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(Digital Spy)   Baby Yoda exists in the Marvel Universe   (digitalspy.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Fantastic Four, Galactus, Marvel Comics, Star Wars, cute Baby Yoda, latest edition of comic book Empyre, Luke Skywalker, Stan Lee  
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2641 clicks; posted to Entertainment » and Geek » on 15 Jul 2020 at 3:05 AM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-15 2:39:43 AM  
When did people start demanding that their escapist fiction exist in a persistent and internally consistent alternate universe?

Like, once upon a time this sort of line would be a wink to the reader. A throwaway joke. Don't think too hard about it. And sometimes a character from one show would guest star on another show and that would be fun and not meant to imply that the two shows existed in the same universe.

Now we've got obsessives updating massive flowcharts tracking every reference and crossover to fit them all into some continuous narrative. We've got endless arguments over canon. We've got endless clickbait over "X is now part of the Y universe!!!!" Where the hell did this start?

Crossovers are as old as Greek mythology. As far as I can tell, the debate over "canonicity" in those crossovers really doesn't exist until very recently; even in the US comic scene (which I'm pretty sure was the epicenter of this phenomenon) there wasn't much effort spent trying to keep everyone and everything in the same "canon" until the Crisis on Infinite Earths attempt to rationalise all of the various depictions of DC's various heroes and establish one canonical universe. But even that's sort of a symptom rather than a cause; before that I feel like most readers wouldn't really give a shiat whether the guy who shot Batman's parents had a different name in a February 1972 comic than he did in a November 1965 comic.

I don't have an answer. I'm just wondering where this impulse started.
 
2020-07-15 3:08:49 AM  
Oh good, I was starting to wonder if I'd ever sleep again.
 
2020-07-15 3:09:04 AM  
Star Wars happened long ago and a galaxy far away, baby yoda can be in every fictional universe.
 
2020-07-15 3:09:31 AM  

pkjun: When did people start demanding that their escapist fiction exist in a persistent and internally consistent alternate universe?


after Star Wars
 
2020-07-15 3:12:34 AM  

pkjun: When did people start demanding that their escapist fiction exist in a persistent and internally consistent alternate universe?


non joke answer, when it stopped being escapist fiction for people but the thing they care about the most and people were not shunned for it. People do not have to "grow up" any more, the escapist fiction can be the lives.

and probably the internet is at fault,
 
2020-07-15 3:23:33 AM  

pkjun: When did people start demanding that their escapist fiction exist in a persistent and internally consistent alternate universe?


Don't think people demanded it, but more of a "how to squeeze as much money out this as we can"... safe to say almost everything comes down to money.  Sad as well, since creativity takes a back seat to profits...
 
2020-07-15 3:32:59 AM  
If the author wants to jerk me off that bad he could just come over.
 
2020-07-15 3:33:20 AM  
And? Why is this a problem?

And it's not anything new; back in 1989 in the pages of Fantastic Four, Thing was talking about Tim Burton's 'Batman' film. Hell, I wasn't reading/collecting back then, but I'd be willing to bet 'Star Wars' was mentioned a few times by Marvel characters back in 1977. For Fark's Sake... Godzilla is officially part of the Marvel Universe. As in, *actually* rampaged on Marvel Earth-616, SHIELD having a dedicated task force to try and stop him back in the early 80's; the whole works. It wasn't just a tie-in comic like Marvel's Star Wars line was/is; Godzilla legit straight up fought Marvel characters in his comic.

Marvel always works cultural/pop touchstones into their stories.
 
2020-07-15 3:46:24 AM  
From the context provided by the article this doesn't necessarily mean Baby Yoda exists in the Marvel Universe, it could only means that the TV show The Mandalorian exists in the Marvel Universe.  Which would make this more of a pop culture reference than an actual cross-over.
 
2020-07-15 3:57:57 AM  

pkjun: When did people start demanding that their escapist fiction exist in a persistent and internally consistent alternate universe?


After the Bible.
 
2020-07-15 4:10:38 AM  
I'll just leave this here:
pics.onsizzle.comView Full Size

Is Star Wars in the Indiana Jones Universe?

BTW, that's not my caption.
 
