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(CNN)   Tyson plans to begin using "robot butchers." We all know how this will end, right?   (cnn.com) divider line
    More: Asinine, Work safety experts, Meat, Poultry, Automation, Livestock, Industry, auto industry, help of some designers  
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543 clicks; posted to Business » on 10 Jul 2020 at 9:22 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



43 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
jbc [TotalFark]
2020-07-10 6:16:42 PM  
If y'all raised enough meat, we wouldn't have to eat cuts of robot.
 
2020-07-10 6:33:06 PM  
Robot butchers with no off switch. This is exactly how I thought it would go down. Say goodnight cockaroaches! *Hutus nod machetely*
 
2020-07-10 6:41:49 PM  
Somehow the meat will still be recalled due to foriegn objects .
 
2020-07-10 6:47:53 PM  
Flat packs of miscellaneous meat parts on sale.

SWEET!
 
2020-07-10 7:24:49 PM  
Sherlock Holmes #8 Movie CLIP - It's a Band Saw (2009) HD
Youtube jb0Cjzd2lKU
 
2020-07-10 7:26:06 PM  

alechemist: Somehow the "meat" will still be recalled due to foriegn objects .



Fixey
 
2020-07-10 8:18:07 PM  
Ah, automation is the answer!

The answer to furloughing thousands of workers, and bringing back a couple hundred.
 
2020-07-10 8:35:42 PM  
external-preview.redd.itView Full Size

C'mon Jimmy, lets take a peek at the killing floor. Don't let the name throw you, Jimmy. It's not really a floor; it's more of a steel grating that allows material to sluice through so it can be collected and exported.
 
2020-07-10 8:58:16 PM  
Who wants to eat a robot? The quarantine isn't that bad yet.
 
2020-07-10 9:30:24 PM  
images-na.ssl-images-amazon.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-10 9:33:12 PM  
I'm not saying we should kill all humans, but kill all humans?
 
2020-07-10 10:06:39 PM  

TheManofPA: I'm not saying we should kill all humans, but kill all humans?


1.bp.blogspot.comView Full Size

What a "robot butcher" may look like.
 
2020-07-10 10:12:53 PM  
upload.wikimedia.orgView Full Size
 
2020-07-10 10:14:48 PM  
But what about the European slaughterhouses?

My children need wine!
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-10 10:17:17 PM  
Butchery is an obvious candidate for automation. I think there have been automated lines for chicken and lamb for quite a while. Fish processing is highly automated. Something like a cow should be no problem.
 
2020-07-10 10:27:43 PM  
This is actually a very interesting problem, because chicken carcasses are all different sizes, so you can't just program a robot to "cut here" like you would in a typical hardware assembly line. You need to scan each chicken and use AI to recognize the joints and make the cuts in the right place.
 
2020-07-10 10:32:16 PM  
I assume the lead robot will be named "Erasmus?"

//That's probably even too obscure for Fark
 
2020-07-10 11:02:28 PM  
...they butcher the cable?

/somebody had to.
 
2020-07-10 11:05:48 PM  

wax_on: Butchery is an obvious candidate for automation. I think there have been automated lines for chicken and lamb for quite a while. Fish processing is highly automated. Something like a cow should be no problem.


Parts are. The WSJ had a better article, but the gist is:

Not all animals are the same in terms of size and fat and bone and meat. Trimming the best parts accurately makes more money as the pink slime and burger meat is pennies compared to solid meat.

/in other words a good butcher pays for himself
//also doesn't cost half a million dollars
///doesn't need much maintenance either
/4 also doesn't run SAP
 
2020-07-10 11:35:27 PM  

ColonelCathcart: in other words a good butcher pays for himself


What does that have to do with what goes on in meat packing plants?
 
2020-07-10 11:54:45 PM  
Follow-up: Value packs of Tyson Robot Breasts are being recalled in 14 states over concerns they may contain bits of meat.
 
2020-07-11 12:24:09 AM  

I_told_you_so: I assume the lead robot will be named "Erasmus?"

//That's probably even too obscure for Fark


Must it be dragging?
 
