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(Phys Org2)   When did cats begin domesticating humans?   (phys.org) divider line
    More: Cool, Cat, Neolithic, Domestication, significant research achievements, first domesticated cats, Dr. Magdalena Krajcarz, common history of cats, nitrogen isotopes  
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1168 clicks; posted to Geek » on 14 Jul 2020 at 1:30 AM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-13 9:03:17 PM  
As soon as they realized that most men would do anything for a little pussy
 
2020-07-13 9:20:59 PM  
When did foley artist begin making every cat meow every time?
 
2020-07-13 11:46:36 PM  
When humans began to attract mice and rats. About the time they started storing grain, over 11,000 years ago in bits of the Middle East and Egypt, among other places. Maybe well before that in some places, including the Silk Road and China, because humans began to gather and hunt long before they planted, and began to preserve food with simple processing even before that. Cats know their territory to the square foot at least. Any humans in it would be investigated for threats and resources.
 
2020-07-13 11:56:03 PM  
Let me tell you a story.

Somehow, through some bizarre trick of evolution, a 500 pound deep sea tuna became the absolute favourite food of a ten pound land animal who is deathly afraid of water. I know this is true, because I've witnessed firsthand my sweet little Nefertiti happily munching every last bit of the tuna I give her.

You see the problem. Cats crave tuna. Cats can not obtain tuna. This was a problem for cats for millions of years.

One day, two cats were sitting together on the beach, looking out longingly over the ocean they knew to be filled with endless schools of delicious tuna. As their ancestors had done many times before, they sat and sighed and wished together. But then, one looked down the beach and saw something wonderful.

It was humans, sailing to shore and stepping out of a boat filled with freshly caught fish. The cat turned to its friend and told the friend that it just had a wonderful idea. The brave cat ran over to the humans and looked up at them with open, adorable eyes. The cat began to purr loudly. The cat mewed while brushing against the humans' legs, walking around and around.

The humans gave the cat some tuna. The rest is history.
 
2020-07-14 1:37:14 AM  
encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.comView Full Size


Nov 18, 1985
 
2020-07-14 2:07:15 AM  
They infiltrated our society through clever disguises:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-14 2:08:22 AM  

Gordon Bennett: Somehow, through some bizarre trick of evolution, lasagna 500 pound deep sea tuna became the absolute favourite food.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-14 2:43:08 AM  
FTFA:  A loner and a hunter with highly developed territorial instincts, a cruel carnivore, a disobedient individual: the cat.

Four claims.  Two utter bullshiat.  One a caricature.  And one no different than a dog.

Loner?  Have you seen what Felis catus does when it goes feral?  "Loner" is not even a tiny bit accurate.  Bullshiat.

Hunter with highly developed territorial instincts?  Same as the dog.  What the hell kind of mystery is that supposed to inspire?

Cruel carnivore:  An anthropomorphic caricaturization.  Carnivores aren't cruel in the ethical sense.  Yes, they catch and kill live prey for food... that's not cruel.  In fact, cats' killing methods are more "humane" than other species', like sharks or hyenas.  (Have you seen what those hyenas did to that poor water buffalo's nads?)

Disobedient individual?  Cats will obey owners they trust.  You just have to know cat psychology.  Specifically that negative reinforcement does NOT work to promote positive behavior in cats.  This one is bullshiat, too.

I don't understand the mystery here.  Domestication of cats is about the same age as agriculture.  Humans grow, harvest, and silo crops.  Crops attract vermin.  Vermin attract cats.  Humans and cats benefit.  Someone notices that newborn kittens are cute and cuddly, probably right away,

Interesting thing about cats, even today: if they're not introduced to humans within the first few weeks of life, they will not tolerate human contact as they mature.  So someone's daughter inevitably found some cute cuddly kittens, handled them very young, adopted them, then suddenly Dad took credit and said "Hey, look at my tame rat-hunting machines!"  Before long, humans --being humans-- would have selectively bred them for desireable appearance and behavior,

Inevitably, someone developed a culture including domesticated cats, and exported "tame" cats along with their excess grain and childrens' macaroni art.  Cats spread around alongside human agriculture.  The rest of the story we know...