2020-07-15 4:25:29 AM  
Star Wars has canonically existed in the MCU since Captain America Civil War.
As of Spider-Man homecoming I think it's currently 2023 in the MCU right now, too. In theory that means the MCU currently has Star Wars characters we haven't seen yet in the lame, sub optimal, no-Spider-Man-having world in which we actually live.
 
2020-07-15 4:43:07 AM  
Anything that tickles the jollies of developmentally stunted manboys eventually makes it into the MCU.
 
2020-07-15 4:51:19 AM  

ReaverZ: non joke answer, when it stopped being escapist fiction for people but the thing they care about the most and people were not shunned for it. People do not have to "grow up" any more, the escapist fiction can be the lives.


"The theme of tahrif was first explored in the writings of Ibn Hazm (10th century), who rejected claims of Mosaic authorship and posited that Ezra was the author of the Torah. His arguments against the authenticity of the biblical text in both the Tanakh and New Testament included chronological and geographical inaccuracies and contradictions; what he considered theological impossibilities (anthropomorphic expressions, stories of extramarital sex, and the attributing of sins to prophets), as well as what he saw as a lack of reliable transmission (tawatur) of the text."

"Psssht, first of all that totally contradicts what the earlier book in this series said, plus how did they even get there that fast, and besides that, anyone who has paid attention to the story knows that this stuff they're doing in Chapter 8 is TOTALLY out of character for this whole group. Worst. Bible. Ever."
-- 10th century Bible Book Guy
 
2020-07-15 5:56:30 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-15 6:39:18 AM  
When is Goofy making his MCU debut?
 
2020-07-15 6:43:58 AM  
I'm glad I'm old enough to not be bothered by the fact that Disney owns and is going to ruin everything from my childhood that I loved. At least they don't own Star Trek. Oh, wait...
 
2020-07-15 6:56:31 AM  

Drearyx: When is Goofy making his MCU debut?


Technically he already did, in The Phantom Menace.

/Yousa peeople gonna die?
//A-hyuk, hyuk, yuk yuk.
 
2020-07-15 6:59:09 AM  
Yeah, and Captain Marvel's cat is named chewie in the comics.. after, you know, star wars.
 
2020-07-15 7:04:24 AM  
external-content.duckduckgo.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-15 7:11:28 AM  
*cringe*
 
2020-07-15 7:26:11 AM  

ReaverZ: pkjun: When did people start demanding that their escapist fiction exist in a persistent and internally consistent alternate universe?

after Star Wars


Nerds were arguing over plot holes in TOS, LOTR and Dragon Riders of Pern in the 1970s.
 
2020-07-15 7:26:36 AM  

pkjun: When did people start demanding that their escapist fiction exist in a persistent and internally consistent alternate universe?

Like, once upon a time this sort of line would be a wink to the reader. A throwaway joke. Don't think too hard about it. And sometimes a character from one show would guest star on another show and that would be fun and not meant to imply that the two shows existed in the same universe.

Now we've got obsessives updating massive flowcharts tracking every reference and crossover to fit them all into some continuous narrative. We've got endless arguments over canon. We've got endless clickbait over "X is now part of the Y universe!!!!" Where the hell did this start?

Crossovers are as old as Greek mythology. As far as I can tell, the debate over "canonicity" in those crossovers really doesn't exist until very recently; even in the US comic scene (which I'm pretty sure was the epicenter of this phenomenon) there wasn't much effort spent trying to keep everyone and everything in the same "canon" until the Crisis on Infinite Earths attempt to rationalise all of the various depictions of DC's various heroes and establish one canonical universe. But even that's sort of a symptom rather than a cause; before that I feel like most readers wouldn't really give a shiat whether the guy who shot Batman's parents had a different name in a February 1972 comic than he did in a November 1965 comic.

I don't have an answer. I'm just wondering where this impulse started.


A lot of dorks worry hard about consistency in their fantasy, it's the hobgoblin of their weak minds.
 
2020-07-15 7:34:19 AM  
Meh...So is Dragon Ball Z...Thanks Miles
i-cdn.embed.lyView Full Size
 
2020-07-15 7:42:28 AM  
Or, more likely, Franklin lives in this world and was referencing the show.  Why go be all stupid about it?
 
2020-07-15 7:54:12 AM  

pkjun: When did people start demanding that their escapist fiction exist in a persistent and internally consistent alternate universe?