2020-07-11 12:41:30 AM  
Depends -- it can go two ways, subby...

Fark user imageView Full Size


or

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-11 12:41:49 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-11 12:59:16 AM  
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2020-07-11 1:20:37 AM  

dbirchall: Follow-up: Value packs of Tyson Robot Breasts are being recalled in 14 states over concerns they may contain bits of meat.



Fark user imageView Full Size


"Funny Guy!"
 
Juc [TotalFark]
2020-07-11 1:30:10 AM  
Haven't they been using machines for meat processing for ages already?
 
2020-07-11 2:08:42 AM  

Earguy: Ah, automation is the answer!

The answer to furloughing thousands of workers, and bringing back a couple hundred.


" Down at the well they've got a new machine
The foreman says it cuts man-power by fifteen
Yeah but that ain't natural well so old Clay would say
You see he's a horse-drawn man until his dying day"

excerpt, 'Country Comfort', Bernie Taupin / elton John
 
2020-07-11 2:11:43 AM  
They bite off the cable repairman's ear?
 
2020-07-11 3:18:08 AM  

OptimisticCynicism: ColonelCathcart: in other words a good butcher pays for himself

What does that have to do with what goes on in meat packing plants?


What do you think they do in meat packing plants?

They cut meat. They're butchers.
 
2020-07-11 7:39:37 AM  
Once we move the cloning machine next to the killing machine we can sit back and enjoy our Slurries without lifting a finger.

64.media.tumblr.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-11 11:14:20 AM  
I suspect it will end with even more suffering for the animals and mass lay-offs for the poor souls that rely upon that awful work to provide for their families.
 
2020-07-11 11:27:42 AM  

ColonelCathcart: wax_on: Butchery is an obvious candidate for automation. I think there have been automated lines for chicken and lamb for quite a while. Fish processing is highly automated. Something like a cow should be no problem.

Parts are. The WSJ had a better article, but the gist is:

Not all animals are the same in terms of size and fat and bone and meat. Trimming the best parts accurately makes more money as the pink slime and burger meat is pennies compared to solid meat.

/in other words a good butcher pays for himself
//also doesn't cost half a million dollars
///doesn't need much maintenance either
/4 also doesn't run SAP


Nevertheless, any human activity that can be flow-charted can be done by some form of automation.

And that half-million dollars up-front cost? That is amortized over the life of the asset. For the Robot Butcher, let's assume a pretty-standard (for complex machinery/computers) 5 years, or $100,000 of expense per year.

A quick google for butcher's pay gives: "Butchers and Meat Cutters earn an average wage of Thirty Thousand One Hundred dollars annually." I assume that is for working 8-hour days and 5-day weeks, or 40 hrs per week (2,080 hours per year). That's about $14.47 per hour. Add 10% for benefits and employer payroll taxes, so that's now $15.91 per hour.

But a robot butcher can work 24/7, or 365 x 24 = 8,760 hours per year. Let's be generous and assume a 10% downtime, for a net annual work time of 7,884 hours per year. So the hourly rate for the robot is $100,000 / 7,884 = $12.68 per hour. Let's also assume maintenance costs of 10%, so that comes to $13.95 per hour.

Also: a robot butcher doesn't take smoke and bathroom breaks, cough on the meat, doesn't get sick, and doesn't go on vacations.

Robot wins. Every farking time (eventually).
 
2020-07-11 12:49:53 PM  
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2020-07-11 1:45:09 PM  

Harlee: ColonelCathcart: wax_on: Butchery is an obvious candidate for automation. I think there have been automated lines for chicken and lamb for quite a while. Fish processing is highly automated. Something like a cow should be no problem.

Parts are. The WSJ had a better article, but the gist is:

Not all animals are the same in terms of size and fat and bone and meat. Trimming the best parts accurately makes more money as the pink slime and burger meat is pennies compared to solid meat.

/in other words a good butcher pays for himself
//also doesn't cost half a million dollars
///doesn't need much maintenance either
/4 also doesn't run SAP

Nevertheless, any human activity that can be flow-charted can be done by some form of automation.

