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(Politico)   No one knows how the hell to safely reopen schools   (politico.com) divider line
    More: Murica, High school, Education, School, Teacher, Fairfax County's teachers unions, school districts, new school year, public spaces  
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3959 clicks; posted to Main » and Politics » on 04 Jul 2020 at 6:46 PM (1 year ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-05 9:02:15 AM  

Do you know the way to Mordor: Nobody knows how to reopen schools safely? Rubbish.

Some countries are doing better at this than others, and everyone needs to learn from the countries that have been doing it without increasing Covid-19 cases significantly.

The problem is that for some time, many American authorities have been refusing to listen to anyone advising on the best way to do anything.

Here are some examples of world's best practice on this issue:

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-hea​lth-coronavirus-schools/lessons-from-a​round-the-world-how-schools-are-openin​g-up-after-covid-19-lockdowns-idUSKBN2​2P2KC

https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/202​0/06/11/how-schools-in-other-countries​-have-reopened.html

https://abcnews.go.com/International/s​chools-world-reopening-coronavirus-pan​demic/story?id=70641371


But this is the USA.
 
2020-07-05 11:30:21 AM  
We have hired a tutor for our 7 year old.  Luckily my son is only 3, so maybe he skips all of this.

My 7 year old had 1 class a week on google.  Half the class showed up.  My wife is a stay at home mom and former banker. So we do our best but we know so many people with kids being left behind.

My younger cousin in Arkansas leaves her 8 year old and 4 year old home alone everyday.  Her father/my uncle was murdered and her mother just died of breast cancer.

We have no grandparent or anyone else alive to help us, unless in my case we can afford it.

My poor cousin is a delivery driver and probably makes $15k a year.

None of this will end well unless we get some leadership so it's not just people like me who can afford to have our children actually learn something during this crazy time.

My cousin swinging by the school and picking up a couple of worksheets isn't going to do much for her kids.

I'm already planning on being the one who pays for them to go to community college.  And I've already payed for another cousin to go to Haskell Indian College.

Yes, I'm an only child taught empathy and sympathy.

We do exist.
 
2020-07-05 12:01:30 PM  

Mikey1969: Snapper Carr: Easy answer:

Don't.

You think adults are bad at infection control discipline?

We are but kids are much much worse.

We're doing the home school thing this year, but I'm sure as shiat keeping that short lived. Hopefully a year is all we need. I don't care what the home school cheerleaders say, kids need social interaction as part of growing up.


They also need a maths education that doesn't start with "pi=3" and a science education that doesn't start with "Eve was created from Adam's rib".

People who champion home schooling are weird, even if, ironically, it's the single best option right now because of the pandemic.
 
2020-07-05 12:13:52 PM  
Disease transmission is the ultimate wild car in all of this. As a teacher of thirty-three years at all three levels, here are my takes on this topic.  1. The exposure/transmission vectors are and will be impossible to control. One single student, teacher or any other school employee can be a "typhoid Mary". Because Covid has both asymptomatic and symptomatic carriers, how do you screen everyone????
 
2020-07-05 12:21:16 PM  

Gyrfalcon: namegoeshere: This is one where there is no good answer.

Yeah, there is: Wait till there's a vaccine. Period. Or, accept that 80% of kids will contract the virus, and 4% will die, just like it was back in the bad old days of smallpox, measles, typhoid, and diphtheria, before vaccines were ever invented.


Where are you getting 4%?
 
2020-07-05 12:41:38 PM  

gregscott: gregscott: Home Schools don't have a significant problem with this.

They also don't have anything resembling a legitimate curriculum.

--------------------

Well, I was certified to teach math and physics, and my wife was certified to teach language arts, history and special education. We designed an eclectic curriculum well suited to the needs of our autistic son and our neurotypical son. They scored extremely well on standardized tests. And we knew many parents without education credentials who home schooled their children with great success, almost all of the students them at well above grade level. When public schools have a better record than home schools, then maybe you will have a point. 25 years ago, when we did it, it was far better. We led a couple of home school support groups over the years. Perhaps if you were familiar with more home schools, you would recognize their potential for success. Perhaps that norm has deteriorated over the years, but that would depend on the parents, wouldn't it? As with anything, if you don't put in the work, you won't get the results.

Perhaps you should examine your prejudices. We've know home school teachers from very conservative to very liberal, with advanced educations to high school diplomas. All but one family raised autodidacts who loved education, and exceeded norms. Some of these schools had formal standardized curriculua, and others had varying degrees of John Holt's "unschooling" elements.


I see both sides of this issue. You and your wife are the ideal. However, many states do not even require a parent to have a  high school diploma, much less a college degree, to home school. Like you, I have witnessed fantastic successes with home schooling such as kids testing two grades ahead in some subject areas while also learning violin, ballet, and martial arts and flourishing along with their friends made in their activities chosen to match their interests.

