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(WFAA Fort Worth)   Texas scientists create air filter that kills Coronavirus instantly. BONUS: It's inexpensive to manufacture, and can be retrofitted to work in existing air handling equipment   (wfaa.com) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Rooms, mobile unit, temperature of the ambient air, Dr. Garrett K. Peel of Medistar, 2000s music groups, great thing, Mask, Classroom  
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2438 clicks; posted to Geek » on 10 Jul 2020 at 11:38 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-10 4:28:40 PM  
"Let's say 70 degrees. It may take 10-20 minutes to kill. If you go to 100, it will take a couple minutes. But if you go to 200, that will be instantaneous," Dr. Ren explains.
That's the temperature scientists decided to stick with, using it to heat a filter made of nickel foam, which is more porous and allows the air to pass.
"It filters the virus. It catches it. It kills it. Without impacting the temperature of the ambient air," says Dr. Garrett K. Peel of Medistar.


In THIS house, we obey the laws of thermodynamics.
 
2020-07-10 8:21:11 PM  

Sliding Carp: In THIS house, we obey the laws of thermodynamics.


You sound authoritarian.
It's one of the few times I can approve. :)
 
2020-07-10 9:16:29 PM  
Please make a face mask out of it.  Especially shaped like a Darth Vader helmet that makes me sound like James Earl Jones.
 
2020-07-10 10:00:43 PM  
One of its uses, he suggests, could be in classrooms as Texas students are slated to head back this fall. A mobile unit would be able to filter the air in each room, helping provide a different kind of mask for kids, teachers and staff.

You're not helping.
 
2020-07-10 10:04:07 PM  

syrynxx: Please make a face mask out of it.  Especially shaped like a Darth Vader helmet that makes me sound like James Earl Jones.


Wearing a mask that heats to 200°C may not be a good idea.

/ 392°F
 
2020-07-10 11:22:16 PM  

Driver: syrynxx: Please make a face mask out of it.  Especially shaped like a Darth Vader helmet that makes me sound like James Earl Jones.

Wearing a mask that heats to 200°C may not be a good idea.

/ 392°F


You just need a layer of tinfoil between the mask and your face. You may be able to get some off the getup you're wearing on your head.
 
2020-07-10 11:51:32 PM  
200 degrees C kills a lot of things.  You'd be surprised.
 
2020-07-10 11:55:21 PM  

koder: One of its uses, he suggests, could be in classrooms as Texas students are slated to head back this fall. A mobile unit would be able to filter the air in each room, helping provide a different kind of mask for kids, teachers and staff.

You're not helping.


Indeed. We can already catch kids in simple nets and candy trucks. This tech has no future.
 
2020-07-10 11:55:23 PM  

Driver: syrynxx: Please make a face mask out of it.  Especially shaped like a Darth Vader helmet that makes me sound like James Earl Jones.

Wearing a mask that heats to 200°C may not be a good idea.

/ 392°F


You're not my supervisor!
 
2020-07-10 11:55:59 PM  

koder: One of its uses, he suggests, could be in classrooms as Texas students are slated to head back this fall. A mobile unit would be able to filter the air in each room, helping provide a different kind of mask for kids, teachers and staff.

You're not helping.


Yah, now he just has to figure out how to make the kids breathe into the filter instead of each other's faces and it might actually work for this.
 
2020-07-11 12:03:25 AM  
Scientist: "I invented something that solves a bunch of problems, has no drawbacks, and costs almost nothing!"

Americans: "let's kill him"
 
2020-07-11 12:11:19 AM  
200C is 392F. That's oven temperature. You'll sear your lungs breathing that.

Sounds like, "Hey, I know how to kill the coronavirus! Two bullets to the back of the head of every carrier!"
 
2020-07-11 12:21:30 AM  

dericwater: 200C is 392F. That's oven temperature. You'll sear your lungs breathing that.

Sounds like, "Hey, I know how to kill the coronavirus! Two bullets to the back of the head of every carrier!"


Yeah. I'm betting this article some vast over simplification what is actually happening. Since is it superporous it probably is able to heat very quickly locally without much energy or real temperature increase in the air. It also is probably able to move air through quickly as well.

Science reporting is pretty crappy especially from mainstream outlets..
 
2020-07-11 12:26:48 AM  

RyansPrivates: dericwater: 200C is 392F. That's oven temperature. You'll sear your lungs breathing that.

Sounds like, "Hey, I know how to kill the coronavirus! Two bullets to the back of the head of every carrier!"

