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(Yahoo)   So no one really falls for the Nigerian email scam, right? Right?   (news.yahoo.com) divider line
    More: Facepalm, Bank, E-mail, Federal Bureau of Investigation, Cheque, Wire transfer, Banking, Ramon Olorunwa Abbas, Money  
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4768 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Jul 2020 at 12:31 PM (4 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-04 8:40:45 AM  
You wouldn't keep getting the emails if the scam wasnt working somewhere.

Granted, this was a little more sophisticated than the usual "Hello, I am Prince Namabooty. You have a rich relative that has passed away and we need your bank information to transfer you your millions."
 
2020-07-04 9:50:08 AM  
Even Nixon's Head fell for the Scammers.

And Trump is no Nixon, so I will assume that he just conveyed America to Nigeria or somewhere Shiathole, without reading the thread or the article to spoil my post-Truth immaculate conception.
 
2020-07-04 10:43:07 AM  
There are days where I wish I had more time. As it is, I get very few of those, and very few spam calls. I get the occasional call or voice mail that the IRS is after me and the sheriff will have warrants for my arrest, or the current credit card robo call. 

More adventures in replying to spam | James Veitch
Youtube C4Uc-cztsJo
 
2020-07-04 12:15:52 PM  

Officer Barrelroll: You wouldn't keep getting the emails if the scam wasnt working somewhere.

Granted, this was a little more sophisticated than the usual "Hello, I am Prince Namabooty. You have a rich relative that has passed away and we need your bank information to transfer you your millions."


They've found that the more sophisticated you make the scam, the worse you profit.  This particular bit of chicanery requires a particularly dumb farker to work.  So, making the premise particularly idiotic winnows the target pool down to just the ones it will work on.  Everyone else goes "This is some weak-ass dumb shiat.  Who would fall for it?" before deleting the email.  Which helps the scammers.  Anyone with doubts or reservations might pull out after the scammer has invested time and effort into the meat of the pantomime.  If you respond to them, you are self-selecting as worth their time and effort.

And the cute part is that if you fall for it once, and get burned, you are more likely to fall for it again, not less.  So, repeated email-blasts are still profitable.
 
2020-07-04 12:35:24 PM  

phalamir: Officer Barrelroll: You wouldn't keep getting the emails if the scam wasnt working somewhere.

Granted, this was a little more sophisticated than the usual "Hello, I am Prince Namabooty. You have a rich relative that has passed away and we need your bank information to transfer you your millions."

They've found that the more sophisticated you make the scam, the worse you profit.  This particular bit of chicanery requires a particularly dumb farker to work.  So, making the premise particularly idiotic winnows the target pool down to just the ones it will work on.  Everyone else goes "This is some weak-ass dumb shiat.  Who would fall for it?" before deleting the email.  Which helps the scammers.  Anyone with doubts or reservations might pull out after the scammer has invested time and effort into the meat of the pantomime.  If you respond to them, you are self-selecting as worth their time and effort.

And the cute part is that if you fall for it once, and get burned, you are more likely to fall for it again, not less.  So, repeated email-blasts are still profitable.


I worked in the financial fraud investigation field for years. I've seen a lot of different scams where people have lost money.  In a lot of instances it really came down to greed of the victim. 1000% return in six weeks with no risk? Sounds awesome, where should I send the money!! In almost all cases, the slightest bit of due diligence would have revealed it to be a complete fraud.

I saw someone lose seven figures because they were searching online for the highest rate CD they could find and wired money to one that was offering an impossibily high rate.

Another one was a person that fell victim to the Jamaican lottery scam. We asked if the person had ever been to Jamaica or bought a lottery ticket based in Jamaica. They said no. Ummm, so how exactly could you have won money in a lottery there?
 
2020-07-04 12:36:19 PM  

phalamir: Officer Barrelroll: You wouldn't keep getting the emails if the scam wasnt working somewhere.