Like, once upon a time this sort of line would be a wink to the reader. A throwaway joke. Don't think too hard about it. And sometimes a character from one show would guest star on another show and that would be fun and not meant to imply that the two shows existed in the same universe.

Now we've got obsessives updating massive flowcharts tracking every reference and crossover to fit them all into some continuous narrative. We've got endless arguments over canon. We've got endless clickbait over "X is now part of the Y universe!!!!" Where the hell did this start?

Crossovers are as old as Greek mythology. As far as I can tell, the debate over "canonicity" in those crossovers really doesn't exist until very recently; even in the US comic scene (which I'm pretty sure was the epicenter of this phenomenon) there wasn't much effort spent trying to keep everyone and everything in the same "canon" until the Crisis on Infinite Earths attempt to rationalise all of the various depictions of DC's various heroes and establish one canonical universe. But even that's sort of a symptom rather than a cause; before that I feel like most readers wouldn't really give a shiat whether the guy who shot Batman's parents had a different name in a February 1972 comic than he did in a November 1965 comic.

I don't have an answer. I'm just wondering where this impulse started.


I present to you, the Tommy Westphall Universe. I believe this helped start the trend of mashing the worlds of various fictions together.
 
2020-07-15 8:21:11 AM  

pkjun: When did people start demanding that their escapist fiction exist in a persistent and internally consistent alternate universe?

Like, once upon a time this sort of line would be a wink to the reader. A throwaway joke. Don't think too hard about it. And sometimes a character from one show would guest star on another show and that would be fun and not meant to imply that the two shows existed in the same universe.

Now we've got obsessives updating massive flowcharts tracking every reference and crossover to fit them all into some continuous narrative. We've got endless arguments over canon. We've got endless clickbait over "X is now part of the Y universe!!!!" Where the hell did this start?

Crossovers are as old as Greek mythology. As far as I can tell, the debate over "canonicity" in those crossovers really doesn't exist until very recently; even in the US comic scene (which I'm pretty sure was the epicenter of this phenomenon) there wasn't much effort spent trying to keep everyone and everything in the same "canon" until the Crisis on Infinite Earths attempt to rationalise all of the various depictions of DC's various heroes and establish one canonical universe. But even that's sort of a symptom rather than a cause; before that I feel like most readers wouldn't really give a shiat whether the guy who shot Batman's parents had a different name in a February 1972 comic than he did in a November 1965 comic.

I don't have an answer. I'm just wondering where this impulse started.


i.ytimg.comView Full Size


This isn't what happened! Does everyone have amnesia! He didn't get out of the cockadoodie car!
 
2020-07-15 8:32:31 AM  

pkjun: When did people start demanding that their escapist fiction exist in a persistent and internally consistent alternate universe?


Patton Oswalt' s Star Wars And Marvel Cross Over Epic idea
Youtube JYNDssdsVnM
 
2020-07-15 9:00:13 AM  
I have no doubt within 20 years there will be a full cross over between Star wars and Marvel.
 
2020-07-15 9:18:02 AM  

EwoksSuck: I have no doubt within 20 years there will be a full cross over between Star wars and Marvel.


Fark user imageView Full Size

From a certain point of view...
 
2020-07-15 9:21:37 AM  

Mooammar Al-Cowddafi: "how to squeeze as much money out this as we can".


People say that about Star Wars all the time. Then why wasn't there a Star Wars every two years after Return of the Jedi? Even the whores of Disney didn't throw out Baby Yoda dolls when The Mandalorean first came out.

Yeah, Star Wars is a marketing machine up to a point but it's no Marvel.
 
2020-07-15 10:00:39 AM  

Mugato: Mooammar Al-Cowddafi: "how to squeeze as much money out this as we can".

People say that about Star Wars all the time. Then why wasn't there a Star Wars every two years after Return of the Jedi? Even the whores of Disney didn't throw out Baby Yoda dolls when The Mandalorean first came out.

Yeah, Star Wars is a marketing machine up to a point but it's no Marvel.


You're right, it's definitely no Marvel.

Here me out though, making Star Wars every two years would have been bad for business. Plus George Lucas already had a "plan" for the story which required better special effects not available at the time.

Movie producers/investors have gotten smarter, and won't gamble as much anymore.  So now they'd probably wait for success before manufacturing merchandise.
 