Yeah. I'm betting this article some vast over simplification what is actually happening. Since is it superporous it probably is able to heat very quickly locally without much energy or real temperature increase in the air. It also is probably able to move air through quickly as well.

Science reporting is pretty crappy especially from mainstream outlets..


Did we read the same article? Or maybe you didn't read it at all. It's not referring to masks, but a heated filter inside existing mechanical equipment (air handling units / makeup air units). This makes a lot of sense if it works and has nothing to do with masks.

Or maybe I'm tired and need to go to bed?
 
2020-07-11 12:45:06 AM  

Driver: syrynxx: Please make a face mask out of it.  Especially shaped like a Darth Vader helmet that makes me sound like James Earl Jones.

Wearing a mask that heats to 200°C may not be a good idea.

/ 392°F


Rub some cookie dough on it before donning it.
 
2020-07-11 12:45:45 AM  

dericwater: 200C is 392F. That's oven temperature. You'll sear your lungs breathing that.

Sounds like, "Hey, I know how to kill the coronavirus! Two bullets to the back of the head of every carrier!"


I'm intrigued by your ideas and would like to subscribe to you bullet-of-the-month club.
 
2020-07-11 12:51:54 AM  

slantsix: RyansPrivates: dericwater: 200C is 392F. That's oven temperature. You'll sear your lungs breathing that.

Sounds like, "Hey, I know how to kill the coronavirus! Two bullets to the back of the head of every carrier!"

Yeah. I'm betting this article some vast over simplification what is actually happening. Since is it superporous it probably is able to heat very quickly locally without much energy or real temperature increase in the air. It also is probably able to move air through quickly as well.

Science reporting is pretty crappy especially from mainstream outlets..

Did we read the same article? Or maybe you didn't read it at all. It's not referring to masks, but a heated filter inside existing mechanical equipment (air handling units / makeup air units). This makes a lot of sense if it works and has nothing to do with masks.

Or maybe I'm tired and need to go to bed?


Yes, it's a filter within some HVAC system. Which means you'll be pouring out 200C degree temperature air, which then has to be cooled down to a reasonable 68F (20C). And this does nothing for exterior gatherings. Imagine a bar or restaurant that can afford the energy bill to cool down air from 200C to 20C, with enough air to clear the dining area once every 15 minutes or so. Luckily, for a restaurant, they have a heating element (the stoves and ovens, if they have them) that can do the heating, but they probably don't have the cooling. And you need to still move the air quickly because you'll have people come in, sit, breathe on each other way before that air if fully circulated out.

But really, if you can move the air that quickly, why not just move it out of the room altogether? And would that involve a mini vortex of gusty air within the room in order to move air that quickly?

Basically, it's not a solution at all because the transmission is between humans who are not wearing masks. If we're within 4 feet of each other, without masks, then the only way to blow the exhalations of the people away from each other is with a gust of air powerful enough to make talking to each other close to impossible. And that does nothing to where the particulates are going.

The solution is still masks.
 
2020-07-11 12:53:46 AM  
The guy who came up with the idea runs a medical real estate development company.  I'd love a solution the coronavirus, but this looks like a vanity project with no practicality.
 
2020-07-11 1:01:13 AM  
Yeah, I can see a use case for this, but certainly not a solution by itself.
 
2020-07-11 1:06:52 AM  

dericwater: Which means you'll be pouring out 200C degree temperature air, which then has to be cooled down to a reasonable 68F (20C).


Being introduced to us by a local-market TV station does not imbue it with stellar credibility from the git-go, but it sounds interesting enough that I would like to see the energy physics explained at least a little more.

Think of an electric bug-zapper.  It uses high voltage to kill bugs - even blows some of them apart!  Now such a terrifying, electronic insect obliterator must consume Dr Frankenstein levels of power, no?  No.

If the mass of the metal foam filter to be heated is low, then the energy required to heat it may also be low. If it takes just 10 Watts, or even 100W to heat reasonably sized filter element... well AC systems are already working to remove 1000s of BTUs of heat at any given time.  What's another couple hundred Watts between frenemies?
 
2020-07-11 1:06:59 AM  

LowbrowDeluxe: 200 degrees C kills a lot of things.  You'd be surprised.


Centipedes?
 
2020-07-11 1:07:42 AM  
When I see the words "Texas scientists", I picture:
geologelizabeth.files.wordpress.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-11 1:07:47 AM  
1. This article smells like a late-80's infomercial.

