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(Some Horror Guy)   Showing your kids horror films is a good idea. Yeah, that's what 5-year-old subby's parents thought when they took him to the drive-in to see "Jaws" in '75 and that chewed-up Kintner boy's bloody yellow raft washed up on the beach and I need a hug   (crimereads.com) divider line
    More: Creepy, The Blair Witch Project, Horror film, The Texas Chain Saw Massacre, horror-fan parents, Reign of Terror, Horror fiction, horror fiend, little things  
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674 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 15 Jul 2020 at 2:23 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-15 12:37:19 PM  
I was 6 when my parents took us to the Drive-in when Deliverance was playing, and 8 or 9 when we saw Death Wish at the same theater and then Last House on the Left was reissued and I saw it with my dad when I was around 12

So I feel your pain
 
2020-07-15 12:47:50 PM  
Anybody else miss the smell of vhs tapes in brown cases? I would work all week so I could pick one horror movie on Saturday. I miss that experience so much.
 
2020-07-15 1:37:21 PM  
My mom tells a story about when she stopped being careful about what I watched: I was 3, and she came to get me from my best friend's house. We were sitting in the living room, watching Texas Chainsaw Massacre and reading her dad's Playboys.
(I don't really know how careful she was before that, because according to my grandmother, I loved the scene in Cat People where the guy got his arm ripped off by a leopard. I don't even remember that movie. I do remember the above story, though.)
 
2020-07-15 2:04:08 PM  
When I was little, my teenage older sisters took me with them to see a movie. The Haunting, Shirley Jackson's best story, black and white, incredibly farking scary movie. Not a drop of blood in the whole thing, and it changed my life. Take your kids to horror movies, they'll be better for it.
 
2020-07-15 2:24:46 PM  
Yeah, I was six when my parents brought me to the drive-in where The Exorcist was playing (they thought I'd fall asleep).  For the longest time, I thought that was a priest's primary job.
 
2020-07-15 2:25:27 PM  
Just don't let you kids see a tit.  That will scar them for life.
 
2020-07-15 2:31:27 PM  
Ok, everybody who was really young when they saw Salem's Lot on TV, raise your trembling hand.
 
2020-07-15 2:32:46 PM  
I was 7.  And still swam in the ocean all summer, every summer.

Also my dad was a scuba diver.
 
2020-07-15 2:35:36 PM  
Subby, are you me?  I was born in 72 and the first film I remember seeing is Jaws.  To this day I give my dad shiat for taking a five year old to see that.  I distinctly remember being afraid to go into the basement of our house because in my young mind it made sense that there would be a shark down there.

//Did you get the Star Wars early bird "toy" as well?
///I did
 
2020-07-15 2:35:57 PM  
Saw 'Don't go into the House' https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0080646/​ at a Drive-In when I was 7. Still remember the farked up movie and that's the only time I saw it.
 
2020-07-15 2:37:11 PM  

Atomic Jonb: Ok, everybody who was really young when they saw Salem's Lot on TV, raise your trembling hand.


I didn't see it on TV, I convinced my grandma to rent it for me on VHS when I was staying with her for a weekend, when I was around 7 or so.  Still one of my favorites.

My youngest daughter and I like to watch cheesy old horror movies together.  It's hard for me to find new horror movies I like.
 
2020-07-15 2:41:05 PM  
hahaha just like subby I was 7 when my mom took me to the drive in to see jaws.  it honestly took YEARS to get me to go swimming in a lake or anything else other than a swimming pool.

I think the double feature for that was also 'squirm' about man eating worms.

not a lot of good sleep for a while.
 
2020-07-15 2:42:11 PM  
The early Disney films were a hell of a lot more terrifying to me as a child. Seriously, there is some real nightmare fuel in those 'classics'.
 
2020-07-15 2:42:48 PM  
I still resent my parents not letting us see Jurassic Parkat ages 8 and 7.
 
2020-07-15 2:44:51 PM  
Ghost Story, Circle of Fear, even Killdozer.
Whinnie the Pooh's Blustery Day
 
2020-07-15 2:45:13 PM  

Subtonic: The early Disney films were a hell of a lot more terrifying to me as a child. Seriously, there is some real nightmare fuel in those 'classics'.


I wrote a college term paper on the negative impact of some Disney films (Aladdin and The Lion King IIRC) on younger children.  It was bullshiat, but sound from a research perspective.
 
