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(OilPrice.com)   Japanese firm creates lithium battery that will make Samsung's non-exploding phones even cheaper   (oilprice.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Electrolyte, new kind of battery, Rechargeable battery, lithium-ion batteries, Assembly line, Manufacturing, Nanoarchitectures for lithium-ion batteries, Industry  
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956 clicks; posted to Fandom » on 11 Jul 2020 at 3:20 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



9 Comments     (+0 »)
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2020-07-11 2:13:15 PM  
They mention, at the end, that capacity is smaller. How much smaller, is a key point to understand before getting excited about this.
 
2020-07-11 3:27:46 PM  

beezeltown: They mention, at the end, that capacity is smaller. How much smaller, is a key point to understand before getting excited about this.


I thought the same thing
 
2020-07-11 3:40:03 PM  
/eyeroll

There is a decades-old industry of conning investors by making claims about a breakthrough in battery technology. It's like shooting fish in a barrel, because it seems like a simple thing, but it's actually complex enough to be able to make factual claims that sound good, without actually making any real breakthroughs.

A better article on this specific company:
https://www.bloombergquint.com/techno​l​ogy/nissan-pioneer-touts-resin-battery​-that-s-90-cheaper-to-make

There's a very wide variety of battery technologies that have a small but sustainable market, because some specific characteristic makes it useful in a small niche application. For example, aluminum-air cells are amazingly lightweight for a given amount of stored energy, but they can't deliver much power (you can't get all that energy out very quickly), and they can't be recharged.

Power delivery is usually the factor that battery tech scammers hope their investors will fail to notice, and I think this is the case in TFA. The founder of the company talks a lot about safety and electric cars, because today's batteries need to be really good at supplying power -- that is, a large amount of energy in a short period of time. But replacing metal electrodes with a conductive resin will completely destroy a battery's power delivery. There is no known resin with a low enough electrical resistance to deliver the kind of power that an electric car, laptop, or even a cellphone will require. OP's article says, "While the battery addresses the safety and cost issues of lithium-ion batteries, the resin material is less conductive than metal, so the carrying capacity would be reduced." Yeah, and it's ability to deliver power, too, by a LOT. This company stinks on ice. If they weren't scammers, I think they would identify a real target market, instead of trying to get their investors excited about a mythical 90% cheaper electric car battery.
 
2020-07-11 3:42:50 PM  

snowjack: /eyeroll

There is a decades-old industry of conning investors by making claims about a breakthrough in battery technology. It's like shooting fish in a barrel, because it seems like a simple thing, but it's actually complex enough to be able to make factual claims that sound good, without actually making any real breakthroughs.

A better article on this specific company:
https://www.bloombergquint.com/technol​ogy/nissan-pioneer-touts-resin-battery​-that-s-90-cheaper-to-make

There's a very wide variety of battery technologies that have a small but sustainable market, because some specific characteristic makes it useful in a small niche application. For example, aluminum-air cells are amazingly lightweight for a given amount of stored energy, but they can't deliver much power (you can't get all that energy out very quickly), and they can't be recharged.

Power delivery is usually the factor that battery tech scammers hope their investors will fail to notice, and I think this is the case in TFA. The founder of the company talks a lot about safety and electric cars, because today's batteries need to be really good at supplying power -- that is, a large amount of energy in a short period of time. But replacing metal electrodes with a conductive resin will completely destroy a battery's power delivery. There is no known resin with a low enough electrical resistance to deliver the kind of power that an electric car, laptop, or even a cellphone will require. OP's article says, "While the battery addresses the safety and cost issues of lithium-ion batteries, the resin material is less conductive than metal, so the carrying capacity would be reduced." Yeah, and it's ability to deliver power, too, by a LOT. This company stinks on ice. If they weren't scammers, I think they would identify a real target market, instead of trying to get their investors excited about a mythical 90% cheaper electric car battery.


aye. that.
 
2020-07-11 4:42:15 PM  

beezeltown: They mention, at the end, that capacity is smaller. How much smaller, is a key point to understand before getting excited about this.


Assuming the battery works, it would be great for houses, where size doesn't matter as much.
 
2020-07-11 4:50:18 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: beezeltown: They mention, at the end, that capacity is smaller. How much smaller, is a key point to understand before getting excited about this.

Assuming the battery works, it would be great for houses, where size doesn't matter as much.


I thought the same thing. Assuming it isn't vaporware like 99% of exciting new battery technologies, it sounds like it could be great for grid storage.
 
2020-07-11 8:07:33 PM  
Sounds like another Level 1 battery - they got a 1 cm square lab sample to work.  Level 2 is when they have a solid plan for production.

Call me when the pilot plant is up and producing.  That's Level 3.
 
2020-07-11 8:41:46 PM  

Likwit: Assuming it isn't vaporware like 99% of exciting new battery technologies, it sounds like it could be great for grid storage.


If they ever had intentions of producing anything, they'd be talking about possible real applications for a battery with a resin-based electrode. If there are any, which I doubt. Electric cars ain't it.
 
2020-07-12 1:34:56 AM  
Could we power a phone with a tower sized dry stack?
 
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