The origins of canine domestication is possibly more interesting.  We probably used dogs, tame or not, as hunting partners long before the development of agriculture.  I can imagine some very cool stories there... downright awesome Hemingway-London-esque stories... now lost to time.
 
2020-07-14 4:23:27 AM  
When mankind developed agriculture first, we learned to love cats. They had no interest at all in harming our crops, only passing interest in destroying us, but lots of interest in destroying our rodent and bug enemies that messing our crops up.

When mankind learned how to sail and fish for the first time, cats learned to love us back.

I suppose we don't really need each other, but all good friendships are a bit transactional. And humans and cats relationship is upfront about it. Which is good and healthy. Dogs are not as upfront.
 
2020-07-14 4:42:04 AM  
Subby's headline hides some truth behind the comedy. There's strong evidence that cats have never really been domesticated. And if I remember right from a YouTube video on the topic, the human-cat partnership started multiple times, certainly in Cyprus and China independently from each other and maybe in a few other places too. And while having cats around definitely helped humanity, it sure looks like as a species cats gained the most from the arrangement.

I'll never forget one of Terry Pratchett's best quote: "Cats were once worshipped in Ancient Egypt, and they have never forgotten this".
 
2020-07-14 6:59:36 AM  
This article was so poorly written it made my eye twitch.
 
2020-07-14 8:20:41 AM  
In Medieval Poland, cats were not as popular as we could think.

The article certainly upset my assumptions.  I thought I knew Medieval Poland.
 
2020-07-14 8:37:24 AM  
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2020-07-14 8:37:44 AM  

DON.MAC: When did foley artist begin making every cat meow every time?


Frank Welker won't be with us forever
 
2020-07-14 9:23:04 AM  
Things I learned about cat history on YouTube:

Cats were "domesticated" in the middle east/fertile crescent and China almost simultaneously.

Someone was buried with a cat on some island (Crete?) a couple thousand years ago.  You know damn well they didn't get a feral cat on to a boat to get them established on an island.

Thanks SciShow!
 
2020-07-14 9:37:03 AM  

bughunter: Interesting thing about cats, even today: if they're not introduced to humans within the first few weeks of life, they will not tolerate human contact as they mature.


I'm not sure how accurate my view is, but it never really seemed to me that cats were "domesticated".

They seemed more wild animals that if raised from birth with human contact will tolerate humans, similar to some of their slightly larger feline relatives. In general their diet is almost exclusively creatures that humans typically don't eat and also are frequent pests to human activity, they also pose no threat to humans and are far from ideal for humans to eat.

So they can exist in parallel with humans with each species providing benefits to the other with few, if any, detrimental effects in each direction.

It couldn't have taken our ancestors that long to get used to having mostly harmless rodent killing machines hanging around the place.
 
2020-07-14 10:39:12 AM  

brantgoose: When humans began to attract mice and rats. About the time they started storing grain, over 11,000 years ago in bits of the Middle East and Egypt, among other places. Maybe well before that in some places, including the Silk Road and China, because humans began to gather and hunt long before they planted, and began to preserve food with simple processing even before that. Cats know their territory to the square foot at least. Any humans in it would be investigated for threats and resources.


Who are you and what did you do with the real brantgoose?  Useful information and non-rambling,non-wharrgarbl posts will not be tolerated.
 
2020-07-14 11:06:39 AM  

Mister Buttons: Things I learned about cat history on YouTube:

Cats were "domesticated" in the middle east/fertile crescent and China almost simultaneously.

Someone was buried with a cat on some island (Crete?) a couple thousand years ago.  You know damn well they didn't get a feral cat on to a boat to get them established on an island.

Thanks SciShow!


Ah I see you watched the same video that I did I think. But it was Cyprus, not Crete, and not 2 thousand years ago, but nearly ten thousand years ago.That burial site is three times older than Stonehenge. And sure, that's only half the time that we think dogs and humans have been in partnership, but it's still far older than most people realise.
 
2020-07-14 11:12:29 AM  

Target Builder: bughunter: Interesting thing about cats, even today: if they're not introduced to humans within the first few weeks of life, they will not tolerate human contact as they mature.