Granted, this was a little more sophisticated than the usual "Hello, I am Prince Namabooty. You have a rich relative that has passed away and we need your bank information to transfer you your millions."

They've found that the more sophisticated you make the scam, the worse you profit.  This particular bit of chicanery requires a particularly dumb farker to work.  So, making the premise particularly idiotic winnows the target pool down to just the ones it will work on.  Everyone else goes "This is some weak-ass dumb shiat.  Who would fall for it?" before deleting the email.  Which helps the scammers.  Anyone with doubts or reservations might pull out after the scammer has invested time and effort into the meat of the pantomime.  If you respond to them, you are self-selecting as worth their time and effort.

And the cute part is that if you fall for it once, and get burned, you are more likely to fall for it again, not less.  So, repeated email-blasts are still profitable.


They'll actually include intentional misspellings and grammatical errors in these emails to make sure that the people who respond to them are really, really stupid.
 
2020-07-04 12:43:46 PM  
Oh god don't tell me that Trump...

>clicks link<

Premier league and biglaw? Thank the gods!

It's a pretty bad sign when I read a Fark headline like that and just assume it involves the President.
 
2020-07-04 12:47:21 PM  
Just had some people get scammed on craigslist showing up to my vacation rental wondering how to get it. I felt bad for them..but seriously...who books a rental , pay first, never get a phone number or meet the people on Craigslist????
One thing to note, it is a pain in the ass to get a fake post taken down on CL. fark those guys.
 
2020-07-04 12:49:00 PM  

jake_lex: They'll actually include intentional misspellings and grammatical errors in these emails to make sure that the people who respond to them are really, really stupid.


that sounds like some biz I should get into
 
2020-07-04 12:52:28 PM  

Officer Barrelroll: You wouldn't keep getting the emails if the scam wasnt working somewhere.

Granted, this was a little more sophisticated than the usual "Hello, I am Prince Namabooty. You have a rich relative that has passed away and we need your bank information to transfer you your millions."


Cool!
Here's my bank account number: 5369-467463-23288
 
2020-07-04 12:52:45 PM  
Knowing Americans, it works a WHOLE LOT.
 
2020-07-04 12:54:33 PM  

Kalyco Jack: Oh god don't tell me that Trump...

>clicks link<

Premier league and biglaw? Thank the gods!

It's a pretty bad sign when I read a Fark headline like that and just assume it involves the President.


Trump would probably give the the keys to the US Treasury main account.
 
2020-07-04 12:56:03 PM  
The problem with scams is that they do bulk contact. Just like the lottery you only need to win once. So unfortunately yes there are people who fall for it. You only need one victim. Or three.
 
2020-07-04 12:57:57 PM  
Saw it happen a few times when I worked at a place that had Western Union. One I was able to prevent, another lady sent and sent money and we kept asking her if she knew the people and was sure about it. Showed up one day saying we were right and she lost her money.
 
2020-07-04 1:00:19 PM  

Officer Barrelroll: You wouldn't keep getting the emails if the scam wasnt working somewhere.

Granted, this was a little more sophisticated than the usual "Hello, I am Prince Namabooty. You have a rich relative that has passed away and we need your bank information to transfer you your millions."


Yeah, this doesn't sound like that at all.
 
2020-07-04 1:00:36 PM  
FTA:
Ramon Olorunwa Abbas, who went by the name Ray Hushpuppi

Who names themselves after food? How bizzare.
 
2020-07-04 1:01:23 PM  

Kalyco Jack: Oh god don't tell me that Trump...

>clicks link<

Premier league and biglaw? Thank the gods!

It's a pretty bad sign when I read a Fark headline like that and just assume it involves the President.


If it was him I expected that he'd given away North Dakota to a scammer thinking that it was a down payment on Greenland.
 
2020-07-04 1:01:27 PM  
Every Trumper would fall for the scam.
 