And that half-million dollars up-front cost? That is amortized over the life of the asset. For the Robot Butcher, let's assume a pretty-standard (for complex machinery/computers) 5 years, or $100,000 of expense per year.

A quick google for butcher's pay gives: "Butchers and Meat Cutters earn an average wage of Thirty Thousand One Hundred dollars annually." I assume that is for working 8-hour days and 5-day weeks, or 40 hrs per week (2,080 hours per year). That's about $14.47 per hour. Add 10% for benefits and employer payroll taxes, so that's now $15.91 per hour.

But a robot butcher can work 24/7, or 365 x 24 = 8,760 hours per year. Let's be generous and assume a 10% downtime, for a net annual work time of 7,884 hours per year. So the hourly rate for the robot is $100,000 / 7,884 = $12.68 per hour. Let's also assume maintenance costs of 10%, so that comes to $13.95 per hour.

Also: a robot butcher doesn't take smoke and bathroom breaks, cough on the meat, doesn't get sick, and doesn't go on vacations.

Robot wins. Every farking time (eventually).


Yup. That was going to be my response but you beat me to it (and did it better than I would have.)

/made a ton of money automating something that most people didn't think could be automated.
 
2020-07-11 2:14:06 PM  

Juc: Haven't they been using machines for meat processing for ages already?


Well no. They tried them out ages ago. They discovered robots required technicians who are far more expensive than the skilled labor they replaced. And that they had a finite lifespan. And instead of hiring back the skilled workers they shipped in illegal aliens who would work for pennies on the dollar.

And basically they are stuck in that business model because it's a race to the bottom as everyone has consolidated into just a few mega corporations who can pull off cost shifting on an industrial scale. As well as dodge the impact of their illegal shenanigans because ... "job creators" and they can afford lobbiests
 
2020-07-11 2:15:13 PM  

wax_on: Harlee: ColonelCathcart: wax_on: Butchery is an obvious candidate for automation. I think there have been automated lines for chicken and lamb for quite a while. Fish processing is highly automated. Something like a cow should be no problem.

Parts are. The WSJ had a better article, but the gist is:

Not all animals are the same in terms of size and fat and bone and meat. Trimming the best parts accurately makes more money as the pink slime and burger meat is pennies compared to solid meat.

/in other words a good butcher pays for himself
//also doesn't cost half a million dollars
///doesn't need much maintenance either
/4 also doesn't run SAP

Nevertheless, any human activity that can be flow-charted can be done by some form of automation.

And that half-million dollars up-front cost? That is amortized over the life of the asset. For the Robot Butcher, let's assume a pretty-standard (for complex machinery/computers) 5 years, or $100,000 of expense per year.

A quick google for butcher's pay gives: "Butchers and Meat Cutters earn an average wage of Thirty Thousand One Hundred dollars annually." I assume that is for working 8-hour days and 5-day weeks, or 40 hrs per week (2,080 hours per year). That's about $14.47 per hour. Add 10% for benefits and employer payroll taxes, so that's now $15.91 per hour.

But a robot butcher can work 24/7, or 365 x 24 = 8,760 hours per year. Let's be generous and assume a 10% downtime, for a net annual work time of 7,884 hours per year. So the hourly rate for the robot is $100,000 / 7,884 = $12.68 per hour. Let's also assume maintenance costs of 10%, so that comes to $13.95 per hour.

Also: a robot butcher doesn't take smoke and bathroom breaks, cough on the meat, doesn't get sick, and doesn't go on vacations.

Robot wins. Every farking time (eventually).

Yup. That was going to be my response but you beat me to it (and did it better than I would have.)

/made a ton of money automating something that most people didn't think could be automated ...


What was that, if you don't mind my asking? Or is it unique enough that it would "out" your identity?

I was a Controller and Accounting Manager for 45 years. I did a LOT of these kinds of "back of envelope" calculations, and quite a few formal spreadsheet presentations that, unfortunately, eventually resulted in job losses.
 
2020-07-11 3:26:34 PM  
I guess, as long as they have a preset kill limit.
 
