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(BBC-US)   Bill Gates partners with engineering firm developing new kinds of turbines to minimize the environmental damage of hydroelectric plants and power his 5G network   (bbc.com) divider line
    More: Cool, Hydroelectricity, Renewable energy, Fossil fuel, world's hydropower capacity, turbine blades, Energy, Water wheel, company Natel Energy  
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388 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Jul 2020 at 7:06 PM (3 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-14 5:34:19 PM  
If I were Bill and had his kind of money, I'd totally troll the hell out of those people. "I've skipped 5G and went straight to 10G!!! And none of you can stop me!!! I have money!!!"
 
2020-07-14 7:14:12 PM  
Last year, the world's hydropower capacity reached a record 1,308 gigawatts (to put this number in perspective, just one gigawatt is equivalent to the power produced by 1.3 million race horses or 2,000 speeding Corvettes)

They're out by a factor of 1,000. Last I checked a Corvette can't pump out 654,000KW.

Commas are only decimal markers in non-English Euro countries.
 
2020-07-14 7:15:24 PM  
Scratch that I read that wrong.
 
2020-07-14 7:21:41 PM  
Tinfoil hatters are already setting fire to 5G towers, let's not publicize new targets for them.
 
2020-07-14 8:06:41 PM  
Those COVID generators take a lot of energy. Good on Bill for his forward thinking. This will save a lot of time and sorosbucks.
 
2020-07-14 8:07:15 PM  

dyhchong: Last year, the world's hydropower capacity reached a record 1,308 gigawatts (to put this number in perspective, just one gigawatt is equivalent to the power produced by 1.3 million race horses or 2,000 speeding Corvettes)

They're out by a factor of 1,000. Last I checked a Corvette can't pump out 654,000KW.

Commas are only decimal markers in non-English Euro countries.


I had a similar thought when I read that, because Watt based the definition of horsepower on figures inflated for marketing reasons, such that his steam engines would look more attractive to industrialists over actual horses.

But I couldn't be arsed to actually figure out the actual numbers behind that comparison.

On the subject of TFA, I'm kinda coming to the notion that local power generation that isn't too harmful to the environment combined with batteries is going to be an important part of power generation going forward. We need a baseload, but, an 11 turbine wind farm (it's the one that Trump hates) provides a lot of power for my city, but with no storage ability I'm aware of. The river Don, in a similar area has had a power generating Archimedes screw installed in the past few years, with a weir bypass for wildlife.

There's always going to be a trade off for having the kinds of lifestyles we live, but small schemes like that writ large, combined with batteries to store the power to smooth out for demand seems to meet the concept of the least environmental damage with the greatest capacity to provide energy.
 
2020-07-14 9:02:28 PM  

iron de havilland: dyhchong: Last year, the world's hydropower capacity reached a record 1,308 gigawatts (to put this number in perspective, just one gigawatt is equivalent to the power produced by 1.3 million race horses or 2,000 speeding Corvettes)

They're out by a factor of 1,000. Last I checked a Corvette can't pump out 654,000KW.

Commas are only decimal markers in non-English Euro countries.

I had a similar thought when I read that, because Watt based the definition of horsepower on figures inflated for marketing reasons, such that his steam engines would look more attractive to industrialists over actual horses.

But I couldn't be arsed to actually figure out the actual numbers behind that comparison.

On the subject of TFA, I'm kinda coming to the notion that local power generation that isn't too harmful to the environment combined with batteries is going to be an important part of power generation going forward. We need a baseload, but, an 11 turbine wind farm (it's the one that Trump hates) provides a lot of power for my city, but with no storage ability I'm aware of. The river Don, in a similar area has had a power generating Archimedes screw installed in the past few years, with a weir bypass for wildlife.

There's always going to be a trade off for having the kinds of lifestyles we live, but small schemes like that writ large, combined with batteries to store the power to smooth out for demand seems to meet the concept of the least environmental damage with the greatest capacity to provide energy.


You don't even need a fancy battery. Use the power to pump water into an upper reservoir and when you need additional energy you can let it run down to a lower reservoir to power a hydro turbine.
 
2020-07-14 9:22:07 PM  
Guess this goes with the territory for the greatest villain of our time other than Soros.

/yeah, someone told me this just today.
 
2020-07-14 9:36:34 PM  
Chutes?
Penstock is the word.
 
2020-07-14 10:13:16 PM  
a record 1,308 gigawatts (to put this number in perspective, just one gigawatt is equivalent to the power produced by 1.3 million race horses or 2,000 speeding Corvettes)

Or over 1,000 time traveling DMC-12s.
 
2020-07-16 4:27:38 AM  
The world's most relied-upon renewable energy source isn't wind or sunlight, but water.

The USA, as usual, is the odd man out.  We get as much electricity from hydro as we do from wind, i.e., not much.
epa.govView Full Size


Biomass is bigger than Solar?
 
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