2020-07-04 1:02:54 PM  
A few months ago I tried to sell some furniture on Craigslist. Evidently, the furniture section is a huge farking magnet for scammers.

Anyway, I was bored and played along with some of them for a while. Got to the point where one of them wanted to send me a cashiers check, so I gave him the name and address of one of Oregon's derpier state senators.

The scammer sent the (obviously fake) check, gave me a tracking number, and confirmed that it arrived. I promptly blocked his number and email.

I really hope Senator Brian Boquist tried to deposit that check.
 
2020-07-04 1:03:01 PM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-04 1:03:42 PM  

Officer Barrelroll: phalamir: Officer Barrelroll: You wouldn't keep getting the emails if the scam wasnt working somewhere.

Granted, this was a little more sophisticated than the usual "Hello, I am Prince Namabooty. You have a rich relative that has passed away and we need your bank information to transfer you your millions."

They've found that the more sophisticated you make the scam, the worse you profit.  This particular bit of chicanery requires a particularly dumb farker to work.  So, making the premise particularly idiotic winnows the target pool down to just the ones it will work on.  Everyone else goes "This is some weak-ass dumb shiat.  Who would fall for it?" before deleting the email.  Which helps the scammers.  Anyone with doubts or reservations might pull out after the scammer has invested time and effort into the meat of the pantomime.  If you respond to them, you are self-selecting as worth their time and effort.

And the cute part is that if you fall for it once, and get burned, you are more likely to fall for it again, not less.  So, repeated email-blasts are still profitable.

I worked in the financial fraud investigation field for years. I've seen a lot of different scams where people have lost money.  In a lot of instances it really came down to greed of the victim. 1000% return in six weeks with no risk? Sounds awesome, where should I send the money!! In almost all cases, the slightest bit of due diligence would have revealed it to be a complete fraud.

I saw someone lose seven figures because they were searching online for the highest rate CD they could find and wired money to one that was offering an impossibily high rate.

Another one was a person that fell victim to the Jamaican lottery scam. We asked if the person had ever been to Jamaica or bought a lottery ticket based in Jamaica. They said no. Ummm, so how exactly could you have won money in a lottery there?


My father worked for a bank for decades, mostly small local branches. Back in the eighties, a business customer showed him one of these actual letters and asked him if was a solid investment idea. My father's response was that if some minuscule chance the investment actually returned money, it was guaranteed to be from criminal sources, and if that didn't bother the customer then he should take his business elsewhere.
 
2020-07-04 1:05:53 PM  

Unobtanium: There are days where I wish I had more time. As it is, I get very few of those, and very few spam calls. I get the occasional call or voice mail that the IRS is after me and the sheriff will have warrants for my arrest, or the current credit card robo call. 

[YouTube video: More adventures in replying to spam | James Veitch]


Yeah I am on dialysis so I have nothing but time most days. When they call I string them along for as long as possible. Interestingly since I started this I have gotten fewer and fewer calls. Now I rarely get one.
 
2020-07-04 1:08:34 PM  

talkertopc: Officer Barrelroll: You wouldn't keep getting the emails if the scam wasnt working somewhere.

Granted, this was a little more sophisticated than the usual "Hello, I am Prince Namabooty. You have a rich relative that has passed away and we need your bank information to transfer you your millions."

Cool!
Here's my bank account number: 5369-467463-23288


Weird, fark must not have the filter in place for back account numbers the way it has filters to block socisl security numbers and passwords.

I'll test it by typing out my ss# and password to see if Fark blocks it.

SS:***-**-****
Fark password:*********
 
2020-07-04 1:09:18 PM  

Officer Barrelroll: talkertopc: Officer Barrelroll: You wouldn't keep getting the emails if the scam wasnt working somewhere.

Granted, this was a little more sophisticated than the usual "Hello, I am Prince Namabooty. You have a rich relative that has passed away and we need your bank information to transfer you your millions."