2020-07-11 4:12:20 PM  

Harlee: wax_on: Harlee: ColonelCathcart: wax_on: Butchery is an obvious candidate for automation. I think there have been automated lines for chicken and lamb for quite a while. Fish processing is highly automated. Something like a cow should be no problem.

Parts are. The WSJ had a better article, but the gist is:

Not all animals are the same in terms of size and fat and bone and meat. Trimming the best parts accurately makes more money as the pink slime and burger meat is pennies compared to solid meat.

/in other words a good butcher pays for himself
//also doesn't cost half a million dollars
///doesn't need much maintenance either
/4 also doesn't run SAP

Nevertheless, any human activity that can be flow-charted can be done by some form of automation.

And that half-million dollars up-front cost? That is amortized over the life of the asset. For the Robot Butcher, let's assume a pretty-standard (for complex machinery/computers) 5 years, or $100,000 of expense per year.

A quick google for butcher's pay gives: "Butchers and Meat Cutters earn an average wage of Thirty Thousand One Hundred dollars annually." I assume that is for working 8-hour days and 5-day weeks, or 40 hrs per week (2,080 hours per year). That's about $14.47 per hour. Add 10% for benefits and employer payroll taxes, so that's now $15.91 per hour.

But a robot butcher can work 24/7, or 365 x 24 = 8,760 hours per year. Let's be generous and assume a 10% downtime, for a net annual work time of 7,884 hours per year. So the hourly rate for the robot is $100,000 / 7,884 = $12.68 per hour. Let's also assume maintenance costs of 10%, so that comes to $13.95 per hour.

Also: a robot butcher doesn't take smoke and bathroom breaks, cough on the meat, doesn't get sick, and doesn't go on vacations.

Robot wins. Every farking time (eventually).

Yup. That was going to be my response but you beat me to it (and did it better than I would have.)

/made a ton of money automating something that most people didn't think co ...


I worked on electronic prepress. My business partner and I had a small shop that normally would have had 8-10 employees. Instead it was just us and we took all that money home. Back in the 00's I created some tools and business processes that are still industry standard today.
I got bored and could see that bigger competitors were copying our business model so I sold my half of the business to my partner. He's still running it today but making a lot less money. I don't feel bad about the jobs we eliminated. It was inevitable, if we didn't do it someone else would have.
 
2020-07-11 5:14:06 PM  

wax_on: I worked on electronic prepress. My business partner and I had a small shop that normally would have had 8-10 employees. Instead it was just us and we took all that money home. Back in the 00's I created some tools and business processes that are still industry standard today.

I got bored and could see that bigger competitors were copying our business model so I sold my half of the business to my partner. He's still running it today but making a lot less money. I don't feel bad about the jobs we eliminated. It was inevitable, if we didn't do it someone else would have.


Yes. As I point out in the novel, each individual Ownerist (Capitalist) has gotta do what they gotta do to maintain that bottom line. Otherwise, you get eaten. That's the problem with this time around (as compared to the Industrial Revolution): the new tech saves so much money, and is so pervasive, that you have to follow (or ideally) lead the herd.

The social problem that results, however, is everyone is so consumed with tending to their own tree that no one pays attention to the state of the forest. With huge numbers of - not just unemployed but unemployable - people, who the hell is going to have the money to buy the stuff mass produced by the automation?

This does NOT happen in such a straightforward and linear fashion as implied above, and so both process and consequences are obscured... until such time as a tipping point of some sort screws everyone with a "phase change" economic event. Then: economic depression that will made the Great Depression seem like a mild fiscal policy correction. Very bad cultural, political, and military consequences occur.

In the book, The Presence theorizes that - since mass automation is closely correlated with the industry and technology necessary to create a robust space exploration program - this tipping point is a good candidate for the Great Filter that explains the Fermi Paradox. A civilization automates, then can't deal with the transition to a post-scarcity economy and rips itself apart.
 
2020-07-11 9:15:02 PM  
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2020-07-11 10:03:19 PM  
I was going to go with "handy knowledge for SkyNet".
 
2020-07-11 11:18:24 PM  

cefm: [external-preview.redd.it image 850x637]


<roomba-chainsaw.jpg>


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