Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(WTOP)   Months of 24/7 work from home parenting have led to the realization that open floor plans, where the only privacy is in your bathroom, don't work in the Covid-19 work world   (wtop.com) divider line
    More: Obvious, United States Census Bureau, Technical drawing, Home, Vice President of the United States, Floor plan, cable TV home design shows, Sales of new homes, potential buyers  
•       •       •

801 clicks; posted to Business » on 07 Jul 2020 at 8:35 AM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



32 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-07-07 9:05:18 AM  
Of course not.  They're the brain child of business majors who think their entire office is a constantly morphing team of hyper-production that has to be together at all times.  And that might actually work for some people/jobs.  But I see that *way* too much in the IT world in places where it is a serious detriment to production.
 
2020-07-07 9:19:37 AM  
My wife and I constantly watch HGTV for the various shows on there. Whenever we see someone biatching about "but it's not open concept" we start getting heated at the people on TV. You need a delineation between your kitchen and your living room. It needs to feel like a room. No, you're house is not going to be party central 24/7, so stop acting like "we like to entertain" is a valid excuse for that kind of design.
 
2020-07-07 9:29:35 AM  

jayphat: My wife and I constantly watch HGTV for the various shows on there. Whenever we see someone biatching about "but it's not open concept" we start getting heated at the people on TV. You need a delineation between your kitchen and your living room. It needs to feel like a room. No, you're house is not going to be party central 24/7, so stop acting like "we like to entertain" is a valid excuse for that kind of design.


If there is no delineation between the living room and the kitchen then you have to keep the kitchen dang clean otherwise your neighbor will see the mess in the kitchen when she comes over to chat for 5 minutes.
 
2020-07-07 9:33:36 AM  
I will never buy a home without walls AND DOORS again. I can hear Doc McStuffins all day everywhere in my house.it's actually the only thing in the PRO column for sending the kid back to daycare.

A simple set of French doors would do wonders for the kid's play area, and the extra wall space would give us room to hang things.

/Next house: Split level or finished basement!
 
2020-07-07 9:38:51 AM  

UberDave: Of course not.  They're the brain child of business majors who think their entire office is a constantly morphing team of hyper-production that has to be together at all times.  And that might actually work for some people/jobs.  But I see that *way* too much in the IT world in places where it is a serious detriment to production.


There are only two reasons for open floor plan offices: cost, and control ("I can see everyone working!").  Any other reason is just a sad attempt to pretend otherwise.

jayphat: My wife and I constantly watch HGTV for the various shows on there. Whenever we see someone biatching about "but it's not open concept" we start getting heated at the people on TV. You need a delineation between your kitchen and your living room. It needs to feel like a room. No, you're house is not going to be party central 24/7, so stop acting like "we like to entertain" is a valid excuse for that kind of design.


People who want open concept kitchens are insane. Unfortunately, they seem to be either numerous enough or loud enough to cause basically everything to be that way now. Either that, or they're cheaper to construct and thus everything is again just an attempt to pretend otherwise.
 
2020-07-07 9:40:03 AM  
White People Renovating Houses - South Park | Comedy Central UK
Youtube QgkhUT4yDx8
 
2020-07-07 9:40:04 AM  
The open-floor plan followed the rules of fashion - something trendy to make people spend money.  It was never practical.

And in hurricane country, it puts ones house at greater risk because there are no doors to break up the wind.
 
2020-07-07 9:43:59 AM  

Muta: jayphat: My wife and I constantly watch HGTV for the various shows on there. Whenever we see someone biatching about "but it's not open concept" we start getting heated at the people on TV. You need a delineation between your kitchen and your living room. It needs to feel like a room. No, you're house is not going to be party central 24/7, so stop acting like "we like to entertain" is a valid excuse for that kind of design.

If there is no delineation between the living room and the kitchen then you have to keep the kitchen dang clean otherwise your neighbor will see the mess in the kitchen when she comes over to chat for 5 minutes.


Bold of you to assume I'll talk to my neighbors, let alone let them inside my house.
 
2020-07-07 9:52:44 AM  
If your house is big enough there's enough space for privacy. For McMansions it's sort of the equivalent of a Victorian ballroom or music room.  There's still a den and office and man cave and teen hangout and a bathroom for every bedroom and a master retreat with sitting area etc.

If you're trying to act rich in a middle class house then you're farked.  Unless you live alone.
 
2020-07-07 9:56:55 AM  
Meh, trend chasing tends to be a bad idea in home design as it is in everything else.  That is what happened with the open floor plan and I doubt a knee-jerk reaction to it will bring an improvement.