2. I bet the thing (if it really works) will cost a screaming arm & a leg to purchase.
 
2020-07-11 1:07:49 AM  

ImpendingCynic: Scientist: "I invented something that solves a bunch of problems, has no drawbacks, and costs almost nothing!"


Americans: "let's kill him patent it and drive up the price to astronomic levels"
 
2020-07-11 1:08:20 AM  

Chromium_One: Yeah, I can see a use case for this, but certainly not a solution by itself.


Be very careful what solutions you bring around electricity.  Ionic solutions plus electrons under pressure can be disasterous!
 
2020-07-11 1:15:57 AM  

Chromium_One: Yeah, I can see a use case for this, but certainly not a solution by itself.


I'm actually having trouble identifying a use case involving HVAC systems that a powerful UV lamp isn't already doing with 100 year old technology and at a reasonable cost.
 
2020-07-11 1:24:11 AM  

Sliding Carp: "Let's say 70 degrees. It may take 10-20 minutes to kill. If you go to 100, it will take a couple minutes. But if you go to 200, that will be instantaneous," Dr. Ren explains.
That's the temperature scientists decided to stick with, using it to heat a filter made of nickel foam, which is more porous and allows the air to pass.
"It filters the virus. It catches it. It kills it. Without impacting the temperature of the ambient air," says Dr. Garrett K. Peel of Medistar.

In THIS house, we obey the laws of thermodynamics.


Use a peltier module to heat the nickle foam and cool a secondary heat exchange and it should balance out. Pass over the hot nickle foam and then over the cooler.

For those who don't know, a peltier module is like an electric heat pump. Apply a charge and one side of the device heats up while the other cools. The advantage here is that it would trivially seem that whatever heat gets transferred from from the hot side to the air can probably be extracted from the cool side for the "without impacting the temperature of the ambient air" effect.
 
2020-07-11 1:39:07 AM  

slantsix: RyansPrivates: dericwater: 200C is 392F. That's oven temperature. You'll sear your lungs breathing that.

Sounds like, "Hey, I know how to kill the coronavirus! Two bullets to the back of the head of every carrier!"

Yeah. I'm betting this article some vast over simplification what is actually happening. Since is it superporous it probably is able to heat very quickly locally without much energy or real temperature increase in the air. It also is probably able to move air through quickly as well.

Science reporting is pretty crappy especially from mainstream outlets..

Did we read the same article? Or maybe you didn't read it at all. It's not referring to masks, but a heated filter inside existing mechanical equipment (air handling units / makeup air units). This makes a lot of sense if it works and has nothing to do with masks.

Or maybe I'm tired and need to go to bed?


Where did i mention masks? I was stating that the article probably simplifying the process. It obviously isn't meant for mask (even talks about retrofitting HVAC to use this new filter)
 
2020-07-11 1:42:18 AM  
Well, the biggest problem is that airborne transmission is very low for coronavirus, its main mode of spread is via respiratory droplet, so unless you're exhaling directly into an air intake, it's not going to do much.  Respiratory droplets wouldn't make it through any building's air ducts.  This fancy filtration is only going to help if you put it directly between people.
 
2020-07-11 1:45:24 AM  

dericwater: slantsix: RyansPrivates: dericwater: 200C is 392F. That's oven temperature. You'll sear your lungs breathing that.

Sounds like, "Hey, I know how to kill the coronavirus! Two bullets to the back of the head of every carrier!"

Yeah. I'm betting this article some vast over simplification what is actually happening. Since is it superporous it probably is able to heat very quickly locally without much energy or real temperature increase in the air. It also is probably able to move air through quickly as well.

Science reporting is pretty crappy especially from mainstream outlets..

Did we read the same article? Or maybe you didn't read it at all. It's not referring to masks, but a heated filter inside existing mechanical equipment (air handling units / makeup air units). This makes a lot of sense if it works and has nothing to do with masks.

Or maybe I'm tired and need to go to bed?

Yes, it's a filter within some HVAC system. Which means you'll be pouring out 200C degree temperature air, which then has to be cooled down to a reasonable 68F (20C). And this does nothing for exterior gatherings. Imagine a bar or restaurant that can afford the energy bill to cool down air from 200C to 20C, with enough air to clear the dining area once every 15 minutes or so. Luckily, for a restaurant, they have a heating element (the stoves and ovens, if they have them) that can do the heating, but they probably don't have the cooling. And you need to still move the air quickly because you'll have people come in, sit, breathe on each other way before that air if fully circulated out.