2020-07-15 2:46:33 PM  
And then my parents though it would be a good idea to take me and my sister with them and some of their friends to see Dressed to Kill at the drive in when I was about 6.  I don't exactly remember the second feature, but I'm sure it was just as good of a decision.
 
2020-07-15 2:46:57 PM  
I was 5. Watched Terminator and Poltergeist back to back on satellite. My parents knew.

Way cooler story bro: I was about 11 and my friend's dad was a film industry exporter and he had a whole section of porn on the third floor of his house. I still remember a couple of titles that I've never seen since.
 
2020-07-15 2:47:01 PM  

mjbok: Subtonic: The early Disney films were a hell of a lot more terrifying to me as a child. Seriously, there is some real nightmare fuel in those 'classics'.

I wrote a college term paper on the negative impact of some Disney films (Aladdin and The Lion King IIRC) on younger children.  It was bullshiat, but sound from a research perspective.


Pinocchio and Dumbo were worse. By a lot.
 
2020-07-15 2:50:21 PM  

Subtonic: mjbok: Subtonic: The early Disney films were a hell of a lot more terrifying to me as a child. Seriously, there is some real nightmare fuel in those 'classics'.

I wrote a college term paper on the negative impact of some Disney films (Aladdin and The Lion King IIRC) on younger children.  It was bullshiat, but sound from a research perspective.

Pinocchio and Dumbo were worse. By a lot.


I know that Aladdin was picked (by me) because I had it available to watch.  It was surprisingly easy to map scenes to "psychologically damaging imagery" from a psych text book.  The appearance, content, and disappearance of the cave of wonders was all rife with things that the book said would fark kids up*.

*in technical terms.
 
2020-07-15 2:55:19 PM  

mjbok: Subtonic: mjbok: Subtonic: The early Disney films were a hell of a lot more terrifying to me as a child. Seriously, there is some real nightmare fuel in those 'classics'.

I wrote a college term paper on the negative impact of some Disney films (Aladdin and The Lion King IIRC) on younger children.  It was bullshiat, but sound from a research perspective.

Pinocchio and Dumbo were worse. By a lot.

I know that Aladdin was picked (by me) because I had it available to watch.  It was surprisingly easy to map scenes to "psychologically damaging imagery" from a psych text book.  The appearance, content, and disappearance of the cave of wonders was all rife with things that the book said would fark kids up*.

*in technical terms.


I admire your commitment to the art of bullshiating.
 
2020-07-15 3:00:22 PM  
Watched the first 1/2 of Alien, alone, on HBO at about 5 years old.

I finally stopped having the be killed multiple times in the dream by the alien when i was about 26.

The 90's darkhorse comics helped a lot, going from a very real look to a cartoon look changed how it felt in my mind's eye, seemed to ease the frequency of the nightmares.


but i still basiaclly do not like dreaming to this day. and i do not generally get in for most horror /create feature flicks. A frightnight/lost boys/critters kind of comedy horror not withstanding.
 
2020-07-15 3:00:59 PM  

Subtonic: I admire your commitment to the art of bullshiating.


Paper requirement:  Show examples of a mainstream children's film that has material that is damaging to a child.  Requirement:  Cite specific instances and how they can be damaging based on blah, blah, blah.

Writing a compelling argument that you don't believe in can be easier, because you know the reasoning of the other side.

Example:  In Argumentation and Debate you had to participate in two debates on the same issue.  Once on the pro, once on the con.  My topic was record labelling/censorship.  I am against both (mostly just censorship, but labelling to a lesser degree).  After both debates you had to write a legal brief for one side or the other.  Arguing for censorship was much, much easier, because of the ton of "evidence" Tipper Gore had produced about the benefits of censorship.
 
2020-07-15 3:04:46 PM  

Subtonic: The early Disney films were a hell of a lot more terrifying to me as a child. Seriously, there is some real nightmare fuel in those 'classics'.


Fark user imageView Full Size


What the fark, Disney?
 
2020-07-15 3:08:57 PM  
I saw Dr. Otto and the Riddle of the Gloom Beam at a young impressionable age, and I still sometimes have that nightmare where I'm watching it again.

It frightens people when I wake up screaming, but it's actually a huge relief.
 