Full disclosure, My house has an open floor plan where the Kitchen transitions directly into the Great Room (two story family room)  I do have an office that is separated by a hallway and door and that is where I have been working from for the past few months.  To me, its the best of both worlds.  I get the privacy I need in my office, and I never feel cramped or claustrophobic in the Kitchen/Great Room area, which is where I am spending 75% of my waking non-working hours these days.
 
2020-07-07 10:12:29 AM  

Psychohazard: The open-floor plan followed the rules of fashion - something trendy to make people spend money.  It was never practical.

And in hurricane country, it puts ones house at greater risk because there are no doors to break up the wind.


bro, in hurricane country, it does not matter how many doors and walls you have inside the home. If the wind and rain have entered the home, you are farked. You shouldn't have too terribly many load-baring walls in the interior of your home.

Double and even tripply so in tornado country.

Know what makes much more of a difference in those regions? Damn good storm windows, proper storm shutters and roof anchors, in conjunction with proper truss cleating.
 
2020-07-07 10:32:28 AM  
GOOD.
Can we also finally get rid of THIS nonsense now as well?
Don't get me wrong - I just love listening to Pete's discussion with his wife about what movie to watch later, or Sally's Female Issues and corresponding appointment with her gyno. But not when I'm trying to code.

acuity.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-07 10:34:19 AM  
Remember to drink your Ovaltine.
 
2020-07-07 10:45:39 AM  
So put up a wall and when you hate where it is knock it down without worrying that it is load bearing. Open floor plans are still superior.
 
2020-07-07 10:48:58 AM  
The LAST thing I'd want to have in my house is an office.
 
2020-07-07 10:56:55 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-07 11:06:44 AM  

MelGoesOnTour: The LAST thing I'd want to have in my house is an office.


Funny enough, we've been discussing getting a larger apartment just to convert one of the bedrooms into a dedicated office.

/even pre-Covid we both worked from home a lot.
 
2020-07-07 11:08:40 AM  

trialpha: UberDave: Of course not.  They're the brain child of business majors who think their entire office is a constantly morphing team of hyper-production that has to be together at all times.  And that might actually work for some people/jobs.  But I see that *way* too much in the IT world in places where it is a serious detriment to production.

There are only two reasons for open floor plan offices: cost, and control ("I can see everyone working!").  Any other reason is just a sad attempt to pretend otherwise.

jayphat: My wife and I constantly watch HGTV for the various shows on there. Whenever we see someone biatching about "but it's not open concept" we start getting heated at the people on TV. You need a delineation between your kitchen and your living room. It needs to feel like a room. No, you're house is not going to be party central 24/7, so stop acting like "we like to entertain" is a valid excuse for that kind of design.

People who want open concept kitchens are insane. Unfortunately, they seem to be either numerous enough or loud enough to cause basically everything to be that way now. Either that, or they're cheaper to construct and thus everything is again just an attempt to pretend otherwise.


You hit the nail on the head. Leaving out walls means they save on construction, but charge you more for the house because it's a fashionable design.
 
2020-07-07 11:31:20 AM  

standardeviation: I will never buy a home without walls AND DOORS again. I can hear Doc McStuffins all day everywhere in my house.it's actually the only thing in the PRO column for sending the kid back to daycare.

A simple set of French doors would do wonders for the kid's play area, and the extra wall space would give us room to hang things.

/Next house: Split level or finished basement!


Open concept is in and it'll pick you up.
If you're a parent, you're in luck.
It's ok...don't be afraid.
The architect really knows her stuff!

Do do do, you know its good for you,
Open concept will make you feel better!
Oh oh oh its the place to go,
When your kids have you under the weather.

Let open concept do its thing
To get you right back in the swing.
Open concept, open concept,
Come let the annoyance begin.

Open concept is in!
 
2020-07-07 12:00:22 PM  
It's a good thing there are houses and apartments built before all that.
 
2020-07-07 12:08:47 PM  

Autoerotic Defenestration: [Fark user image image 500x753]


I would also like to see a 48 special following a couple after one of them catches a stomach bug.
 
2020-07-07 12:34:00 PM  

jayphat: My wife and I constantly watch HGTV for the various shows on there. Whenever we see someone biatching about "but it's not open concept" we start getting heated at the people on TV. You need a delineation between your kitchen and your living room. It needs to feel like a room. No, you're house is not going to be party central 24/7, so stop acting like "we like to entertain" is a valid excuse for that kind of design.


