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(YouTube)   Usually, a door does not become part of the flight control surfaces on a light aircraft. Usually. Skip to 3:45 for the pucker factor nine action   (youtube.com) divider line
    More: Scary  
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5323 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Jul 2020 at 12:30 AM (12 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-07 9:38:42 PM  
Are those porta-potties in the background where they landed ?
If so, this landing strip must get a LOT of scary landings.
 
2020-07-07 10:14:27 PM  
And THAT is why I like the Mooney push rod controls.  If that were a cable system I don't think that he could have saved it.  It also helps that he could trim the entire tail rather than just a trim tab on the elevator.

I imagine that they didn't lock the back door and the latch opened.  Just my two cents.

/A&P
//Anyone can land an airplane once.  What matters is being able to do it more than once.
///Three is the rule.
 
2020-07-08 12:42:38 AM  
If anyone can do it once, I like my chances. I cant see being in a situation where I need to do it more than once.
 
2020-07-08 12:42:41 AM  
Huh...  I didn't realize that it was possible to leave skidmarks like that with a grass landing....

Hopefully they packed some spare pants....
 
2020-07-08 1:05:43 AM  
The propeller on the front is basically just a fan to keep the pilot cool.  If it stops, he'll start sweating.
 
2020-07-08 1:13:03 AM  
Wow, GA aircraft are scary enough when they're operating normally, having bits fall off and embed themselves is other critical bits is definitely NOT something I'd ever want to experience. I have to say the better half handled that extremely well.
 
2020-07-08 1:13:55 AM  

CJHardin: And THAT is why I like the Mooney push rod controls.  If that were a cable system I don't think that he could have saved it.  It also helps that he could trim the entire tail rather than just a trim tab on the elevator.

I imagine that they didn't lock the back door and the latch opened.  Just my two cents.

/A&P
//Anyone can land an airplane once.  What matters is being able to do it more than once.
///Three is the rule.


Couple questions:
1) does the baggage door open against the slip stream in that aircraft? I'll take your word it's a Mooney having never been in one. Or did it just work loose?

2) what do you mean by trim the tail and not just the elevator?

I fly Cessnas and a Tiger (club aircraft)
 
2020-07-08 1:16:46 AM  
Had a scary moment or 2 at KMTV in February, engine failure on take off.
Turned out to be a very loose arm in the electric fuel pump. Just worn out.

Had about 900' to work with, so made it back to the runway. Parked the aircraft and sauntered back to the FBO like nothing happened.

J/K, I was a mess. Replaced fuel pump and carburetor too for good measure.
 
2020-07-08 1:18:47 AM  

powhound: CJHardin: And THAT is why I like the Mooney push rod controls.  If that were a cable system I don't think that he could have saved it.  It also helps that he could trim the entire tail rather than just a trim tab on the elevator.

I imagine that they didn't lock the back door and the latch opened.  Just my two cents.

/A&P
//Anyone can land an airplane once.  What matters is being able to do it more than once.
///Three is the rule.

Couple questions:
1) does the baggage door open against the slip stream in that aircraft? I'll take your word it's a Mooney having never been in one. Or did it just work loose?

2) what do you mean by trim the tail and not just the elevator?

I fly Cessnas and a Tiger (club aircraft)


Not entirely certain, but a cargo door should open just by Bernoulli pressure because of your airspeed. Assuming it's not locked into place.

/just watched a Lestrer Holt Air Disasters thing
//a Boeing lost part of the deck because the cargo door flew open over the Atlantic
///I don't care what the NTSB said, it was an engineering farkup because the hinges should have failed and let the door fly off
 
2020-07-08 1:23:04 AM  

powhound: CJHardin: And THAT is why I like the Mooney push rod controls.  If that were a cable system I don't think that he could have saved it.  It also helps that he could trim the entire tail rather than just a trim tab on the elevator.

I imagine that they didn't lock the back door and the latch opened.  Just my two cents.

/A&P
//Anyone can land an airplane once.  What matters is being able to do it more than once.
///Three is the rule.

Couple questions:
1) does the baggage door open against the slip stream in that aircraft? I'll take your word it's a Mooney having never been in one. Or did it just work loose?

