, like this:
Fark user imageView Full Size
.
 
2020-07-16 6:58:13 PM  
I guess I never realized that people hate colanders.
 
2020-07-16 8:31:28 PM  

muwaryer: I guess I never realized that people hate colanders.


Strainists man... farkin' strainists.
 
2020-07-16 9:00:00 PM  
Jeez and I just used a combo of colander stockpot .
 
2020-07-16 9:28:29 PM  
Don't waste that pasta water.  Just drink it!

oyster.ignimgs.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-16 10:19:27 PM  
Yea...but no thanks. As has already been eloquently stated, using a colander in the sink is a better method. If you need some pasta water, dunk a measuring cup in before you strain. The main reason I prefer the colander is it allows me to shake the water from hollow pastas so you don't accidentally thin your sauce. If I was making 1-2 servings I ~might~ see the point, but I generally cook the whole box at a time.
 
2020-07-17 2:43:49 AM  

Joe USer: My pasta strainer has a built in stand. I'm going to go out on a limb here and say I'm supposed to use it.

Here's my pasta tip.  Run cold water in the sink, not on the pasta, when straining. It reduces the strain on your plumbing.  Don't actually rinse your pasta.


I'm usually lazy enough that I've still got a used pan on the stove from breakfast, so I just strain my pasta water into that.

I've also tried straining it over the sink onto the divider between the two chambers, so it cools down a bit before going down the drain. Haven't had any plumbing issues so far.
 
2020-07-17 8:25:34 AM  

Farkin Charlie: If I was making 1-2 servings I ~might~ see the point, but I generally cook the whole box at a time.


So...one or two servings...
 
2020-07-17 9:29:19 PM  
I tried this a while back.

The boiling water ran allong the side of the strainer handle and burnt my farking hand.

Straining pasta wasnt exactly complicated or hard to do before. It doesnt need to be hacked.
 
Displayed 40 of 40 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.