I want to see somebody apply the "Pop Up Video" concept to House Hunters. Every time the couple says something, I want to see it fact checked or other snarky stuff pop up. "Oh, we like to entertain" gets a word bubble with "They've had exactly six people over to their house. Ever." They "don't like popcorn ceilings?" Turns out "They don't even know what a popcorn ceiling is and are just repeating what they think they should."

I can, however, understand that some openness between the kitchen, dining area, and great room is nice. It lets people preparing meals or cleaning up be part of whatever is going on in the living area. But you'll still want some separate rooms elsewhere- like a home office in the basement or something. I would love to open our kitchen up- it's too small and cur off from the rest of the house. But we'd end up dropping probably $75K to make that happen and we might not like the result. It's really one of the few things we actively don't like about our house.
 
2020-07-07 1:04:57 PM  
We have an open kitchen/living room design, which we appreciate.  It has it's benefits.  Growing up we had a large family, and the kitchen was where most everyone hung out and socialized.  Having the open floor area meant it never felt crowded, and you could still prep dinner while hanging out with the family.  That being said, it absolutely wouldn't work if we didn't also have a few other rooms we can escape to and close the door.

Open floor plans let families be together, but doors save marriages.
 
2020-07-07 1:20:20 PM  
I have a galley kitchen and I'd kill for anything else. I actually have friends and family so it's always been a headache. Even with only the wife and I it's crowded. FFS you can't even get by when the fridge or oven doors are open.
 
2020-07-07 1:40:48 PM  
Open plan houses do make sense-you can cook and watch the kids (or party guests, if you insist) at the same time.

If you are working from home and have small children, you still need to watch them pretty much constantly to make sure they are still breathing and stuff.  Of course, this isn't practical in the least, so you really shouldn't do it, but...

Now, if your kids are a bit older, then should be able to fend for themselves at least a bit, so a home office makes sense.  But a lot of houses that are big enough to really have an "open floor plan" also have an office (or  a spare bedroom, same basic thing).
 
2020-07-07 4:02:25 PM  

jayphat: My wife and I constantly watch HGTV for the various shows on there. Whenever we see someone biatching about "but it's not open concept" we start getting heated at the people on TV. You need a delineation between your kitchen and your living room. It needs to feel like a room. No, you're house is not going to be party central 24/7, so stop acting like "we like to entertain" is a valid excuse for that kind of design.


I have a tri-level where the basement is the primary location for hanging out (all the games are down there, the biggest tv, it's cooler in the summer and it's a bigger room than the family room next to the kitchen on the main level) .

I need a kitchen remodel on the main floor and everyone tells me how great removing the dividing wall (still half open anyway) would be. I don't have string opinions either way.

You say I need a divider there. Why do I need it? What do I need it for?

My real estate agent says open would be better for resale. Open wouldn't bother me in the slightest. According to a remodeler I spoke to it wouldn't be a huge cost difference.
 
2020-07-07 7:09:14 PM  
My wife and I don't have kids (thank FSM!) but we have had a friend living with us since December. None of us have worked since at least March 20th.

Our friend's stay was only supposed to be until March or April during which time he would write, do research, and look for teaching positions (he has a Ph.D. in History). Well, our county shut down on March 18th, colleges & universities around the country imposed hiring freezes, and, thus, our friend is still here.

We don't have an "open concept floor plan" (DRINK!), per se, but the living room and dining room are open to one another and one can see from that area to the kitchen and vice versa through two doorways. However, the house itself is 2BD/2BA and only 994 sq. ft. (excluding our enclosed patio) so there are very few areas any of us can have privacy. Our friend has the spare bedroom which, before he moved in, was my combined office and music room. It used to be my palace of solitude, but seeing as how our bedroom doesn't have a desk and the enclosed patio 1) is completely exposed on almost all sides; 2) is not insulated (so it's hotter than balls on hot days and colder than a witch's tit on cold days); and 3) doubles as the laundry room, it's hardly a trade-off I'm pleased to make (though I've made it work as best I can).

Still, with our current setup, we are all pretty sick of one another at this point. I'm fairly introverted; don't like crowds; loud noises or needless conversation; and need my own space to think, meditate, recharge, and be alone with my thoughts. My wife is extremely extroverted and thrives when there's structure and routine so this SIP and layoff has hit her pretty hard. She has a serious case of cabin fever and spends most of her days playing games on her iPad or mindlessly tending the garden.