2) what do you mean by trim the tail and not just the elevator?

I fly Cessnas and a Tiger (club aircraft)


I drive PA32's, somewhat similar to the Mooneys.

1) Yes, if the baggage door becomes unlocked, the static pressure inside the compartment will pop the door open.  It's fairly common, unfortunately.  What's unusual is that the entire piano hinge failed and let the door rip entirely off of the frame.

2) https://www.aopa.org/news-and-medi​a/al​l-news/1999/april/flight-training-maga​zine/no-dumb-questions-stabilators-v-e​levators
 
2020-07-08 1:25:35 AM  
He came into that field awfully hot.
 
2020-07-08 1:28:35 AM  
Those were some nerves of steel, I've been in some shiat, but idk what I wouldve done in that situation.
 
2020-07-08 1:31:17 AM  
Normally, when you lose part of an airplane while flying, it goes away.

Every now and then, you know exactly where that part ended up, because it tries to kill you.
 
2020-07-08 1:34:54 AM  

Driver: Are those porta-potties in the background where they landed ?
If so, this landing strip must get a LOT of scary landings.


Yes. "It's a sea of portable loos"; a comment from the passenger.
 
2020-07-08 1:55:00 AM  

Lee in Texas: Driver: Are those porta-potties in the background where they landed ?
If so, this landing strip must get a LOT of scary landings.

Yes. "It's a sea of portable loos"; a comment from the passenger.


My assumption is the field is now used for summer festivals and the porta loos are there for those, though that does beg the question of do they keep them there year round or did someone really haul them out there after the thaw thinking that concerts were going to be held this year?
 
2020-07-08 2:03:16 AM  

The more you eat the more you fart: He came into that field awfully hot.


I have no idea what having a door embedded in your empennage will do to your stall speed, and I am guessing he didn't either. I doubt it improves stall characteristics. Hot was probably a very prudent choice.
 
2020-07-08 2:08:26 AM  
Just watched the video in its entirety. Good job OP maintaining situation awareness. Not entirely sure why you chose a field as a runway, but that is pilot's discretion and I will yield to it.

Good job on the landing!
 
2020-07-08 2:09:15 AM  
Is "buffer" the same as "buffet?"

Is "sheered" the same as "sheared?"

Is "up" the same as "down?"

Is a photo of where the hatch should have been a part of the narrative?
 
2020-07-08 2:11:45 AM  

Dryad: The more you eat the more you fart: He came into that field awfully hot.

I have no idea what having a door embedded in your empennage will do to your stall speed, and I am guessing he didn't either. I doubt it improves stall characteristics. Hot was probably a very prudent choice.


Yeah you could hear the stall horn at times, or what I assume was the stall horn. He was keeping airspeed above the warning indicator. Great airmanship. He landed. Bounced across at least one paved area and when slowed turned onto another paved strip. That's a textbook emergency landing.
 
2020-07-08 2:14:03 AM  

Dryad: The more you eat the more you fart: He came into that field awfully hot.

I have no idea what having a door embedded in your empennage will do to your stall speed, and I am guessing he didn't either. I doubt it improves stall characteristics. Hot was probably a very prudent choice.


120 knots as opposed to 130? It may have been higher, and the airframe may become unbalanced due to the irregular dynamics.

Honestly he should have landed at an airport, but got really lucky the field didn't cave in and tumped them head over heels.

/tump: to thro head over heels
 
2020-07-08 2:25:44 AM  
Bet they had awesome stil-alive sex after.

/Trim
//Tail
///Shirley
 
2020-07-08 2:33:28 AM  

Stibium: Dryad: The more you eat the more you fart: He came into that field awfully hot.

I have no idea what having a door embedded in your empennage will do to your stall speed, and I am guessing he didn't either. I doubt it improves stall characteristics. Hot was probably a very prudent choice.

120 knots as opposed to 130? It may have been higher, and the airframe may become unbalanced due to the irregular dynamics.

Honestly he should have landed at an airport, but got really lucky the field didn't cave in and tumped them head over heels.