Like GregScott, I have watched a high school drop out in my own family home school two children with the result that one child, who tested as gifted as child, was subsequently unable to get into any college. Thankfully, after some rocky years he found a path to a medical related vocation. He put himself through school and earned all high "A's." His accomplishment is despite his parents' not because of them. The same parents have been home schooling their daughter. She is several grades behind. She's soon going to be a teenager. Having a conversation with her is like having a conversation with a very tall 4 or 5 year old. What's being done to her is a tragedy and there isn't a thing in the world anyone can do about it because they are within the law and within their rights as parents.

I think we should gradually phase in a requirement that home school parents have an undergrad degree. I would make certain age exemptions and walk it in slowly so as not to eliminate any very bright grandmothers from serving as temporary Covid-19 instructors; grandmothers who lack a college degree only because absolutely everyone didn't go to college when they were young and finishing high school was actually an accomplishment then. Of course, there still would be no way to practically sort out the person who is an avid reader, with a keen interest in science and the world from the person who thinks watching Wheel of Fortune is enriching and educational. But surely it would help at least a little.
 
2020-07-05 12:50:37 PM  

Murkanen: They also need a maths education that doesn't start with "pi=3"


Well, you have to round it off someplace...
 
2020-07-05 1:00:20 PM  

Surrender your boo-tah: Gyrfalcon: namegoeshere: This is one where there is no good answer.

Yeah, there is: Wait till there's a vaccine. Period. Or, accept that 80% of kids will contract the virus, and 4% will die, just like it was back in the bad old days of smallpox, measles, typhoid, and diphtheria, before vaccines were ever invented.

Where are you getting 4%?


Highest accepted death rate for COVID.
 
2020-07-05 1:17:13 PM  
Send all the kids who are aching to go back to school back to school with social distancing and face masks and lots of soap and hand sanitzer.

Send the rest of them to the labor concentration camps run by Trumpers.

Didn't you ever read Animal Farm? It's the Republican Pig Meister Handbook.
 
2020-07-05 1:18:39 PM  

Gyrfalcon: Surrender your boo-tah: Gyrfalcon: namegoeshere: This is one where there is no good answer.

Yeah, there is: Wait till there's a vaccine. Period. Or, accept that 80% of kids will contract the virus, and 4% will die, just like it was back in the bad old days of smallpox, measles, typhoid, and diphtheria, before vaccines were ever invented.

Where are you getting 4%?

Highest accepted death rate for COVID.


By pure coincidence, 4% of Americans are mass affluent and make donations to political parties, churches and their old alma maters.

Think it out.
 
2020-07-05 1:23:52 PM  

outtatowner: WyDave: [Fark user image image 425x294]Our Republican State Superintendent just benched herself for two weeks because she attended an event with Kim Guilfoyle. It'd be nice if our leaders had the sense god gave geese

[Fark user image 425x318]


A souped up version of my "If I can hit you with my hockey stick, you are too close" joke. Works well for me.
 
2020-07-05 2:30:25 PM  

JolobinSmokin: We have hired a tutor for our 7 year old.  Luckily my son is only 3, so maybe he skips all of this.

My 7 year old had 1 class a week on google.  Half the class showed up.  My wife is a stay at home mom and former banker. So we do our best but we know so many people with kids being left behind.

My younger cousin in Arkansas leaves her 8 year old and 4 year old home alone everyday.  Her father/my uncle was murdered and her mother just died of breast cancer.

We have no grandparent or anyone else alive to help us, unless in my case we can afford it.

My poor cousin is a delivery driver and probably makes $15k a year.

None of this will end well unless we get some leadership so it's not just people like me who can afford to have our children actually learn something during this crazy time.

My cousin swinging by the school and picking up a couple of worksheets isn't going to do much for her kids.

I'm already planning on being the one who pays for them to go to community college.  And I've already payed for another cousin to go to Haskell Indian College.

Yes, I'm an only child taught empathy and sympathy.

We do exist.


Your story breaks my heart. In my life before children, who are now grown, I taught niche school mathematics. I live in the great white north, but have been wondering what I can do to help in situations like this in my community, or online. Does anyone have any ideas?
 
2020-07-05 5:56:05 PM  
Maybe they can do a hybrid online / in-person system. Like one cohort goes in Monday and Wednesday; the second cohort goes in Tuesday and Thursday; and Friday is all online always.

That can help social distancing. Also be draconian in enforcement of mask wearing. And if anyone shows up to class sick, they are penalized.
 
2020-07-05 8:42:03 PM  
I feel for both you parents, and educators.

As neither of each, I can't directly relate, but I wish you the best of luck through this bullshiat.
 
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