Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Guardian)   "Ten years from graduating, I'm still not sure university was a good decision. Was university anything more than an expensive blip?" You have three chances to guess the author's major   (theguardian.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Academic degree, Higher education, University, Last month, Naked mole rat, middle-ranking university, good friends, slow reader  
•       •       •

364 clicks; posted to Discussion » on 16 Jul 2020 at 8:20 AM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



22 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-07-16 8:30:36 AM  
I utilize my degree daily and have no regrets about college. I do not feel attacked by this content.
 
2020-07-16 8:38:05 AM  
My guess.  English or women's study
Gender: Female.

Check, Check.  My next guess is that she'll finally quit only when she can't get any more "free" money (parents, loans, etc.), then will fast track to getting her mRs degree, work for a year at a nothing job, then realize that all she really ever wanted was a family and once they have a kid she really should stay home for the first 30-60 years of the baby's life.
 
2020-07-16 9:08:24 AM  
A degree isn't a guarantee of anything, it just gives you options. The rest is up to you. If you're unwilling to read "hard books" or otherwise do the work to be a success, don't be surprised if success passes you by.
 
2020-07-16 9:11:27 AM  
In a sense, this physical copy of my 2:1 in English literature from a middle-ranking university is the most expensive thing I own.
... ... ...
When it came to choosing my degree, I simply went with the subject I'd always done best in at school.
... ... ...
I've always been a painfully slow reader.


I believe I have discovered the problem.
 
2020-07-16 9:13:54 AM  

tom baker's scarf: My next guess is that she'll finally quit only when she can't get any more "free" money (parents, loans, etc.), then will fast track to getting her mRs degree, work for a year at a nothing job, then realize that all she really ever wanted was a family and once they have a kid she really should stay home for the first 30-60 years of the baby's life.


Are you suggesting that promoting a society where everyone is expected to be an interchangeable corporate or bureaucratic cog, irrespective of their own wants and desires, can be just as harmful as a society that delineates and breaks everyone down by their broadest characteristics?

I damn sure hope you are, because if you did, then my post would be based in reality.
 
2020-07-16 9:16:09 AM  
John Mulaney's version is a lot funnier.

John Mulaney Got Cheated Out of $120K | Netflix Is A Joke
Youtube aiqKK4ysI7g
 
2020-07-16 9:29:21 AM  

The English Major: I utilize my degree daily and have no regrets about college. I do not feel attacked by this content.


But the Grammarly app probably pisses you off, right? "I spent all this money on an education so I could speak and write correctly, and now some stupid app does all the legwork for the kids!" ;)


I went to university as a mature student, and I surprised how much sniffing their own farts was in academia. I attended both some STEM and arts classes, and the difference between the professors was striking. I took some business courses too, they all slotted into program requirements, and I admit to taking a couple courses just for fun. STEM profs were utterly pragmatic about why people go to university and get degrees. Over on the arts side, there was a lot of whinging about education for the sake of being a better or more rounded person, knowledge is power, and so on and so forth. Smelling their own farts.

I actually do enjoy learning for the sake of it. If I made my bones and had an early retirement, I'd probably spend the bulk of my days drifting around the university and taking courses, just 'cause I could afford to. But the pragmatic side for young people taking on massive debt loads to go to university is not presented in a format that realistically allows students to make accurate risk/reward assessments about their financial future.
 
2020-07-16 9:39:42 AM  

Fear the Clam: A degree isn't a guarantee of anything, it just gives you options. The rest is up to you. If you're unwilling to read "hard books" or otherwise do the work to be a success, don't be surprised if success passes you by.


Yeah. When I got to that part, it came together why she struggled for the years after graduating.
I have an English Degree and like any degree, you have to put in the time and effort to get a job with. I do consider myself lucky I get to use my degree outside academics, but I also was persistent over a a course of a year to find and land my job.

Of course, the most important lesson I took from my degree was that persistence is the one thing all successful people have.

