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(Reuters)   This narco-gen telecommunications stuff is getting scary   (reuters.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, Mexico, Mexico City, Mexican general election, 2006, Andrs Manuel Lpez Obrador, Mexican Drug War, Cartel, Mobile phone, Felipe Caldern  
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1163 clicks; posted to Geek » on 15 Jul 2020 at 1:08 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



18 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-07-15 11:31:11 AM  
"Within 10 minutes, he had company: three armed men dressed in fatigues emblazoned with the logo of a major drug cartel."


Pics or it didn't happen.
 
2020-07-15 1:11:02 PM  
Jeez, if you're going to go through the trouble of tapping into the power of a tower to run your base station and antenna from why not include an uninterruptible power supply with battery backup into the design?  Someone needs to teach these narcos a little something about business continuity.
 
2020-07-15 1:12:01 PM  

studebaker hoch: "Within 10 minutes, he had company: three armed men dressed in fatigues emblazoned with the logo of a major drug cartel."


Pics or it didn't happen.


i probably wouldn't have tried to get pics.
 
2020-07-15 1:19:21 PM  

vestona22: studebaker hoch: "Within 10 minutes, he had company: three armed men dressed in fatigues emblazoned with the logo of a major drug cartel."


Pics or it didn't happen.

i probably wouldn't have tried to get pics.


Come on.....

Everyone loves a selfie
 
2020-07-15 1:20:54 PM  

studebaker hoch: "Within 10 minutes, he had company: three armed men dressed in fatigues emblazoned with the logo of a major drug cartel."


Pics or it didn't happen.


Excuse me gentlemen, would you mind posing for a picture before you castrate me with barbed wire and then slowly lower me into a vat of acid?
 
2020-07-15 1:27:29 PM  
It's a self correcting problem. By tapping into the existing telecomm network, they're exposing themselves to 5G. All the drug lords in Mexico, and their henchmen, should be dead from Covid by the end of the year.
 
2020-07-15 1:30:40 PM  
Narco-antennas are just one aspect of telecom companies' headaches in Mexico. Criminals raid their infrastructure for batteries and copper cables to resell on the black market, executives in the sector told Reuters.

Back in the 19th Century, Australia's brand new telegraph lines kept failing.  No one knew why.

When they investigated, it turns out that the Aboriginies were climbing the poles and stealing the glass insulators, because they were really good for knapping into stone knives and projectile points.   Once the telegraph company figured that out, they started leaving a couple of spare insulators at the bottom of the poles so that no one would steal the ones up on top of the poles.
 
2020-07-15 1:35:31 PM  

studebaker hoch: "Within 10 minutes, he had company: three armed men dressed in fatigues emblazoned with the logo of a major drug cartel."


Pics or it didn't happen.


Meh.  They've really gone corporate with this:

Gangs typically don't bother with camouflage. The Zetas are particularly brash, Craine said. He recalled seeing coolers emblazoned with their logo: the letter Z. A former engineer for Huawei Technologies Co, the Chinese telecom vendor, told Reuters that one of the workers he supervised sent him a photo of a device on a Telesites tower in early 2018 with a sign that read: "This antenna belongs to the Zetas. If any problems arise, please call...," followed by a phone number.
 
2020-07-15 1:52:16 PM  
Also, I read this and got a laugh:

When it comes to communicating in real-time with large groups, radio is tough to beat. These networks are often encrypted and, unlike cellular networks, the location of someone using a radio can't easily be pinpointed, said Paul Craine, a former director of the DEA's operations in Mexico and Central America.

That's kind of true, in that it's harder to do it without specialized equipment.  This is something that in general, most telecom companies don't have installed.  And it is why radios, even unencrypted ones, are generally more secure than cellphones.  Without equipment to intercept and locate it in range and working when the communications are actually happening, it's gone forever.  There aren't records that can be accessed after the fact like with cell communications.

