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(The Drive)   You kids and your GPS Back in my day, we measured our trips with abacus and farthings   (thedrive.com) divider line
    More: Interesting, Automotive navigation system, practical use, Etak Navigator, first turn, GPS systems today, ad-hoc road network, car keep track of its location, new paper maps  
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431 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Jul 2020 at 6:11 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



19 Comments     (+0 »)
 
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2020-07-07 5:46:07 PM  
They used to teach maps in grade school. They still do that?
 
2020-07-07 6:16:31 PM  
Wait until GPS is jammed, nobody is going to know how to use a map and compass any more. If they even have a compass. And the magnetic declination on their old maps is going to be way off.
 
2020-07-07 7:00:08 PM  
So the farthings become nearthings the closer you get?
 
2020-07-07 7:09:55 PM  
Yeah, I was reading about one of these systems awhile back. Absolutely amazing, it would be cool just to own one in working order. Old tech is cool because so much more went I to it than a few chips. I mean, sure, those chips represent the same basic parts, but you now can skip major steps by just buying chips that do one part of the problem and add it them to others. A lot of these things were designed from the ground up, using parts that didn't exist elsewhere.
 
2020-07-07 7:10:29 PM  
<CSB> My dad was involved in the NATO group in El Segundo for GPS Navstar from 84-89 so we moved from our little town of 10,000 outside Ottawa to LA for the 5 years. After we got back we ended up going back down in 91 and drove there and was asked to  try out a Trimble Trimpack (I think that was what it was).
Never got a signal.
</CSB>

<CSB #2 >
For Persian Gulf War 1, Canada got a GPS unit for one of their ships. The sailors were strictly instructed not to play with it. There were stories of US Marines using it to get pizzas delivered by helicopter
</CSB #2>
 
2020-07-07 7:21:27 PM  
What? No inertial navigation like on submarines? I am dissapoint...
 
2020-07-07 7:32:40 PM  
Sextants for the win.
Learn a dying skill, it's fun and it's worth it.
 
2020-07-07 7:35:31 PM  

GaperKiller: Sextants for the win.
Learn a dying skill, it's fun and it's worth it.


Also, it has "sex" in the name.
 
2020-07-07 8:20:55 PM  
James Bond had a GPS in his Aston-Martin DB5

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2020-07-07 8:29:32 PM  
I read that as fartings, and nodded.

Then I re-read the headline.
 
2020-07-07 8:37:44 PM  
My car gets forty does to the hogshead, and that's the way I like it!
 
2020-07-07 8:52:56 PM  

GaperKiller: Sextants for the win.
Learn a dying skill, it's fun and it's worth it.


Couldn't agree more.

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Sextant on the left is a project my father started in 1969, built from scratch out of aluminum and brass.  Needs new mirrors, a brass scale in the window of the arm, and some sunshades.  The one on the right is an inexpensive Davis Mk. 3 sextant.  Great for practicing with, and they're only about $40 new.

BTW, it's actually not a dying art.  The US Navy has started teaching celestial navigation again at Annapolis, and I've seen a number of sailing videos where they use them on long voyages as a backup to GPS.  For example, when Sam Holmes was sailing from Los Angeles to Hawaii solo on his 23 foot sailboat Swedish Fish, he checked his position using a Mk. 3 as a test.

Solo sailing Los Angeles to Hawaii on 23ft boat
Youtube yUi0gsxVHZM
 
2020-07-07 9:07:20 PM  

KarmicDisaster: Wait until GPS is jammed, nobody is going to know how to use a map and compass any more. If they even have a compass. And the magnetic declination on their old maps is going to be way off.


Not far enough to matter.

Plus, I've got maps and compasses and I know how to use them.  I even keep paper maps in my car.
 
2020-07-07 9:39:46 PM  

GaperKiller: Sextants for the win.
Learn a dying skill, it's fun and it's worth it.


No it's not
 
2020-07-07 10:21:42 PM  

chitownmike: GaperKiller: Sextants for the win.
Learn a dying skill, it's fun and it's worth it.

No it's not


Yes, yes it is.

It's an excellent way to figure out where you are without any outside information, but setting that aside, it's also a bit of fun math and astronomy.
 
2020-07-07 10:28:14 PM  

Ruthven13: What? No inertial navigation like on submarines? I am dissapoint...


The last one on the list, the Etak Navigator, is an inertial system.

About a year ago I came across a book on cartographic theory at my library from about 1985 that was talking about the Navigator as it just came out and how it was the direction of the future.  Even at that time automakers were already deep into research regarding in-dash display screens for car navigation, and with the recent decision to allow civilian access to GPS, on-person navigation wouldn't be too much later.  As with generally all tech predictions it was a little optimistic in it's timeline but it was rather interesting that in the mid 80's there was already the vision for it,
 
2020-07-07 10:31:43 PM  

Mindlock: Ruthven13: What? No inertial navigation like on submarines? I am dissapoint...

The last one on the list, the Etak Navigator, is an inertial system.

About a year ago I came across a book on cartographic theory at my library from about 1985 that was talking about the Navigator as it just came out and how it was the direction of the future.  Even at that time automakers were already deep into research regarding in-dash display screens for car navigation, and with the recent decision to allow civilian access to GPS, on-person navigation wouldn't be too much later.  As with generally all tech predictions it was a little optimistic in it's timeline but it was rather interesting that in the mid 80's there was already the vision for it,


Every one of those was ahead of its time. Hell, that first one was pure genius for the day. But that Etak thing was so good that Tom Tom bought them and was able to leverage their maps, 20 years after the thing was designed. That's farking impressive, considering just how much happened in that timeframe.
 
2020-07-08 4:22:44 AM  
Furlongs?
 
2020-07-08 7:07:50 AM  

red5ish: Furlongs?


Could be worse.  Could be shorthairs.
 
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