2020-07-15 10:05:19 AM  
I don't give a shiat unless ALF appears.
 
2020-07-15 10:28:30 AM  

Mugato: Then why wasn't there a Star Wars every two years after Return of the Jedi?


because Lucas had toys and games and little talent
 
2020-07-15 10:30:32 AM  

Mooammar Al-Cowddafi: You're right, it's definitely no Marvel.


Right, Marvel made a dozen good movies.
 
2020-07-15 10:39:23 AM  

likefunbutnot: Star Wars has canonically existed in the MCU since Captain America Civil War.
As of Spider-Man homecoming I think it's currently 2023 in the MCU right now, too. In theory that means the MCU currently has Star Wars characters we haven't seen yet in the lame, sub optimal, no-Spider-Man-having world in which we actually live.


Yeah, but film and TV production may have been put on hold for a bit after the Snappening. In Endgame, it seems like it was a bad five years.
 
2020-07-15 10:39:30 AM  
and one of the "Dannizens" in Doom Patrol sports an Arishkage tattoo , so Gi Joe exists in the Arrow Verse.
 
2020-07-15 10:45:18 AM  

RoyFokker'sGhost: And? Why is this a problem?

And it's not anything new; back in 1989 in the pages of Fantastic Four, Thing was talking about Tim Burton's 'Batman' film. Hell, I wasn't reading/collecting back then, but I'd be willing to bet 'Star Wars' was mentioned a few times by Marvel characters back in 1977. For Fark's Sake... Godzilla is officially part of the Marvel Universe. As in, *actually* rampaged on Marvel Earth-616, SHIELD having a dedicated task force to try and stop him back in the early 80's; the whole works. It wasn't just a tie-in comic like Marvel's Star Wars line was/is; Godzilla legit straight up fought Marvel characters in his comic.

Marvel always works cultural/pop touchstones into their stories.


The best part was when SHIELD used Pym Particles to shrink Godzilla down to human size and put a trenchcoat and hat on him as disguise.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-15 11:02:45 AM  
Also part of the Marvel universe:

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-15 11:16:01 AM  

pkjun: When did people start demanding that their escapist fiction exist in a persistent and internally consistent alternate universe?

Like, once upon a time this sort of line would be a wink to the reader. A throwaway joke. Don't think too hard about it. And sometimes a character from one show would guest star on another show and that would be fun and not meant to imply that the two shows existed in the same universe.

Now we've got obsessives updating massive flowcharts tracking every reference and crossover to fit them all into some continuous narrative. We've got endless arguments over canon. We've got endless clickbait over "X is now part of the Y universe!!!!" Where the hell did this start?

Crossovers are as old as Greek mythology. As far as I can tell, the debate over "canonicity" in those crossovers really doesn't exist until very recently; even in the US comic scene (which I'm pretty sure was the epicenter of this phenomenon) there wasn't much effort spent trying to keep everyone and everything in the same "canon" until the Crisis on Infinite Earths attempt to rationalise all of the various depictions of DC's various heroes and establish one canonical universe. But even that's sort of a symptom rather than a cause; before that I feel like most readers wouldn't really give a shiat whether the guy who shot Batman's parents had a different name in a February 1972 comic than he did in a November 1965 comic.

I don't have an answer. I'm just wondering where this impulse started.


It's always been an impulse, but it became a prominent pop culture phenomenon with the advent of persistent and infinitely reproducible media.

Readers didn't care if the name of name of the Wayne's killer changed because most readers of the latter didn't have access to the former.

Once you could pull up digital copies of both simultaneously that was no longer the case.
 
2020-07-15 11:56:48 AM  

Mooammar Al-Cowddafi: Mugato: Mooammar Al-Cowddafi: "how to squeeze as much money out this as we can".

People say that about Star Wars all the time. Then why wasn't there a Star Wars every two years after Return of the Jedi? Even the whores of Disney didn't throw out Baby Yoda dolls when The Mandalorean first came out.

Yeah, Star Wars is a marketing machine up to a point but it's no Marvel.

You're right, it's definitely no Marvel.

Here me out though, making Star Wars every two years would have been bad for business. Plus George Lucas already had a "plan" for the story which required better special effects not available at the time.

Movie producers/investors have gotten smarter, and won't gamble as much anymore.  So now they'd probably wait for success before manufacturing merchandise.