/tump: to thro head over heels


That's assuming he had control over his altitude which I'm assuming he didn't. Drag factor and all that.
 
2020-07-08 2:33:48 AM  

Stibium: Dryad: The more you eat the more you fart: He came into that field awfully hot.

I have no idea what having a door embedded in your empennage will do to your stall speed, and I am guessing he didn't either. I doubt it improves stall characteristics. Hot was probably a very prudent choice.

120 knots as opposed to 130? It may have been higher, and the airframe may become unbalanced due to the irregular dynamics.

Honestly he should have landed at an airport, but got really lucky the field didn't cave in and tumped them head over heels.

/tump: to thro head over heels


He knew what the dynamics were at THAT speed, and even then it looked like he was having a hell of a time just fighting to keep it level, while likely fighting off a tail stall from the way it pitched there a couple times. The idea of experimenting with how its handling would change at a slower airspeed, and then IF that didn't make him drop out of the sky then trying a high alpha maneuver just seems risky to the point of suicidal.
-
/Though I agree with the flipping, I thought he was never going to get it out of ground effect either. Fully expected him eat dirt there.
 
2020-07-08 2:41:32 AM  

Invalid Litter Dept: Bet they had awesome stil-alive sex after.

/Trim
//Tail
///Shirley


He was pretty cool.  I would've asked for at least a kiss, and more for luck on the way down.
 
2020-07-08 3:12:10 AM  
The line of Turdises likely serves the working airfield. Here's a link to the page showing the field's layout.

The aerial photo of the field provided (blinkingly briefly) at the tail-end of the other vid dates from the Forties, and runway 13 (and the M4) didn't exist then.
 
2020-07-08 3:46:39 AM  
I thought they were going to crash when they hit the road, but there were no fences or drainage ditches and they went right over it.   Wow.
 
2020-07-08 4:20:59 AM  

Dryad: Stibium: Dryad: The more you eat the more you fart: He came into that field awfully hot.

I have no idea what having a door embedded in your empennage will do to your stall speed, and I am guessing he didn't either. I doubt it improves stall characteristics. Hot was probably a very prudent choice.

120 knots as opposed to 130? It may have been higher, and the airframe may become unbalanced due to the irregular dynamics.

Honestly he should have landed at an airport, but got really lucky the field didn't cave in and tumped them head over heels.

/tump: to thro head over heels

He knew what the dynamics were at THAT speed, and even then it looked like he was having a hell of a time just fighting to keep it level, while likely fighting off a tail stall from the way it pitched there a couple times. The idea of experimenting with how its handling would change at a slower airspeed, and then IF that didn't make him drop out of the sky then trying a high alpha maneuver just seems risky to the point of suicidal.
-
/Though I agree with the flipping, I thought he was never going to get it out of ground effect either. Fully expected him eat dirt there.


But those airiel maneuvers would have been adequate; that's why I say he shouldn't have ditched.

I say that without having PIC position in that airframe.

I'm not going to go in to this. A pilot had to belly land and that's that. He determined that it was easier to do it there and not elsewhere, and that was his determination.
 
2020-07-08 4:43:11 AM  
studebaker hoch

I thought they were going to crash when they hit the road, but there were no fences or drainage ditches and they went right over it.   Wow.

That's runways 17/35 (grass) and 16/34 (paved). See above link.
 
2020-07-08 4:45:33 AM  
Stibium

A pilot had to belly land and that's that.

Who belly-landed?
 
2020-07-08 5:23:12 AM  
The lady with him is calm af, too. They scream in that hot, and she just reaches up to hold onto the bar all quiet-like and trusts. The whole thing is wow.
 
Al!
2020-07-08 5:38:03 AM  

Stibium: Dryad: The more you eat the more you fart: He came into that field awfully hot.

I have no idea what having a door embedded in your empennage will do to your stall speed, and I am guessing he didn't either. I doubt it improves stall characteristics. Hot was probably a very prudent choice.

120 knots as opposed to 130? It may have been higher, and the airframe may become unbalanced due to the irregular dynamics.

Honestly he should have landed at an airport, but got really lucky the field didn't cave in and tumped them head over heels.

