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(Some Guy)   An in-depth graphical analysis of women's tops sold on goodwill's website. TL/DR, even goodwill stuff is more expensive in California   (goodwill.awardwinninghuman.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Data, Brand, high-price items, Goodwill Industries, Brand management, Goodwill's website, Median, Charity shop  
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755 clicks; posted to Geek » on 08 Jul 2020 at 9:28 PM (10 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-08 9:35:24 PM  
I am more confused after reading the article than before. The author repeatedly tells us that their data is bad. But I still don't understand what their questions are. Or what they think their analysis of their data is supposed to reveal, or what the significance might be.

It seems like a nice abject lesson in incompetence and irrelevance.

As background, there are some good questions about if life is harder for women than men. Perhaps that involves something about how expensive it is for women versus men to dress themselves in "appropriate" ways. But that is confounded by what it means to dress yourself in appropriate ways.

If you're shopping at thrift stores for your wardrobe, face it, you're working in from the fringe. That's not bad but it ain't representative. Power to you if you are shopping at Goodwill and developing your "professional" wardrobe. But what the heck does that even mean?

Are you trying to get a job at a fortune 500 company with a Good will wardrobe from money you got working at McDs? Well damn child, you're a talented person already to be juggling those balls. And you can pull it off and go far once the blocks click into place. Seriously, you've figured out how to work what's in front of you and it will be recognized.

But if you're hung up on thinking about the inequities and parsing if a blouse costs 20% more in California than in Missouri you've lost your focus. This level of navel gazing confounded by obtuse obsession with "fashion" is self-destructive.
 
2020-07-08 9:43:21 PM  
Meh.  Goodwill as last resort.  Find a good thrift shop that you like and is dependable on prices and quality and keep it a secret so it doesn't get 'shopped out' too fast.  The golden days of thrift shopping are gone.
 
2020-07-08 9:50:53 PM  

Billy Liar: Meh.  Goodwill as last resort.  Find a good thrift shop that you like and is dependable on prices and quality and keep it a secret so it doesn't get 'shopped out' too fast.  The golden days of thrift shopping are gone.


I'm sure the thrift shops are flooded with middlemen who snag all the good deals and resell for more online
 
2020-07-08 10:04:19 PM  
I haven't read the article but I have no interest in op shopping anymore since they discovered the internet.

*op shop gets given free stuff*
"These are selling used on TradeMe for $800, so I'll set the price at $800"
*doesn't sell anything, asks for donations because their revenue is down*

They used to do much better turning over massive quantities of stock at random prices because COGS was zero. Now they're hanging onto everything hoping for market price, but market price operates on a need basis in front of a massive audience, not an impulse basis for whoever just happens to be walking through your shop at the time.

Now I've heard stories of them being told someone has a pile of shiat to donate after moving into a smaller house, or dying, then them turning up, picking and choosing only the best things and leaving the rest for the donator to discover when their old landlord calls them angrily.

They've just become greedy and everyone is worse off because of it.
 
2020-07-08 10:21:22 PM  

dyhchong: I haven't read the article but I have no interest in op shopping anymore since they discovered the internet.

*op shop gets given free stuff*
"These are selling used on TradeMe for $800, so I'll set the price at $800"
*doesn't sell anything, asks for donations because their revenue is down*

They used to do much better turning over massive quantities of stock at random prices because COGS was zero. Now they're hanging onto everything hoping for market price, but market price operates on a need basis in front of a massive audience, not an impulse basis for whoever just happens to be walking through your shop at the time.

Now I've heard stories of them being told someone has a pile of shiat to donate after moving into a smaller house, or dying, then them turning up, picking and choosing only the best things and leaving the rest for the donator to discover when their old landlord calls them angrily.

They've just become greedy and everyone is worse off because of it.


When we cleaned out my mom's house, getting the furniture gone was the main thing, so we donated it to a local thrift shop.  It was all in really good condition, and it was a college town, so we were sure they could sell it without a problem.  Their stuff was all priced to sell, so we felt pretty good about it.  A real win-win on that one.
 
2020-07-08 10:31:50 PM  
Billy Liar:
When we cleaned out my mom's house, getting the furniture gone was the main thing, so we donated it to a local thrift shop.  It was all in really good condition, and it was a college town, so we were sure they could sell it without a problem.  Their stuff was all priced to sell, so we felt pretty good about it.  A real win-win on that one.

Good on you.
 
2020-07-08 10:38:21 PM  
Used to be that Goody and the Sally had plenty of funky period type clothes you could go to for cheap costuming... no more.  It's like everything that didn't fit the "utilitarian clothing for poor people" metric had been trashed or maybe skimmed out by smaller, fashion-oriented thrift sellers.
 
2020-07-09 8:26:51 AM  

Any Pie Left: Used to be that Goody and the Sally had plenty of funky period type clothes you could go to for cheap costuming... no more.  It's like everything that didn't fit the "utilitarian clothing for poor people" metric had been trashed or maybe skimmed out by smaller, fashion-oriented thrift sellers.


I think either the turnover rate is a lot faster than it used to be or that period (vintage) clothing has seen its day.  You used to be able to depend on older people wearing good quality, substantial clothing to go out in, so there were nice suits and dresses - distinct but not flashy....You won't see the old dears dressed up to go out on the town anymore, they're all togged up in Nike sweats and shoes like millions of other people.  I mean, jeez, the department stores used to put their tags in the clothes, proud of the stuff they sold.  Now there's no reason to - you could buy it at one of the chain department stores or at a swap meet, it's the same product.  You're right, you probably have to go to vintage shops for anything older than, say, the '70s.
 
2020-07-09 9:26:51 AM  
If they want more business they should advertise "Women's tops half off"
 
2020-07-09 10:22:44 AM  
Umm remember that Goodwill has a website and various retail offerings.  Specifically online 

Billy Liar: Any Pie Left: Used to be that Goody and the Sally had plenty of funky period type clothes you could go to for cheap costuming... no more.  It's like everything that didn't fit the "utilitarian clothing for poor people" metric had been trashed or maybe skimmed out by smaller, fashion-oriented thrift sellers.

I think either the turnover rate is a lot faster than it used to be or that period (vintage) clothing has seen its day.  You used to be able to depend on older people wearing good quality, substantial clothing to go out in, so there were nice suits and dresses - distinct but not flashy....You won't see the old dears dressed up to go out on the town anymore, they're all togged up in Nike sweats and shoes like millions of other people.  I mean, jeez, the department stores used to put their tags in the clothes, proud of the stuff they sold.  Now there's no reason to - you could buy it at one of the chain department stores or at a swap meet, it's the same product.  You're right, you probably have to go to vintage shops for anything older than, say, the '70s.


Well that and the pipeline for clothes has changed.  There are now multiple orgs that will collect clothing for free and sort through it to resell on line or through their own networks.

There is so much less slack in the system of the used clothing market.  After Nastygal and Goodwill/Salvation army went online to a centralized sorting/resell model the brick and mortar stores aren't going to be holding onto valuable clothes and will just resell them to clear their inventory.
 
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