Having said that, every year I and a couple other hams teach Cub Scouts how to find hidden transmitters with directional antennas.   They always manage to find the hidden "fox".  It's not *QUITE* the same thing, of course, but the principles are the exact same:  You use directional antennas to tell where the signal is coming from.

If the US was willing to fly some RC-12 or RU-21 GUARDRAIL aircraft down there, or even MQ-9 Reapers with SIGINT package, they'd be located pretty quickly.

Remember ditty's dictum:  If you radiate, you can located.  If you can be located, you can be killed.
 
2020-07-15 1:54:12 PM  

Munden: Jeez, if you're going to go through the trouble of tapping into the power of a tower to run your base station and antenna from why not include an uninterruptible power supply with battery backup into the design?  Someone needs to teach these narcos a little something about business continuity.


They got the idea from Harvard MBAs that said the roi wasn't there because the cell tower uptime was too high.
 
2020-07-15 1:55:02 PM  

Geotpf: studebaker hoch: "Within 10 minutes, he had company: three armed men dressed in fatigues emblazoned with the logo of a major drug cartel."


Pics or it didn't happen.

Meh.  They've really gone corporate with this:


I saw them back before they sold out and went commercial.
 
2020-07-15 2:06:27 PM  

studebaker hoch: "Within 10 minutes, he had company: three armed men dressed in fatigues emblazoned with the logo of a major drug cartel."


Pics or it didn't happen.


They have farking logos?!
 
2020-07-15 2:58:36 PM  
AT&T said that "under no circumstances" does it "tolerate or authorize payments outside of those established by law."

I don't believe for a second that AT&T wouldn't pay these "fees" as part of "the cost of doing business". They may not officially acknowledge it, but I guarantee they pay it. Companies like Dole have been paying ransom and extortion costs in South America for decades. They have contractors dedicated to communicating and handling these payments to the cartels. They usually mark it down under "security" on the ledger.
 
2020-07-15 4:42:35 PM  

Munden: Jeez, if you're going to go through the trouble of tapping into the power of a tower to run your base station and antenna from why not include an uninterruptible power supply with battery backup into the design?  Someone needs to teach these narcos a little something about business continuity.


Some of them very likely do - amazing what you can get done with ridiculously sized heaps of money.  Also not too surprised that it's mostly been "Hey, quit that" stuff.  Even pretty crazed narcos are likely understand that you gotta have comm in order to run any kind of organization - and since they don't control the overall network it's not terribly useful to go all Casino on the techs.  Get the same thing sometimes with plumbers, cable guys, yadda... even narcos need shiat fixed and neither they nor the staff thugs are likely to be useful in that regard.
 
2020-07-15 5:27:49 PM  

RobotSpider: AT&T said that "under no circumstances" does it "tolerate or authorize payments outside of those established by law."

I don't believe for a second that AT&T wouldn't pay these "fees" as part of "the cost of doing business". They may not officially acknowledge it, but I guarantee they pay it. Companies like Dole have been paying ransom and extortion costs in South America for decades. They have contractors dedicated to communicating and handling these payments to the cartels. They usually mark it down under "security" on the ledger.


Paying bribes to anybody, including gangsters, is technically against American law.  Now, small amounts of "grease money" are allowed, and the sums involved are probably small enough to fall under that definition, but, still, no US company will admit to doing even that.
 
2020-07-15 7:16:12 PM  

MikeyFuccon: studebaker hoch: "Within 10 minutes, he had company: three armed men dressed in fatigues emblazoned with the logo of a major drug cartel."


Pics or it didn't happen.

They have farking logos?!

Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-15 7:39:16 PM  

studebaker hoch: "Within 10 minutes, he had company: three armed men dressed in fatigues emblazoned with the logo of a major drug cartel."


Pics or it didn't happen.


Live or ask the dudes for pics.   i pick Live
 
2020-07-15 7:40:16 PM  
and the best part(tm) is that Mexicans are not allowed to have guns.
 
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