2020-07-15 3:15:25 PM  
DNRTFA. I'm a horror fanatic. I have a 3000+ title Blu-ray collection and about half of that is horror. I'm surrounded by props and horror paraphernalia. There was no way my kiddo was going to avoid it. My 5 year old daughter just watched Jaws for the first time (she was rooting for the shark and was extremely bummed that it was blown up) and she's pumped for the next three (I've advised her to manage expectations). One of her favorite movies right now is Killer Klowns from Outer Space. We all had that monster that we were fascinated with above all others, hers is Chucky. She thinks he's cute, frightening and funny, all in one. She sits for long stretches at a time examining and reexamining all of the box art in our horror section, planning what she's going to watch first as soon as she's allowed (just like I did on my weekly trips to Video King). She has her own Freddy glove, mine from when I was a kid. The theme from Halloween is among her favorite bits of going-to-sleep music, between Frozen II and the My Little Pony movie soundtrack. I've seen her fear be on the same level as other kids, but I've seen her bravery, compassion, reason and empathy consistently surpass her peers and even those much, much older that are supposed to have a better understanding and control of those qualities. I'm not worried.
 
2020-07-15 3:16:31 PM  

PvtStash: Watched the first 1/2 of Alien, alone, on HBO at about 5 years old.

I finally stopped having the be killed multiple times in the dream by the alien when i was about 26.

The 90's darkhorse comics helped a lot, going from a very real look to a cartoon look changed how it felt in my mind's eye, seemed to ease the frequency of the nightmares.


but i still basiaclly do not like dreaming to this day. and i do not generally get in for most horror /create feature flicks. A frightnight/lost boys/critters kind of comedy horror not withstanding.


I saw Alien in the theater when I was 12. The visceral horror affected me somewhat; I remember feeling like there was a chestbuster inside of me for a while. But the biggest impact on me was the stunning discovery that a woman could be the hero. I has absolutely no idea that was possible at the time. It was one of the most formative movie experiences I ever had.
 
2020-07-15 3:17:33 PM  
has = had
 
2020-07-15 3:17:50 PM  

mjbok: Subby, are you me?  I was born in 72 and the first film I remember seeing is Jaws.  To this day I give my dad shiat for taking a five year old to see that.  I distinctly remember being afraid to go into the basement of our house because in my young mind it made sense that there would be a shark down there.

//Did you get the Star Wars early bird "toy" as well?
///I did


No Star Wars coupon, but I did have the board game.
 
2020-07-15 3:24:36 PM  

wiredroach: mjbok: Subby, are you me?  I was born in 72 and the first film I remember seeing is Jaws.  To this day I give my dad shiat for taking a five year old to see that.  I distinctly remember being afraid to go into the basement of our house because in my young mind it made sense that there would be a shark down there.

//Did you get the Star Wars early bird "toy" as well?
///I did

No Star Wars coupon, but I did have the board game.


Death Star Escape?  Had that as well.
 
2020-07-15 3:28:58 PM  

mjbok: wiredroach: mjbok: Subby, are you me?  I was born in 72 and the first film I remember seeing is Jaws.  To this day I give my dad shiat for taking a five year old to see that.  I distinctly remember being afraid to go into the basement of our house because in my young mind it made sense that there would be a shark down there.

//Did you get the Star Wars early bird "toy" as well?
///I did

No Star Wars coupon, but I did have the board game.

Death Star Escape?  Had that as well.


Yes. Great game.
 
2020-07-15 3:32:59 PM  
I was talking on the phone with my brother last night about the old Yarmouth Drive-In opening up after 30+ years.
MOM wouldn't let me see Jaws. I stayed over at a friend's house that was behind the drive-in. Locals could get in for $.50 and had a big speaker.
Brother is 67, still hasn't seen Jaws. Refuses to. @ Motel Hell on the Beach I had a Jaws-Fest every 4th of July. MADE my MOM (God rest her soul) watch Jaws, she thought is was OK and couldn't explain why I wasn't allowed to see it when I was 10.
Not a 'horror' fan, my life is a horror show.
/I drink Narragansett
//I have a 'squishy' can I bring to the Dr's office for 'procedures.
///Looking for a 'squishy' bottle of Bourbon.
 
2020-07-15 3:39:02 PM  

someonelse: PvtStash: Watched the first 1/2 of Alien, alone, on HBO at about 5 years old.

I finally stopped having the be killed multiple times in the dream by the alien when i was about 26.