But really, if you can move the air that quickly, why not just move it out of the room altogether? And would that involve a mini vortex of gusty air within the room in order to move air that quickly?

Basically, it's not a solution at all because the transmission is between humans who are not wearing masks. If we're within 4 feet of each other, without masks, then the only way to blow the exhalations of the ...


I think the article isn't really telling us very well what it is doing. I could see it used for areas where you have a lot of people in enclosed space and masks aren't feasible and/or as an adjunct. One place would be nursing homes, memory care facilities, etc.

The temperature thing is the dead give away for me: your not going to have something that heats up to 200c unless it is EXTREMELY localized, as in within the mesh/superfoam itself and doesn't impart that heat to the air. Anything beyond that and you could end up creating a bigger problem.
 
2020-07-11 2:21:58 AM  

koder: One of its uses, he suggests, could be in classrooms as Texas students are slated to head back this fall. A mobile unit would be able to filter the air in each room, helping provide a different kind of mask for kids, teachers and staff.

You're not helping.


They're not trying to help; they're trying to get a lucrative government contract.

Unless it can clean something like ~150,000 liters of air per minute, this HVAC system won't work fast enough to prevent any spread in a classroom.
 
2020-07-11 3:22:10 AM  

emtwo: koder: One of its uses, he suggests, could be in classrooms as Texas students are slated to head back this fall. A mobile unit would be able to filter the air in each room, helping provide a different kind of mask for kids, teachers and staff.

You're not helping.

They're not trying to help; they're trying to get a lucrative government contract.

Unless it can clean something like ~150,000 liters of air per minute, this HVAC system won't work fast enough to prevent any spread in a classroom.


Well, he did say it kills instantly, so, a lot of liters per minute? Of course this would cool it down, and heat the room, so you'd need it to run it hotter, with more power, and have a bunch of air conditioners... I'm going to say... Two hundred conditioners, a nuclear reactor, and a liquid salt filter? Forget masks, get those kids some welding goggles. COVID will be the least of their worries!
 
2020-07-11 3:27:13 AM  

syrynxx: Please make a face mask out of it.  Especially shaped like a Darth Vader helmet that makes me sound like James Earl Jones.


Early prototype:

vignette.wikia.nocookie.netView Full Size


Makes you sound like mmmf mff mufh....
 
2020-07-11 3:43:53 AM  

SansNeural: Chromium_One: Yeah, I can see a use case for this, but certainly not a solution by itself.

I'm actually having trouble identifying a use case involving HVAC systems that a powerful UV lamp isn't already doing with 100 year old technology and at a reasonable cost.


Nobody believes that will work because the republican party trump and coronavirus EXTREME! Covid-19! Mask up!!!
 
2020-07-11 4:44:46 AM  

dericwater: 200C is 392F. That's oven temperature. You'll sear your lungs breathing that.

Sounds like, "Hey, I know how to kill the coronavirus! Two bullets to the back of the head of every carrier!"


Fark user imageView Full Size


yeah, I know the show went off the rails shortly after this arc  ...
 
2020-07-11 5:08:03 AM  

SansNeural: Driver: syrynxx: Please make a face mask out of it.  Especially shaped like a Darth Vader helmet that makes me sound like James Earl Jones.

Wearing a mask that heats to 200°C may not be a good idea.

/ 392°F

Rub some cookie dough on it before donning it.


Solutioned!
 
2020-07-11 5:30:55 AM  

Sum Dum Gai: Well, the biggest problem is that airborne transmission is very low for coronavirus, its main mode of spread is via respiratory droplet, so unless you're exhaling directly into an air intake, it's not going to do much.  Respiratory droplets wouldn't make it through any building's air ducts.  This fancy filtration is only going to help if you put it directly between people.


This right here:that drawing about restaurant seating? The one that showed how all those people got sick?  All those people were in the air flow path from the ac unit.  So unless you have some way to keep everyone's exhalations from becoming anyone's inhalations...

This 'invention' may help mitigate, but so would taking 100% outside air.
 
2020-07-11 5:42:53 AM  

RyansPrivates: Since is it superporous it probably is able to heat very quickly locally without much energy or real temperature increase in the air.


It has to heat all the air to 200 C or it isn't going to do any good.
 
2020-07-11 6:10:10 AM  

dericwater: Yes, it's a filter within some HVAC system. Which means you'll be pouring out 200C degree temperature air, which then has to be cooled down to a reasonable 68F (20C).