/tump: to thro head over heels


He says he was losing 300'/minute.  At 15 minutes out and 2100' altitude, maybe he did math and decided the old RAF grass runway, only 770 meters away, was a better choice than whichever spot physics decided on as he tried to reach an airport.  Personally, I think he did an amazing job.  I'm certain there was serious drag on that side, and he said the controls were basically useless.
 
2020-07-08 6:19:31 AM  
I thought YOU said you locked the door.
 
2020-07-08 6:31:07 AM  

Stibium: Just watched the video in its entirety. Good job OP maintaining situation awareness. Not entirely sure why you chose a field as a runway, but that is pilot's discretion and I will yield to it.

Good job on the landing!


GREAT JOB!
(looks like they'll be able to re-use the aircraft)
 
2020-07-08 6:51:35 AM  

Stibium: Dryad: The more you eat the more you fart: He came into that field awfully hot.

I have no idea what having a door embedded in your empennage will do to your stall speed, and I am guessing he didn't either. I doubt it improves stall characteristics. Hot was probably a very prudent choice.

120 knots as opposed to 130? It may have been higher, and the airframe may become unbalanced due to the irregular dynamics.

Honestly he should have landed at an airport, but got really lucky the field didn't cave in and tumped them head over heels.

/tump: to thro head over heels


According to a link further down, that actually was a grass runway. So the ground is probably well packed and graded. Also, there's a comment on the video itself from someone who works at the airstrip he landed at, who is apparently involved in aircraft maintenance and repair, who said that he's inspected the plane and there was considerable damage to the horizontal stabilizer and its control surfaces from the door hitting it.
 
2020-07-08 7:01:35 AM  
Getting a chuckle out of story as my aircraft has no doors. Or roof.
 
2020-07-08 8:52:22 AM  

The more you eat the more you fart: He came into that field awfully hot.


Deliberately so - he had a massive drag source on the tail and was afraid of stalling it. By keeping his speed up, he kept lift and control and was able to set it down. If he'd stalled the tail, he'd pitch down hard and he didn't have enough altitude to risk that.

Tail stalls usually only happen in icing conditions, but you could consider a cargo door to be a strange form of ice.
 
2020-07-08 9:13:49 AM  

Nocrash: Getting a chuckle out of story as my aircraft has no doors. Or roof.


You've been through something like this three times already ???
 
2020-07-08 9:19:17 AM  
Wow...
That's the brits for you, in pure panic resolve...
But seriously, wow dude. The composure and skill on display, well done.
 
2020-07-08 10:53:59 AM  

Stibium: Just watched the video in its entirety. Good job OP maintaining situation awareness. Not entirely sure why you chose a field as a runway, but that is pilot's discretion and I will yield to it.

Good job on the landing!


Paved runwasy are most helpful.
A grass runway is a runway and just as helpful.
A big open field is fairly helpful.

A lot of people figure, he let's just land on a highway. Problems there include vehicles, powerlines, poles and oher things sticking up close to the road, etc.
 
2020-07-08 11:40:58 AM  
Pfft. Mel Gibson landed on a goddamn mountain!
 
2020-07-08 11:51:56 AM  

hammettman: Invalid Litter Dept: Bet they had awesome stil-alive sex after.

/Trim
//Tail
///Shirley

He was pretty cool.  I would've asked for at least a kiss, and more for luck on the way down.


media1.giphy.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-08 11:58:36 AM  
I like the "please subscribe" plea at the end of his note...lol
 
2020-07-08 12:09:36 PM  
Must have landed in Australia.
 
2020-07-08 12:28:58 PM  

edmo: Paved runwasy are most helpful.
A grass runway is a runway and just as helpful.
A big open field is fairly helpful.


Had a pilot of a cropduster set down in the pasture across from my parents' farm house.  He touched down less than 50 yards from their front door, and rolled slightly uphill to a stop.  The engine had blown a fuel line, so he deadsticked the landing.

I was just driving up to the house when I saw it happen.  Parked my car, hopped the fence, and made it to the plane as the pilot was getting out.  He was visibly shaking from the scare & adrenaline rush.  Another 15 seconds of flight, and his only option would have been a water landing into the Kentucky River.