The 90's darkhorse comics helped a lot, going from a very real look to a cartoon look changed how it felt in my mind's eye, seemed to ease the frequency of the nightmares.


but i still basiaclly do not like dreaming to this day. and i do not generally get in for most horror /create feature flicks. A frightnight/lost boys/critters kind of comedy horror not withstanding.

I saw Alien in the theater when I was 12. The visceral horror affected me somewhat; I remember feeling like there was a chestbuster inside of me for a while. But the biggest impact on me was the stunning discovery that a woman could be the hero. I has absolutely no idea that was possible at the time. It was one of the most formative movie experiences I ever had.



Oh see i'm part of the whole, single mom, latch key child era.
That whole 'women's work" and "how to be a man" stuff never made it past the door to me, sense the day in day out observational indoctrination in my family/friends circle was just nothing to note of any real defined gender roles.
In one grandparents house they filled very traditional  roles and in the other it was not, and there was no fussing or fighting about it, each was just being what they wanted to be.
And even though pop media would have had a pattern of male gender roles, the immediate day in day out reality of my world, made it such that none of that was telling me what LIFE WAS, but just was what it was.So even though we see males in the role more often, there was no beat skipped for me when it was a female.That was, like all things on the bell curve, normal, just not as common to see n some circles.You got a nice story though i got to say, it is that age that we begin to set the cement on what we imagine reality is confined to being. And experiences that break our burgeoning norm expectations like that are really the best things to have at that age.
 
2020-07-15 3:39:47 PM  
The year was 1979. A 9-year-old Pimpsta's father announced he was "in the mood for a scary movie tonight" which was my bat signal to start begging him to let me go. Much to my mother's chagrin, my pleas for some quality dad/son time at the local 2-screen cineplex (the most cutting edge theater in our area) won my father over. And so, Pimpsta Sr took his oldest child to see The Amnityville Horror.

By the time the walls started bleeding, I was under my seat pissing myself. That movie scared the bejeezus outta me. I've never been more thankful for a movie to end than I was when the credits finally started rolling on that film. I remember my father looking down at me, and with a calmness that belied the horrors we had just seen on that giant screen, said the following: "That movie wasn't scary at all. I wanted to see a scary movie. Let's go see what's playing on the other side of the theater."

Reluctantly, I followed pops to the ticket counter wherein he bought two tickets for the second scary movie of the evening; a little-known flick with a simple title: Alien.

I didn't sleep in my bed for three months after that night and my mother never let my father take lil Pimpsta to the movies again. But, I'll never forget my dad laughing hysterically through the chestburster scene.
 
2020-07-15 3:42:17 PM  
My uncle took his step daughter to see Jaws in the theater. Then that night, went to her bed and started shaking it back and forth, terrorizing her. We were talking about it years ago thinking it was The Exorcist when she said it was Jaws.

My uncle pipes up "Did you think the shark was going to come out of your bed?"
 
2020-07-15 3:45:28 PM  
Omega Man & Legend of Boggy Creek seared my 7 year old brain. I'll have to remember to thank my parents for that double feature at the local drive-in.

/off cloud
 
2020-07-15 3:53:55 PM  
For me it was The Howling, which still stands up today.  The full frontal nudity was more traumatic than the violence.
 
2020-07-15 4:05:07 PM  
Zardoz at the drive-in when I was nine. Mom was hip like that.
 
2020-07-15 4:26:47 PM  

Atomic Jonb: Ok, everybody who was really young when they saw Salem's Lot on TV, raise your trembling hand.


For me it was that evil little doll from "Trilogy of Terror". A little farkin voodoo prick doll with a spear chases this lady around the house and she ends up somehow throwing in the oven, then breathing the smoke and becoming possessed by it. Fark the arsehole who made that move and fark him hard.
 
2020-07-15 4:36:38 PM  
DaWormyPimpsta :I went to see the remake of Amityville in the theater  and one couple had brought not only their infant, who cried intermittently at volume, but their toddler. I will never in all my life forget that after George kills the family dog- even though technically it isn't seen- the small, quavering voice crying out "Daddy, Daddy- no. What happened to the doggy?The doggy is okay, right?"You could feel the silence just ripple through the rest of the audience.
 
2020-07-15 4:56:54 PM  

You Are All Sheep: hahaha just like subby I was 7 when my mom took me to the drive in to see jaws.  it honestly took YEARS to get me to go swimming in a lake or anything else other than a swimming pool.