Cool!
Here's my bank account number: 5369-467463-23288

Weird, fark must not have the filter in place for back account numbers the way it has filters to block socisl security numbers and passwords.

I'll test it by typing out my ss# and password to see if Fark blocks it.

SS:***-**-****
Fark password:*********


Awesome!

Glad to know Fark still has protective filters in place.
 
2020-07-04 1:12:37 PM  
Why would this idiot fly to the U.S. knowing damn well he's probably a huge target?
 
2020-07-04 1:13:48 PM  
You just know it Norwich that got scammed. Those poor folks just can't catch a break.
 
2020-07-04 1:13:57 PM  
I worked on an email issue for a client back around 2007 or 2008 and noticed a very obvious discussion with a Nigerian scammer. I let him know it wasn't legit but the client got upset and called me jealous that they reached out to him instead of me to disperse the millions of dollars.  I even printed out a document with info and implored him to research further.

He came in to my store about 2 months later with a different computer issue and apologized for how he treated me and admitted he lost over 30 grand in multiple stages to multiple scammers before he gave up on ever seeing a dime.
 
2020-07-04 1:15:07 PM  
I'm torn by these scammers. Hats off to them for being able to make the money they do by preying on stupid people.

I also happen to think it's disgusting and sad that the people who are getting taken advantage of are usually people in bad situations who are desperate to get out of them.

If only there were some way to just target stupid rich people. Guess I'll have to run for Congress in Florida.
 
2020-07-04 1:21:43 PM  
Hell, the Cheney-Rumsfeld-Bush administration fell for a Nigerian Letter. Otherwise, why all the fuss and bother about "Yellow Cake Uranium".

On a more personal note; the last ex-Mrs Bluesnark has been receiving a fairly substantial alimony/maintenance/allowance since our divorce in '03. Unfortunately for her, dementia runs hard through her family. When it became apparent that she was no longer able to make sound decisions, a couple of the Bluesnarkettes moved to take over her business dealings and financial matters.

After Finding all her paperwork, Then organizing it; they went through it a line at a time. Out of 17 years of monthly payments, they could not account for most of it. One of the things they did find in her mail were large numbers of solicitations from J Olsteen's Mega scam.

So, it's not just them furriner's taking advantage of people.

If you have a relative or friend who starts behaving strangely about their money. Talk to them casually. You might save them in more than one way.
 
2020-07-04 1:26:26 PM  
It's not a scam

Nigel Saladu
Youtube sCG-5fluNPo
 
2020-07-04 1:28:12 PM  
I have a cousin who was getting ready to fall for a Russian natural gas scam.  He got pretty ridiculed by family and friends for even looking into it. My only question to my cousin was "These dudes are in Russia and there are over 300,000,000 in the US, why the hell did they did they pick you?"

He told me "They heard good things about me".
 
2020-07-04 1:28:56 PM  
The instant I have to do anything to get anything for free, I am not doing that, especially if it means sending money.
 
2020-07-04 1:40:56 PM  
I got an actual check in the mail once. Because I "won" some lottery I never entered. But government regulations said that I had to pay the taxes on it first. All I had to do was to send the tax payment to some place and they would release the hold on the check.


Sure Jan
Youtube UD1-oVJlU4M
 
2020-07-04 1:46:20 PM  

thefatbasturd: Unobtanium: There are days where I wish I had more time. As it is, I get very few of those, and very few spam calls. I get the occasional call or voice mail that the IRS is after me and the sheriff will have warrants for my arrest, or the current credit card robo call. 

[YouTube video: More adventures in replying to spam | James Veitch]

Yeah I am on dialysis so I have nothing but time most days. When they call I string them along for as long as possible. Interestingly since I started this I have gotten fewer and fewer calls. Now I rarely get one.


I've only actually engaged two of them, because they started off a little different. I could still hear the (presumably) south Asian boiler room background noise, but what the heck. One was "the Federal Department of Grants" and they spoofed the 202 area code for DC. I strung him along until we argued about me giving him my bank routing info.