By chance, that year, our neighbor decided to let that pasture go fallow and let the cows roam on it.  Any other year and it would have been full of tobacco.
 
2020-07-08 12:59:40 PM  
Great job by the pilot.  Getting that plane down quickly and in one piece while he could was the best call he could make. A grass field you know is available in front of you is a better option than an airport farther away when your controls are damaged and you are struggling to keep it in the air.
 
2020-07-08 1:41:05 PM  

ByOwlLight: The lady with him is calm af, too. They scream in that hot, and she just reaches up to hold onto the bar all quiet-like and trusts. The whole thing is wow.



I read that as "thrusts".


Twice.
 
2020-07-08 2:04:52 PM  
When they're taxiing at the end she asks "Where are we??"

He missed a perfect opportunity to say "Alive and on the ground".

I see from google maps that particular airfield is really easy to spot because there are a gazillion solar panels on both sides of that 1000m grass runway.

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-08 5:17:29 PM  

Truck Fump: Stibium: Just watched the video in its entirety. Good job OP maintaining situation awareness. Not entirely sure why you chose a field as a runway, but that is pilot's discretion and I will yield to it.

Good job on the landing!

GREAT JOB!
(looks like they'll be able to re-use the aircraft)


Lol.  Brian Shul.  "Any landing you can walk away from is a good landing, and any landing you can reuse the aircraft is a great landing. "

/credit: Brian Shul.  From Butterflies to Blackbirds.I
 
2020-07-08 6:23:56 PM  

powhound: CJHardin: And THAT is why I like the Mooney push rod controls.  If that were a cable system I don't think that he could have saved it.  It also helps that he could trim the entire tail rather than just a trim tab on the elevator.

I imagine that they didn't lock the back door and the latch opened.  Just my two cents.

/A&P
//Anyone can land an airplane once.  What matters is being able to do it more than once.
///Three is the rule.

Couple questions:
1) does the baggage door open against the slip stream in that aircraft? I'll take your word it's a Mooney having never been in one. Or did it just work loose?

2) what do you mean by trim the tail and not just the elevator?

I fly Cessnas and a Tiger (club aircraft)


Sorry 'bout the delay.

1)  The baggage door on a Mooney opens straight up like a gull wing.  With the way it opens in comparison to the fuselage, It would actually create a bit of lift in flight.  It violently opening at speed is, as evidenced here, enough to rip it off.

2)  On a Mooney the entire tail, to include the horizontal and vertical stabalizer, elevator, and rudder, moves as a single unit to trim it.  Essentially the entire tail pivots up and down to trim the airplane rather than just applying counterforce to the control surface like a regular trim tab.
 
2020-07-08 6:30:13 PM  

scott4long: powhound: CJHardin: And THAT is why I like the Mooney push rod controls.  If that were a cable system I don't think that he could have saved it.  It also helps that he could trim the entire tail rather than just a trim tab on the elevator.

I imagine that they didn't lock the back door and the latch opened.  Just my two cents.

/A&P
//Anyone can land an airplane once.  What matters is being able to do it more than once.
///Three is the rule.

Couple questions:
1) does the baggage door open against the slip stream in that aircraft? I'll take your word it's a Mooney having never been in one. Or did it just work loose?

2) what do you mean by trim the tail and not just the elevator?

I fly Cessnas and a Tiger (club aircraft)

I drive PA32's, somewhat similar to the Mooneys.

1) Yes, if the baggage door becomes unlocked, the static pressure inside the compartment will pop the door open.  It's fairly common, unfortunately.  What's unusual is that the entire piano hinge failed and let the door rip entirely off of the frame.

2) https://www.aopa.org/news-and-media​/all-news/1999/april/flight-training-m​agazine/no-dumb-questions-stabilators-​v-elevators


Many Pipers have stabilators but in the case of the Mooney it is a regular elevator on a wholly trimmable tail.  It has a chain driven worm gear drive that moves it up and down.  Blew my mind the first time I saw it.  Runs really smooth with a Garmin GFC 500 autopilot.

/Garmin Dealer
 
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