"Nothing in this world can take the place of persistence. Talent will not; nothing is more common than unsuccessful men with talent. Genius will not; unrewarded genius is almost a proverb. Education will not; the world is full of educated derelicts. Persistence and determination alone are omnipotent. The slogan Press On! has solved and always will solve the problems of the human race."

― Calvin Coolidge
 
2020-07-16 10:17:40 AM  
I used to be kidded about my English major, especially by engineers and IT people. Now they work for me.
 
2020-07-16 10:22:14 AM  

tom baker's scarf: My guess.  English or women's study
Gender: Female.

Check, Check.  My next guess is that she'll finally quit only when she can't get any more "free" money (parents, loans, etc.), then will fast track to getting her mRs degree, work for a year at a nothing job, then realize that all she really ever wanted was a family and once they have a kid she really should stay home for the first 30-60 years of the baby's life.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-16 10:45:08 AM  
I've got three degrees, never used any of them directly, but they checked the squares. It really wasn't needed for what I've done work-wise. But I received a real education.

I see less need for a degree now than ever, especially in Murica, where being smart is bad.
 
2020-07-16 10:53:47 AM  
a disused strap-on?
 
2020-07-16 10:57:44 AM  

The English Major: I utilize my degree daily and have no regrets about college. I do not feel attacked by this content.


User name doesn't check out.

Or maybe it does. Utilise means 'to make use of', that is to use something for something other than its intended purpose. If you are using your English degree vocationally, or it has helped you to communicate in English then you are using it.

If your English degree got you a job flipping burgers then yes, you utilise it daily.
 
2020-07-16 11:05:56 AM  

glompoc: a disused strap-on?


Yep, the most interesting part was quickly glossed over.
 
2020-07-16 11:35:01 AM  

Mike_LowELL: tom baker's scarf: My next guess is that she'll finally quit only when she can't get any more "free" money (parents, loans, etc.), then will fast track to getting her mRs degree, work for a year at a nothing job, then realize that all she really ever wanted was a family and once they have a kid she really should stay home for the first 30-60 years of the baby's life.

Are you suggesting that promoting a society where everyone is expected to be an interchangeable corporate or bureaucratic cog, irrespective of their own wants and desires, can be just as harmful as a society that delineates and breaks everyone down by their broadest characteristics?

I damn sure hope you are, because if you did, then my post would be based in reality.


nope. but if you spend a decade spending a ton of money and by your own admission, accomplish nothing betting that trend will continue is about as close to a sure thing as you're likely to get.  It's not like the path i outline doesn't happen, you know, constantly.

I'm not anti-woman or anti-mother or even anti-English major. I am against being a self-indulgent and lazy child in an adult's body and then be completely mystified as to why life just isn't working out like that episodic documentary (Friends) you spent all that time watching in preparation for adult life.
 
2020-07-16 11:44:21 AM  

starsrift: The English Major: I utilize my degree daily and have no regrets about college. I do not feel attacked by this content.

But the Grammarly app probably pisses you off, right? "I spent all this money on an education so I could speak and write correctly, and now some stupid app does all the legwork for the kids!" ;)


I went to university as a mature student, and I surprised how much sniffing their own farts was in academia. I attended both some STEM and arts classes, and the difference between the professors was striking. I took some business courses too, they all slotted into program requirements, and I admit to taking a couple courses just for fun. STEM profs were utterly pragmatic about why people go to university and get degrees. Over on the arts side, there was a lot of whinging about education for the sake of being a better or more rounded person, knowledge is power, and so on and so forth. Smelling their own farts.

I actually do enjoy learning for the sake of it. If I made my bones and had an early retirement, I'd probably spend the bulk of my days drifting around the university and taking courses, just 'cause I could afford to. But the pragmatic side for young people taking on massive debt loads to go to university is not presented in a format that realistically allows students to make accurate risk/reward assessments about their financial future.


the thing most lib arts majors fail to recognize it that most of the stuff they study was created by people who were already rich, completely financially supported by someone else or lived a life of poverty.  If you need to you know, make an actually living and want to eat everyday then Greek myths and comparative philosophy are not what you need to be focusing on.  You can spend your college years learning marketable skills and then, in your free time or PTO read Kant.  that way you get to sleep indoors, feed your kids and become a well rounded person.
 