The other was the old "computer help desk, we have detected a computer virus," but he had some kind of different hook. Normally I just hung up on those guys, then alerted our IT guys that they were robodialing in our block of phone numbers. I strung one guy along long enough to get him to (I think) cuss me out and hang up when I asked him if the directions he was giving me made a difference on a Linux computer.
 
2020-07-04 1:53:17 PM  

Johnny the Tackling Alzheimers Patient: Officer Barrelroll: phalamir: Officer Barrelroll: You wouldn't keep getting the emails if the scam wasnt working somewhere.

Granted, this was a little more sophisticated than the usual "Hello, I am Prince Namabooty. You have a rich relative that has passed away and we need your bank information to transfer you your millions."

They've found that the more sophisticated you make the scam, the worse you profit.  This particular bit of chicanery requires a particularly dumb farker to work.  So, making the premise particularly idiotic winnows the target pool down to just the ones it will work on.  Everyone else goes "This is some weak-ass dumb shiat.  Who would fall for it?" before deleting the email.  Which helps the scammers.  Anyone with doubts or reservations might pull out after the scammer has invested time and effort into the meat of the pantomime.  If you respond to them, you are self-selecting as worth their time and effort.

And the cute part is that if you fall for it once, and get burned, you are more likely to fall for it again, not less.  So, repeated email-blasts are still profitable.

I worked in the financial fraud investigation field for years. I've seen a lot of different scams where people have lost money.  In a lot of instances it really came down to greed of the victim. 1000% return in six weeks with no risk? Sounds awesome, where should I send the money!! In almost all cases, the slightest bit of due diligence would have revealed it to be a complete fraud.

I saw someone lose seven figures because they were searching online for the highest rate CD they could find and wired money to one that was offering an impossibily high rate.

Another one was a person that fell victim to the Jamaican lottery scam. We asked if the person had ever been to Jamaica or bought a lottery ticket based in Jamaica. They said no. Ummm, so how exactly could you have won money in a lottery there?

My father worked for a bank for decades, mostly small local branches. Back in the eighties, a business customer showed him one of these actual letters and asked him if was a solid investment idea. My father's response was that if some minuscule chance the investment actually returned money, it was guaranteed to be from criminal sources, and if that didn't bother the customer then he should take his business elsewhere.


Back in 1990 on my first day as an in-house lawyer for a Fortune 50 company, a senior exec came to see me bearing a printout of a basic Nigerian scam email and asked me to review it. After 5 seconds I asked him if he realised it was a scam. He looked at me sheepishly, picked up the printout and left my office without saying a word.
 
2020-07-04 1:59:59 PM  
A friends mom fell for the check cashing scam.  Twice.

litespeed74: Just had some people get scammed on craigslist showing up to my vacation rental wondering how to get it. I felt bad for them..but seriously...who books a rental , pay first, never get a phone number or meet the people on Craigslist????
One thing to note, it is a pain in the ass to get a fake post taken down on CL. fark those guys.


Someone decided to fark with one of my neighbors recently.  Put a "free tools!" ad on Craigslist and gave his address.  I got some of the spillover from the ones who were dumb enough to fall for it AND were too stupid to go to the right address.  Or they figured if there weren't any free tools at the first house so they should check every house on the street.  I called the reeve's office and they sent out a deputy who called me to get more information just as yet another jackass was turning around in my yard.  I got to hear the guy get pulled over.  WHOOP-WHOOP!  "Stop!"  Heard the guy talk about a Craigslist ad and give my neighbor's address.  When I walked to the mailboxes to get my mail, there were two more vehicles trying to maneuver around each other to get out of the neighbor's driveway.  I talked to the neighbor (from a distance) and he said they'd been showing up all weekend.  One fool drove 4 hours.  During a pandemic.