How could not putting out a new Star Wars movie every two (three actually) possibly be bad for business?
 
2020-07-15 11:58:15 AM  

Mugato: Mooammar Al-Cowddafi: Mugato: Mooammar Al-Cowddafi: "how to squeeze as much money out this as we can".

People say that about Star Wars all the time. Then why wasn't there a Star Wars every two years after Return of the Jedi? Even the whores of Disney didn't throw out Baby Yoda dolls when The Mandalorean first came out.

Yeah, Star Wars is a marketing machine up to a point but it's no Marvel.

You're right, it's definitely no Marvel.

Here me out though, making Star Wars every two years would have been bad for business. Plus George Lucas already had a "plan" for the story which required better special effects not available at the time.

Movie producers/investors have gotten smarter, and won't gamble as much anymore.  So now they'd probably wait for success before manufacturing merchandise.

How could not putting out a new Star Wars movie every two (three actually) possibly be bad for business?


take "not" out of that post.
 
2020-07-15 11:59:12 AM  
Stop the presses!

A Marvel character has referred to a Star Wars character in a comic book! Star Wars exists in the Marvel Universe!

Oh wait, Star Wars MOVIES and TV SHOWS exist int he Marvel Universe. The reference uses the technically incorrect term "Baby Yoda" though the actual character is NOT Yoda, and officially referred to as "The Child". If Star Wars and Marvel shared a "Universe" they would not exist in the same time frame (Star Wars happens in the far flung future).

If anything, the Marvel character using a pop culture reference to The Child means Star Wars and Marvel do not share the same universe at all, just that Star Wars is a franchise of fictional stories that also exists in Marvel's universe as a franchise of fictional stories (movies, TV shows and books)
 
2020-07-15 12:21:56 PM  

LesserEvil: Stop the presses!

A Marvel character has referred to a Star Wars character in a comic book! Star Wars exists in the Marvel Universe!

Oh wait, Star Wars MOVIES and TV SHOWS exist int he Marvel Universe. The reference uses the technically incorrect term "Baby Yoda" though the actual character is NOT Yoda, and officially referred to as "The Child". If Star Wars and Marvel shared a "Universe" they would not exist in the same time frame (Star Wars happens in the far flung future).

If anything, the Marvel character using a pop culture reference to The Child means Star Wars and Marvel do not share the same universe at all, just that Star Wars is a franchise of fictional stories that also exists in Marvel's universe as a franchise of fictional stories (movies, TV shows and books)


Jesus, go read
 
2020-07-15 12:28:38 PM  

pkjun: When did people start demanding that their escapist fiction exist in a persistent and internally consistent alternate universe?

Like, once upon a time this sort of line would be a wink to the reader. A throwaway joke. Don't think too hard about it. And sometimes a character from one show would guest star on another show and that would be fun and not meant to imply that the two shows existed in the same universe.

Now we've got obsessives updating massive flowcharts tracking every reference and crossover to fit them all into some continuous narrative. We've got endless arguments over canon. We've got endless clickbait over "X is now part of the Y universe!!!!" Where the hell did this start?

Crossovers are as old as Greek mythology. As far as I can tell, the debate over "canonicity" in those crossovers really doesn't exist until very recently; even in the US comic scene (which I'm pretty sure was the epicenter of this phenomenon) there wasn't much effort spent trying to keep everyone and everything in the same "canon" until the Crisis on Infinite Earths attempt to rationalise all of the various depictions of DC's various heroes and establish one canonical universe. But even that's sort of a symptom rather than a cause; before that I feel like most readers wouldn't really give a shiat whether the guy who shot Batman's parents had a different name in a February 1972 comic than he did in a November 1965 comic.

I don't have an answer. I'm just wondering where this impulse started.


So, what you're saying basically is this?

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-15 12:46:47 PM  
Product ties ins for IP owned by the same mega corp, is managed by Department of Duh, located next to the Department of Redundancy Department, in case you hadn't found their offices yet.


Why yes we do own all that, and can use them both to help sell them both, thanks for noticing.
 
2020-07-15 3:13:37 PM  

LesserEvil: The reference uses the technically incorrect term "Baby Yoda" though the actual character is NOT Yoda, and officially referred to as "The Child"


It's just a nick name because there's no other alternative and "The Child" is just creepy.
 