It's probably not quite that bad.  What they appear to have done is designed a metal filter with pore characteristics that cause particles the size of a virus to come into contact with the mesh, which if the mesh is 200C will destroy the integrity of the virus even with a very small contact time.

You'll be heating the air as well, but nowhere near enough to get it to 200C.  Air's component molecules are, obviously, significantly smaller than a virus and most of it will pass through the mesh without direct contact.

"Without affecting the temperature of the surrounding air" is pretty clearly marketing bullshiat, but probably you're going to be re-cooling the air coming out of the filter from something like 40 or 50C, not 200C.

Basically, it passes the smell test as far as the concept goes.  What doesn't is that whole "cheap to manufacture" thing.  The fact that they're only talking about manufacturing costs and not maintenance and energy costs or replacement frequency is a big red flag that those costs are probably farking massive.  Basically you're running a space heater 24/7 and require all the extra space needed to make that safe, all the electricity to keep it going, and so on.

I don't think this is a scam, essentially, the product is probably real and workable, I just don't think it's a solution, either.  I've worked with similar equipment in the past where there are heated elements you have to maintain at controlled temperatures long-term and that's not cheap.
 
2020-07-11 6:29:21 AM  
If rather than heating things to oven temperatures, they just electrified the metal foam stuff enough to ionize the air, would that also be enough to kill the virus?
 
2020-07-11 6:56:41 AM  

SansNeural: Chromium_One: Yeah, I can see a use case for this, but certainly not a solution by itself.

I'm actually having trouble identifying a use case involving HVAC systems that a powerful UV lamp isn't already doing with 100 year old technology and at a reasonable cost.


Yup. I've already got UV lamps in the systems in my house, and have for years. Whats this gonna do that that won't?
 
2020-07-11 7:57:08 AM  

Nosatril: LowbrowDeluxe: 200 degrees C kills a lot of things.  You'd be surprised.

Centipedes?


It's more likely than you think.
 
2020-07-11 8:23:20 AM  

iron de havilland: Nosatril: LowbrowDeluxe: 200 degrees C kills a lot of things.  You'd be surprised.

Centipedes?

It's more likely than you think.


Curling iron goes where?
 
2020-07-11 11:37:16 AM  
The testing was done here in Texas

Which explains who the number of cases magically went to zero.
 
2020-07-11 12:49:58 PM  

LowbrowDeluxe: 200 degrees C kills a lot of things.  You'd be surprised.


If I'm a bored kid with access to paper towels/toilet paper/notepad paper and I'm aware there's an air duct with a 450 degree heating element nearby...

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-11 12:51:49 PM  

RyansPrivates: dericwater: 200C is 392F. That's oven temperature. You'll sear your lungs breathing that.

Sounds like, "Hey, I know how to kill the coronavirus! Two bullets to the back of the head of every carrier!"

Yeah. I'm betting this article some vast over simplification what is actually happening. Since is it superporous it probably is able to heat very quickly locally without much energy or real temperature increase in the air. It also is probably able to move air through quickly as well.

Science reporting is pretty crappy especially from mainstream outlets..


Question: what are the heating characteristics of air molecules -vs- virus particles? IOW, which heats quicker, and by how much?

Also, it seems to me that someone could devise a honeypot setup for virus particles. In nanobiology and microbiology, everything is about the geometry of the surfaces of molecules. The geometry of the shapes is what fuels chemical reactions. These C-19 viruses are attracted to the shapes of ACE-2 receptors. Why can't the biological architecture (the shape of the molecules) be copied into a heated surface? Or is this too much of a simplification?
 
2020-07-11 1:01:43 PM  
Passing the room air through a curved tube, possibly a series of loops, that has the heated material on the outside of the curve (not the outside of the tube) might work. The virus particles, being heavier, would strike the heated surface and be destroyed but most of the air molecules would not. This would only slightly raise the temperature of the exiting air/
 
2020-07-11 1:07:17 PM  

Harlee: RyansPrivates: dericwater: 200C is 392F. That's oven temperature. You'll sear your lungs breathing that.

Sounds like, "Hey, I know how to kill the coronavirus! Two bullets to the back of the head of every carrier!"

Yeah. I'm betting this article some vast over simplification what is actually happening. Since is it superporous it probably is able to heat very quickly locally without much energy or real temperature increase in the air. It also is probably able to move air through quickly as well.

Science reporting is pretty crappy especially from mainstream outlets..