I'm not sure how accurate my view is, but it never really seemed to me that cats were "domesticated".


You are so wrong.  Let me talk about my 14 yr old cat who I was brushing and getting rid of knots in her fur requiring use of surgical scissors.   I have all of my internal fluids because of a strong hand, weak cat and firm knowledge of how the sharp pointy bits attack. 

Let me take that back.  I'm not leaking even though she objected based only on her self control.

/how do I give a kitty a petticure?  Her claws keep getting stuck in the carpet and her arthritis isn't helping that.
 
2020-07-14 11:36:08 AM  

bughunter: Cruel carnivore:  An anthropomorphic caricaturization.  Carnivores aren't cruel in the ethical sense.  Yes, they catch and kill live prey for food... that's not cruel.  In fact, cats' killing methods are more "humane" than other species', like sharks or hyenas.  (Have you seen what those hyenas did to that poor water buffalo's nads?)


A well fed cat will toy with prey. As a kid our cat would catch a bird, pin it under its chest?. It would then get up and let the bird start to fly, only to tackle it out of the air again. and again and again. It would do this regularly.
A cat will definitely toy with prey if they aren't worried about starving to death.

/Love my cat
 
2020-07-14 11:52:35 AM  
I don't know about most humans, but I know that I got mine when two female cats had kittens within a week in some lady's garage. I brought him into my house and now I'm convinced that he is the reason guppies keep disappearing from my aquarium.
 
2020-07-14 12:37:58 PM  

Macfine: bughunter: Cruel carnivore:  An anthropomorphic caricaturization.  Carnivores aren't cruel in the ethical sense.  Yes, they catch and kill live prey for food... that's not cruel.  In fact, cats' killing methods are more "humane" than other species', like sharks or hyenas.  (Have you seen what those hyenas did to that poor water buffalo's nads?)

A well fed cat will toy with prey. As a kid our cat would catch a bird, pin it under its chest?. It would then get up and let the bird start to fly, only to tackle it out of the air again. and again and again. It would do this regularly.
A cat will definitely toy with prey if they aren't worried about starving to death.

/Love my cat


Both of our well-fed cats have alarmed to us about injured fledglings who fall off the roof and get stuck behind things on the patio. One of them once brought us an injured bird in its mouth.

They are merciless to bugs, though.
 
2020-07-14 1:46:49 PM  
Certainly there are cats of many behaviors. That cat of my parents was an outdoor cat, in a rural area. And was adopted as a semi feral kitten. I don't know the specifics of your cat.

That said my personal current cat has been indoor all her life. In one apartment i lived, there was a mouse that had chewed threw the wall.  We never noticed. My roommate and I were in the kitchen one day and it looked like the cat was fixated at her reflection in the oven glass. Then this cat that had never hunted anything more than a cat toy, charge at a speed previously unseene and clipped the mouse as it ran along the base board to the hole. It Just barely escaped.  It was wild to see the change in demeanor happen so instantly.

This current indoor cat is not a hunter. A year later she dashed out the front door. She ran up to about 3 feet away from a pigeon.She hunkered down like she was hiding in the grass(was on a sidewalk) and and started the pre pounce butt wiggle.  The whole time the pigen, at least as big as her just started her. I quickly scooped her up before a bad decision was made.

The was a power line just outside my bedroom window that a crow would often sit on. My cat would try and talk to it regularly. I don't know how to describe the sound of a cat trying to imitate the sound of a crow, but it was something.
 
2020-07-14 1:51:11 PM  
I have 2 former barn cats and a city cat we inherited from our daughter. They are really different animals. The barn cats are super stealthy, very smart and never knock anything over. The city cat is a big lumbering idiot who makes all kinds of noise.
 
2020-07-14 1:57:09 PM  

SafetyThird: I have 2 former barn cats and a city cat we inherited from our daughter. They are really different animals. The barn cats are super stealthy, very smart and never knock anything over. The city cat is a big lumbering idiot who makes all kinds of noise.


Do the barn cats make fun of the city cat and call him "dandy" and shiat?

Cuz that would be totally catlike.
 
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