2020-07-16 12:15:36 PM  

Fear the Clam: A degree isn't a guarantee of anything, it just gives you options. The rest is up to you. If you're unwilling to read "hard books" or otherwise do the work to be a success, don't be surprised if success passes you by.


An English major, and she apparently thinks A Tale of Two Cities is a "hard" book.
 
2020-07-16 12:29:51 PM  
tom baker's scarf: the thing most lib arts majors fail to recognize it that most of the stuff they study was created by people who were already rich, completely financially supported by someone else or lived a life of poverty.  If you need to you know, make an actually living and want to eat everyday then Greek myths and comparative philosophy are not what you need to be focusing on.  You can spend your college years learning marketable skills and then, in your free time or PTO read Kant.  that way you get to sleep indoors, feed your kids and become a well rounded person.

Exactly. And - at least in my experience - those arts degrees are initially presented as just as valid and financially viable as the STEM or MBA to teens and early twenty-somethings who are typically too naive to know different.
 
2020-07-16 1:27:11 PM  

cob2f: I used to be kidded about my English major, especially by engineers and IT people. Now they work for me.


I'm ... not sure that's something to brag about in this fashion.
 
2020-07-16 1:34:14 PM  

starsrift: tom baker's scarf: the thing most lib arts majors fail to recognize it that most of the stuff they study was created by people who were already rich, completely financially supported by someone else or lived a life of poverty.  If you need to you know, make an actually living and want to eat everyday then Greek myths and comparative philosophy are not what you need to be focusing on.  You can spend your college years learning marketable skills and then, in your free time or PTO read Kant.  that way you get to sleep indoors, feed your kids and become a well rounded person.

Exactly. And - at least in my experience - those arts degrees are initially presented as just as valid and financially viable as the STEM or MBA to teens and early twenty-somethings who are typically too naive to know different.


As a Freshman Engineering student (not where I ended up but c'est la vie), my elective (because as an engineering student you are *lucky* to get one elective a year) was an Anthropology class that was titled something like "Organization of Human Civilization in the Context of Modern Cities".  I was pumped because I was in a city university and I grew up in the 'burbs and I figured this would let me use my walks around the city as a sort of personal lab to think about the topics of the course.

I dropped it on the first day when the professor explained that the text book was a book that he wrote and then gave his first lecture about how god damned well traveled he was.

*INCREDIBLY* my textbook for statics was also written by the professor for that class and instead of seeing that as abject bullshiat, I saw it as an incredible boon.

I assumed for years after that this was a mistake brought on by my own personal biases, but I grow increasingly confident that my instincts were correct in both cases and choose to search instead for a first principle that allows for me to hold both of these seemingly contradictory opinions.

I think this additional observation of yours might be an important part of constructing that first principle.
 
2020-07-16 6:27:31 PM  

The English Major: I utilize my degree daily and have no regrets about college. I do not feel attacked by this content.


I don't even though I am in the same general field. The half life of information irrelevance is a thing with degrees. I was smart and coddled a bit. University was a shock. No free passes, you want help, seek it out. Ask. Seek different approaches. It was up to me in a way nothing ever was before.

What I DID learn, and still use to this day is the lesson of: "figure stuff out on your own"  and just a structure about thinking about problems that assumed I would simply have to make myself take own my education by prying it from their brains.

Sometimes theories, equations, hard learning of facts is important. In my case, the business world is full of "sort of" facts and guesswork about the future. Regression analysis is easy, projecting the other way not so much. The flexibility to think critically and get information is always relevant. I don't remember the calculation for bond yields, or gdp or stuff like that. I know how to find it if needed. I know how to fill in the "gaps" in what I know by being flexible and open to discovering someone else does it better.

4 years we'll spent.
 
2020-07-16 9:03:30 PM  
She said every job she has had has required a degree, so it wasn't totally a waste. I have to say, though, she doesn't really seem to have been suited to studying English literature: a self-described really slow reader who doesn't like hard books.
 
Displayed 22 of 22 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.