2020-07-15 5:37:46 PM  

Mad_Radhu: Also part of the Marvel universe:

[Fark user image 299x445]


A human supervillain from the Transformers comics also showed up in Secret Wars  2 in the late 80s. And just to continue the chain, Godzilla and the Shogun Warriors were both part of the Marvel comics universe in the early 80s, with the last appearance of Dr. Demonicus and a "mutated" Godzilla appearing in an issue of Iron Man in maybe 1986. The Micronauts, ROM and Crystarr also crossed with mainstream Marvel, with Bug from the Micronauts still showing up periodically in Guardians of the Galaxy comics from time to time. Also David Letterman made on-panel, in-continuity appearances in the Avengers in about 1982. From that you can literally derive a Six Degrees of Kevin Bacon for almost any comic character.

Since Hasbro now owns the GoBots, a being from Gobotron has also appeared in IDW Transformers  comic books, which have also crossed over with Star Trek and GI Joe at least once.

In other weird crossovers, Xenomorphs from Aliens were responsible for the first time the Wildstorm family of comics had a cosmic-grade reset. Mos

Xenomorphs, Predator aliens,Hellboy, Spawn and the OG Enterprise crew have all crossed over with just about everything in the comics world at least once.
 
2020-07-15 5:55:39 PM  

PlaidJaguar: pkjun: When did people start demanding that their escapist fiction exist in a persistent and internally consistent alternate universe?

Like, once upon a time this sort of line would be a wink to the reader. A throwaway joke. Don't think too hard about it. And sometimes a character from one show would guest star on another show and that would be fun and not meant to imply that the two shows existed in the same universe.

Now we've got obsessives updating massive flowcharts tracking every reference and crossover to fit them all into some continuous narrative. We've got endless arguments over canon. We've got endless clickbait over "X is now part of the Y universe!!!!" Where the hell did this start?

Crossovers are as old as Greek mythology. As far as I can tell, the debate over "canonicity" in those crossovers really doesn't exist until very recently; even in the US comic scene (which I'm pretty sure was the epicenter of this phenomenon) there wasn't much effort spent trying to keep everyone and everything in the same "canon" until the Crisis on Infinite Earths attempt to rationalise all of the various depictions of DC's various heroes and establish one canonical universe. But even that's sort of a symptom rather than a cause; before that I feel like most readers wouldn't really give a shiat whether the guy who shot Batman's parents had a different name in a February 1972 comic than he did in a November 1965 comic.

I don't have an answer. I'm just wondering where this impulse started.

It's always been an impulse, but it became a prominent pop culture phenomenon with the advent of persistent and infinitely reproducible media.

Readers didn't care if the name of name of the Wayne's killer changed because most readers of the latter didn't have access to the former.

Once you could pull up digital copies of both simultaneously that was no longer the case.


I just miss the old days when you could make Jimmy Olsen an ape every 3 years and no one would notice the difference
 
2020-07-15 8:44:41 PM  

Mugato: Mugato: Mooammar Al-Cowddafi: Mugato: Mooammar Al-Cowddafi: "how to squeeze as much money out this as we can".

People say that about Star Wars all the time. Then why wasn't there a Star Wars every two years after Return of the Jedi? Even the whores of Disney didn't throw out Baby Yoda dolls when The Mandalorean first came out.

Yeah, Star Wars is a marketing machine up to a point but it's no Marvel.

You're right, it's definitely no Marvel.

Here me out though, making Star Wars every two years would have been bad for business. Plus George Lucas already had a "plan" for the story which required better special effects not available at the time.

Movie producers/investors have gotten smarter, and won't gamble as much anymore.  So now they'd probably wait for success before manufacturing merchandise.

How could not putting out a new Star Wars movie every two (three actually) possibly be bad for business?

take "not" out of that post.


Just woke up...more sober now.  So, I guess was trying to say so terribly earlier, was that the way they made movies in the 70's and 80's was very different from how they make them now.  If they had the super team of witty writers, all that careful planning, testing, clever marketing, and CGI back then...I'm sure they could crank out a great film every two years.  But what they had was George Lucas, and cocaine....so much cocaine, and all he did was shiat out "The Phantom Menace" after 16 years.
 
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