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(USA Today)   Airline workers are looking at a grim future. Unless they work for Delta   (usatoday.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Airline, Avianca, Tuesdaythe airline, Delta Air Lines, Delta CEO Ed Bastian, top of the list of reasons customers, Northwest Airlines, airline's earnings conference call  
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782 clicks; posted to Business » on 14 Jul 2020 at 3:46 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



14 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-07-14 3:05:01 PM  
18 inches, dude
 
2020-07-14 3:13:08 PM  
But you're still flying Delta.
 
2020-07-14 3:15:26 PM  
Tell that to the 246 folks in Michigan (pdf link) that got a notice:
https://www.michigan.gov/documents/le​o​/2020-07-09_Delta_Airlines_WARN_Notice​_696174_7.pdf
 
2020-07-14 3:22:53 PM  

Opacity: Tell that to the 246 folks in Michigan (pdf link) that got a notice:
https://www.michigan.gov/documents/leo​/2020-07-09_Delta_Airlines_WARN_Notice​_696174_7.pdf


United may lay off 36,000.
 
2020-07-14 3:24:36 PM  
Boeing is probably going to wind up firing half their employees. That entire industry is just going to be so FUBAR for a few years.
 
2020-07-14 3:37:28 PM  

edmo: Opacity: Tell that to the 246 folks in Michigan (pdf link) that got a notice:
https://www.michigan.gov/documents/leo​/2020-07-09_Delta_Airlines_WARN_Notice​_696174_7.pdf

United may lay off 36,000.


And American will likely be somewhere in between. It's the initial volley, and Delta employees aren't immune. Likely by the time 2022 is over there will be 100,000 airline workers out of work. That's not including subcontractors, airport concessions, etc.
 
2020-07-14 4:03:05 PM  
patently absurd that doing this activity is a competitive advantage
 
2020-07-14 4:03:20 PM  
I don't know if that's a good thing for Delta in the long term, though. If it makes them burn through their cash on hand, it may leave them in a worse position during the recovery.
 
2020-07-14 4:12:19 PM  
Peep Delta
 
2020-07-14 4:20:29 PM  

We Ate the Necco Wafers: I don't know if that's a good thing for Delta in the long term, though. If it makes them burn through their cash on hand, it may leave them in a worse position during the recovery.


It potentially builds goodwill, even if the safety connection is only in people's minds. I agree that the middle seat thing is "safety theater" (ditto for the "no overhead" policy of some airlines), since you're assuming 95% of the risk just getting on the plane. The only advantage that policy has is that it reduces the number of people on the plane (thus the odds that one of your fellow passengers is infected); the distance is irrelevant at that point.

TFA doesn't go into it, but I wonder how they're doing on their fuel contracts. That might be what's keeping them in the game and able to at least break even on a 66% full flight.

/I don't (or didn't) fly them much domestically, but I've logged 60-80K in each of the last several years on Delta's Pacific routes (PDX-NRT, SEA-HKG, SEA-PEK, SEA-PVG)... to the point where some of their FAs and I recognized each other. I love Delta, their SkyMiles program is great, and I can't wait to get back to it.
 
2020-07-14 4:21:07 PM  

We Ate the Necco Wafers: I don't know if that's a good thing for Delta in the long term, though. If it makes them burn through their cash on hand, it may leave them in a worse position during the recovery.


"recovery"

The airplane of the future is a bus.  Could've been a train, but infrastructure week is a lie.
 
2020-07-14 5:14:06 PM  
Because for Delta employees, their grim future is the present.
 
2020-07-14 7:50:55 PM  

BretMavrik: We Ate the Necco Wafers: I don't know if that's a good thing for Delta in the long term, though. If it makes them burn through their cash on hand, it may leave them in a worse position during the recovery.

It potentially builds goodwill, even if the safety connection is only in people's minds. I agree that the middle seat thing is "safety theater" (ditto for the "no overhead" policy of some airlines), since you're assuming 95% of the risk just getting on the plane. The only advantage that policy has is that it reduces the number of people on the plane (thus the odds that one of your fellow passengers is infected); the distance is irrelevant at that point.

TFA doesn't go into it, but I wonder how they're doing on their fuel contracts. That might be what's keeping them in the game and able to at least break even on a 66% full flight.

/I don't (or didn't) fly them much domestically, but I've logged 60-80K in each of the last several years on Delta's Pacific routes (PDX-NRT, SEA-HKG, SEA-PEK, SEA-PVG)... to the point where some of their FAs and I recognized each other. I love Delta, their SkyMiles program is great, and I can't wait to get back to it.


Fuel is incredibly cheap now.
 
2020-07-14 11:22:23 PM  

emersonbiggins: We Ate the Necco Wafers: I don't know if that's a good thing for Delta in the long term, though. If it makes them burn through their cash on hand, it may leave them in a worse position during the recovery.

"recovery"

The airplane of the future is a bus.  Could've been a train, but infrastructure week is a lie.


Can't wait to take a bus from NY to LA and back.
 
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