I suspect it was perpetrated by the neighbor who lives across the street from him.  I'll call him Mr. Nutjob.  Mr. Nutjob thinks he owns a corner of the lot across the street.  But he doesn't own it because the property line runs down the middle of the street with a 22.5' offset from the center to each side making a 45' right of way thru the neighborhood.  The center of the road is the property line.  Mr. Nutjob also has a similar beef with his neighbor on the same side of the road.  I saw they had surveyors out there recently.  I feel fortunate that the weirdo who bought the lot across from me never built a house and eventually resold the property.
 
2020-07-04 2:06:21 PM  
fark scammers.  I vote we turn this guy over to the George Floyd cops for a round of questioning.
 
2020-07-04 2:11:49 PM  
Unobtanium: [redacted]... they spoofed the 202 area code for DC. I strung him along until we argued about me giving him my bank routing info.

And that's an issue. Why isn't the people in charge of caller ID not charged with aiding and abetting? They let these guys 'spoof' (actually commit fraud) theire numbers and names in these robocalls and it's our fault for monitoring the ID

/They still charge extra for the service, even tho they help bypass it.
// and then there's credit services that are now selling 'improved' ratings for a fee.
 
2020-07-04 2:19:14 PM  
I actually met someone who had sent more than a million dollars to the Nigerian scanners. He made some "Top 20" list put out by Great Britain's central bank or some such.

He was getting on in years, but had a distinguished career. His family finally put him in a home. Now deceased.

One of the later scams, his brother told me, was that the money was all ready, but $400 was needed for a special powder to clean it.
 
2020-07-04 2:40:52 PM  

Unobtanium: The other was the old "computer help desk, we have detected a computer virus," but he had some kind of different hook. Normally I just hung up on those guys, then alerted our IT guys that they were robodialing in our block of phone numbers. I strung one guy along long enough to get him to (I think) cuss me out and hang up when I asked him if the directions he was giving me made a difference on a Linux computer.


The ReplyAll episode where they engage a computer help desk scammer is epic:

Part 1 - they call back the scammers - https://gimletmedia.com/sh​ows/reply-al​l/6nh3wk/102-long-distance
Part 2 - they fly to India to talk to the scammers in person - https://gimletmedia.com/show​s/reply-al​l/76h5gl/103-long-distance-part-ii
 
2020-07-04 2:45:18 PM  

Doctoral Candidate Zaius: I'm torn by these scammers. Hats off to them for being able to make the money they do by preying on stupid people.

I also happen to think it's disgusting and sad that the people who are getting taken advantage of are usually people in bad situations who are desperate to get out of them.


A lot of them aren't really stupid, they're just old and their minds are starting to go, and they don't understand technology. And even when you explain it to them and/or how to prevent it, they often accept what you're saying and then just keep doing what they're doing because it's difficult to accept that they've become so feeble-minded that they can't tell when an obvious scam is staring them in the face.
 
2020-07-04 2:47:06 PM  
at least with stuff like Zelle or Paypal, I send a dollar first to make sure that people got it.  And I usually have them text me rather than email.

for other transfers, my bank has made recipients of transfers verify a small transfer as well.  Was trying to send money to my mom once before the zelle days (and she is a ludite, so no paypal).  Bank sent her two deposits worth less than a dollar and she was supposed to report their amounts.  She never got around to do it (she had to go to the bank) so I ended up having to do something else.  I think I might have paypaled my sister and then my sister gave her the cash.

anyway, always a good idea to send a dollar first an then call up the recipient to verify.  This guy made his millions because people didn't do that.
 
2020-07-04 2:48:29 PM  

sambluesnark: Hell, the Cheney-Rumsfeld-Bush administration fell for a Nigerian Letter. Otherwise, why all the fuss and bother about "Yellow Cake Uranium".



And the 2016 Clinton campaign fell for a scam that is covered in Phishing 101.

Dumbassery knows no political boundaries.
 