Our friend is quite another story altogether. He's very much a creature of habit: he gets up pretty much the same time every day, doesn't vary his grocery shopping list or meals by much, and his conversations lately have generally revolved around one of only 3 or 4 topics. He's been constantly listening to podcasts which are usually on the topic of politics and/or the virus. We happen to be mostly on the same page on both topics but, damn dude...I don't need to be constantly reminded that we're all going to hell in a handbasket and I can already smell smoke.

Plus, he's not the most graceful guy. He walks heavy and is what I call a hoverer. And while I appreciate that he wants to clean and put dishes away, he always seems to pick a time when I'm trying to concentrate and then proceeds to make a lot of noise while doing so.

He also has rarely left the house through all of this, though over the past month or so, he has started going out a couple times a week to go hiking or take a drive to the coast. Those have been welcome respites, but they always seem too brief.

Fortunately, about 6 weeks ago, he remotely interviewed for, and was offered, three different community college jobs; one in Colorado, one in Texas, and one in Louisiana. He chose the one in Colorado and will be hitting the road later this week.

With him leaving, I will be getting my office/music room back, so I actually might be able to be somewhat productive with my writing, playing, and studying for my property management license. After he moved in, I set up an office in our enclosed patio, but as I explained above, it's not the best place for long-term storage of musical gear, nor is it exactly conducive to a quiet, meditative place where I can actually accomplish stuff.

He and I have been friends for nearly 30 years. He was a groomsman at both of my weddings and was the co-officiant at my first wife's memorial service. We will continue to be friends until we both move on to the next plane of existence. However, I'm not necessarily broken up over him finally leaving. And, honestly, I think he's as sick of us as we are of him at this point.

I honestly don't know how you people with kids or roommates do it without feeling homicidal every damn day. Once our friend moves out, it's highly unlikely I'll be open to offering our place to anyone for more than a few days. It just causes too much stress and anxiety for me these days.
 
2020-07-07 7:30:45 PM  
Why the hate on kitchens combined with living space? I like to know where my family is - both our new house and last house we basically live in the kitchen/living room area as a family of five. That being said, I am lucky we have a ton of other spaces for privacy (one of those McMansions without the stupidity in design) but ironically the only time we adults go to those spaces are after the kids go to bed.
 
2020-07-07 7:37:04 PM  

americanflannel: Why the hate on kitchens combined with living space? I like to know where my family is - both our new house and last house we basically live in the kitchen/living room area as a family of five. That being said, I am lucky we have a ton of other spaces for privacy (one of those McMansions without the stupidity in design) but ironically the only time we adults go to those spaces are after the kids go to bed.


Yes,I'd like to see those who hate open space like that explain to me why.

I'm not calling them out, I want advice before I pull the trigger on this renovation. In my situation it isn't like anyone in the family room has actual privacy from the kitchen either.
 
2020-07-08 1:10:47 AM  

misterblint: My wife and I don't have kids (thank FSM!) but we have had a friend living with us since December. None of us have worked since at least March 20th.

Our friend's stay was only supposed to be until March or
April....


I'm bummed that you'll die alone. I guess everybody does.

We've spent our lives raising 5 incredible kids, 1 granddaughter and a grandson on the way. Hopefully more to come.

My wife and I came from severely farked up families and somehow managed to get our Brady bunch to thrive and exceed our own accomplisments.

That's the American dream.
 
2020-07-08 10:56:08 AM  

SafetyThird: misterblint: My wife and I don't have kids (thank FSM!) but we have had a friend living with us since December. None of us have worked since at least March 20th.

Our friend's stay was only supposed to be until March or
April....

I'm bummed that you'll die alone. I guess everybody does.

We've spent our lives raising 5 incredible kids, 1 granddaughter and a grandson on the way. Hopefully more to come.

My wife and I came from severely farked up families and somehow managed to get our Brady bunch to thrive and exceed our own accomplisments.

That's the American dream.


That's certainly some people's idea of the American Dream - just not ours. I've known since my teens that I didn't want children. Not once have I feel the need to be a parent nor did I feel it necessary to create more humans when there are plenty of them around already.

That said, I'm happy you are happy and fulfilled.
 
2020-07-08 4:23:28 PM  
My place's floor plan is perfect:

Fark user imageView Full Size


Fark user imageView Full Size



The door you can see in the living room goes to the garage. The rest of the rooms are all off an L shaped hallway. So nice wide open living space with private bedrooms and bathrooms.

Pardon my chicken wraps remains. I'm farking while letting the chow settle.
 
Displayed 32 of 32 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.