Question: what are the heating characteristics of air molecules -vs- virus particles? IOW, which heats quicker, and by how much?

Also, it seems to me that someone could devise a honeypot setup for virus particles. In nanobiology and microbiology, everything is about the geometry of the surfaces of molecules. The geometry of the shapes is what fuels chemical reactions. These C-19 viruses are attracted to the shapes of ACE-2 receptors. Why can't the biological architecture (the shape of the molecules) be copied into a heated surface? Or is this too much of a simplification?


Well, it wouldn't really be necessary.  Covid-19 virus particles can't survive in bare atmosphere anyway.  They exist inside tiny droplets of water, so if you want to trap them, you'd use a hydrophilic surface that would adsorb water.

But the bigger problem is that, as I mentioned earlier, COVID passing all the way through any HVAC system and coming out with recirculated air seems very unlikely, because the respiratory droplets are fairly heavy and tend to settle on surfaces rather than remaining airborne for long periods of time.  And to remove that risk entirely, a standard HEPA filter is probably just as good as any specialized filter.
 
2020-07-11 1:09:26 PM  

Jim_Callahan: dericwater: Yes, it's a filter within some HVAC system. Which means you'll be pouring out 200C degree temperature air, which then has to be cooled down to a reasonable 68F (20C).

It's probably not quite that bad.  What they appear to have done is designed a metal filter with pore characteristics that cause particles the size of a virus to come into contact with the mesh, which if the mesh is 200C will destroy the integrity of the virus even with a very small contact time.

You'll be heating the air as well, but nowhere near enough to get it to 200C.  Air's component molecules are, obviously, significantly smaller than a virus and most of it will pass through the mesh without direct contact.

"Without affecting the temperature of the surrounding air" is pretty clearly marketing bullshiat, but probably you're going to be re-cooling the air coming out of the filter from something like 40 or 50C, not 200C.

Basically, it passes the smell test as far as the concept goes.  What doesn't is that whole "cheap to manufacture" thing.  The fact that they're only talking about manufacturing costs and not maintenance and energy costs or replacement frequency is a big red flag that those costs are probably farking massive.  Basically you're running a space heater 24/7 and require all the extra space needed to make that safe, all the electricity to keep it going, and so on.

I don't think this is a scam, essentially, the product is probably real and workable, I just don't think it's a solution, either.  I've worked with similar equipment in the past where there are heated elements you have to maintain at controlled temperatures long-term and that's not cheap.


Kudos
One the best explanations
And understanding of "Total Cost of Ownership"

Basically, they need to make it practical
And it still would have to be distributed and installed in a LOT of places.

Even if successful and not too expensive
It's going to be a long time before it's all over.

Doesn't help us now...
Nor in the next some months
 
2020-07-11 1:22:56 PM  

Sum Dum Gai: Harlee: RyansPrivates: dericwater: 200C is 392F. That's oven temperature. You'll sear your lungs breathing that.

Sounds like, "Hey, I know how to kill the coronavirus! Two bullets to the back of the head of every carrier!"

Yeah. I'm betting this article some vast over simplification what is actually happening. Since is it superporous it probably is able to heat very quickly locally without much energy or real temperature increase in the air. It also is probably able to move air through quickly as well.

Science reporting is pretty crappy especially from mainstream outlets..

Question: what are the heating characteristics of air molecules -vs- virus particles? IOW, which heats quicker, and by how much?

Also, it seems to me that someone could devise a honeypot setup for virus particles. In nanobiology and microbiology, everything is about the geometry of the surfaces of molecules. The geometry of the shapes is what fuels chemical reactions. These C-19 viruses are attracted to the shapes of ACE-2 receptors. Why can't the biological architecture (the shape of the molecules) be copied into a heated surface? Or is this too much of a simplification?

Well, it wouldn't really be necessary.  Covid-19 virus particles can't survive in bare atmosphere anyway.  They exist inside tiny droplets of water, so if you want to trap them, you'd use a hydrophilic surface that would adsorb water.

But the bigger problem is that, as I mentioned earlier, COVID passing all the way through any HVAC system and coming out with recirculated air seems very unlikely, because the respiratory droplets are fairly heavy and tend to settle on surfaces rather than remaining airborne for long periods of time.  And to remove that risk entirely, a standard HEPA filter is probably just as good as any specialized filter.


Thats a good point. What Im curious about is porosity. Is this solution more porous and maintenance free vs a HEPA filter? That seems to me to be the only reason for this over HEPA
 
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