I think the double feature for that was also 'squirm' about man eating worms.

not a lot of good sleep for a while.


Ha, those are my two childhood movie theater traumas too!  Jaws when I was 6, Squirm when I was 7. The scene where the dude's decapitated head emerged from the hole in the boat gave me serious nightmares.
 
2020-07-15 5:08:31 PM  

ununcle: Atomic Jonb: Ok, everybody who was really young when they saw Salem's Lot on TV, raise your trembling hand.

For me it was that evil little doll from "Trilogy of Terror". A little farkin voodoo prick doll with a spear chases this lady around the house and she ends up somehow throwing in the oven, then breathing the smoke and becoming possessed by it. Fark the arsehole who made that move and fark him hard.


F*cking terrifying! I hated that thing. Cost me some sleep.
 
2020-07-15 5:09:07 PM  
A buddy's father took us as 8-year-olds to see "Alien" when it came out. Hey, we loved "Star Wars," so another space movie would be cool, too, right? None of us knew what to expect, including my buddy's dad.

But yeah, I was pretty farked up for weeks, to the point where my father really wanted to go have a "talk" with my buddy's dad who took us to see it. BIG mistake.

Today, my kids are largely immune to that stuff. I showed them Alien after talking about how badly it scared me (they're 11 and 14) and they just shrugged and criticized the effects. Me? I was farking traumatized by it.
 
Ant
2020-07-15 5:12:33 PM  
I don't know how, but I forgot all about the Kitner kid's death, and I showed Jaws to my son, saying something like "don't worry, Steven Spielberg doesn't kill kids in his movies," which, now that I think about it, is probably untrue for more than just Jaws.
 
2020-07-15 5:22:29 PM  
I think some kids can handle it. Some can't. I suspect that horror movies aren't the greatest thing to expose your children to, but I don't have strong opinions on it. It really comes down to a movie-by-movie or kid-by-kid decision.

What I do have strong opinions on are the Cool Edgy Dads who never miss an opportunity to preach about how tough and mature their young kids are for enduring Cool Edgy Dad's taste in movies... as if it is EVER actually about the kid and not just about what a Cool Edgy Dad that Cool Edgy Dad thinks he is. You aren't fooling anyone, Cool Edgy Dad.
 
2020-07-15 5:24:35 PM  

Ant: I don't know how, but I forgot all about the Kitner kid's death, and I showed Jaws to my son, saying something like "don't worry, Steven Spielberg doesn't kill kids in his movies," which, now that I think about it, is probably untrue for more than just Jaws.


I'm thinking, but the only other example I can recall of a child getting killed in a Spielberg movie is Rufio in Hook.
 
2020-07-15 5:27:40 PM  
I saw The Thing and The Car at the drive-in before I was 8, was reading Stephen King by 2nd grade.  Pretty much any horror movie or novel I could find. The only thing that left me scared for weeks to months after I saw it was The Day After.  In retrospect, they shouldn't have let me watch that one.  I was 9, and for months every time I heard a plane overhead I was afraid it wasn't a plane.   Had nuclear holocaust nightmares on a regular basis until I was 11 or 12.
 
2020-07-15 5:34:00 PM  
I was five when dad took me to The Shining. The woman in room 237 was the first nude adult woman I'd seen other than my mother. The entire film scared the fark out of me for quite a while.
 
2020-07-15 6:03:41 PM  
When I was four or five, my parents put me to bed, and then started to watch The Thing. Some time later, for whatever reason, I got up. I quietly walked down the hallway, and stood there watching the movie behind my parents who were sitting on the couch. It was the blood test scene. When the blood jumped up from the petri dish, I SCREAMED and took off running.

Years later, my dad told me he couldn't move for a minute thinking his heart was going to explode. I don't think my mom ever watched a scary movie again.
 
2020-07-15 6:14:47 PM  
When I was seven or so, my mother would drop me off at a babysitter's house while she went to nursing school. This wasn't some teenager, this was a grown woman with a family, a mean battle axe with mean children and an asshole husband.

One night they put on a horror movie that I later learned was called Pieces. It's a Texas Chainsaw ripoff, very bloody and violent. When I turned my head away from the gore in terror, they all laughed at me. I sat and watched the whole thing with them out of shame, and oh god the nightmares I had after that.

/Mom was pissed when she found out
//Somehow I eventually grew to like horror movies
///Not Pieces though. I've seen better film on my grandmother's eye.
 
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