2020-07-04 3:03:29 PM  
It always amazes me that old white guys, who have spent their whole lives talking about how black people are untrustworthy, hating on Africa, and believing that the entire continent of Africa is just a bunch of half naked people with spears living in tents, how those people, are always the first to fall for Nigerian Prince scams.  It's amazing how many stereotypes and racist beliefs a moron can shed when he thinks he is going to strike it rich.
 
2020-07-04 3:05:07 PM  

thefatbasturd: Unobtanium: There are days where I wish I had more time. As it is, I get very few of those, and very few spam calls. I get the occasional call or voice mail that the IRS is after me and the sheriff will have warrants for my arrest, or the current credit card robo call. 

[YouTube video: More adventures in replying to spam | James Veitch]

Yeah I am on dialysis so I have nothing but time most days. When they call I string them along for as long as possible. Interestingly since I started this I have gotten fewer and fewer calls. Now I rarely get one.


Yeah fark that. The "I am calling from Microsoft" scams has completely dried up for me.

The second last one actually yelled "fark you for wasting my time!". Well, duh, sorry.


Last one just hung up, when I sounded, I guess, too concerned, about the problems with my PC.

Sigh.
 
2020-07-04 3:25:15 PM  

Officer Barrelroll: Officer Barrelroll: talkertopc: Officer Barrelroll: You wouldn't keep getting the emails if the scam wasnt working somewhere.

Granted, this was a little more sophisticated than the usual "Hello, I am Prince Namabooty. You have a rich relative that has passed away and we need your bank information to transfer you your millions."

Cool!
Here's my bank account number: 5369-467463-23288

Weird, fark must not have the filter in place for back account numbers the way it has filters to block socisl security numbers and passwords.

I'll test it by typing out my ss# and password to see if Fark blocks it.

SS:***-**-****
Fark password:*********

Awesome!

Glad to know Fark still has protective filters in place.


are you sure?  I can see your numbers plain as day.  try again.
 
2020-07-04 3:36:04 PM  
I just can't imagine suddenly having all that sweet, sweet crime cash he found himself rich with and spending it on three of those hideous personalized robes he got.
 
2020-07-04 3:59:35 PM  

DevilGirlFromMars: I just can't imagine suddenly having all that sweet, sweet crime cash he found himself rich with and spending it on three of those hideous personalized robes he got.


it a proof of how rich he is.  only a guy with that much money to burn would spend a large amount on ugly things.  He probably has nicer stuff that's not featured because normal people who have to be smart with money would also buy it.
 
2020-07-04 4:08:39 PM  
I have an elderly aunt that we have all disowned because she got absolutely nasty and aggressive when we tried to protect her from a Nigerian scamming her. He had her believing he was a retired white man in Nigeria who was in love with her and wanted to come marry her. She gave him gift cards, credit card numbers, bank account numbers, and sent him gifts. When her own kids tried to show her it was a scam, she threw shade at them for "trying to stop her from being happy" and moved to my side of the country. When we noticed her pattern of spending, her sneaking around to hide her conversations with this guy (or guys, for all we know), and saw that she was losing all her money which she NEEDED to be able to afford the assisted living she required, we stepped in to freeze her bank account and take away her online access. She raised a fuss, called us every name in the book, spread lies about us, openly declared she hated us, and would NOT accept that the photo of the guy she was supposedly going to marry when he got to America was that of a long-dead guy (we did the research and found whose identity the scammer was faking).

Total denial. Every negative comment, emotion, and action was directed at anyone trying to help her instead of at the scammer, who she believed entirely.

For all I know now, she's in a ditch somewhere. Don't care. She was rotten all her life, and when people tried to save her from herself she got even worse. Some people are too dumb and too stubborn to waste your energy on.
 
2020-07-04 4:16:37 PM  

Ketchuponsteak: thefatbasturd: Unobtanium: There are days where I wish I had more time. As it is, I get very few of those, and very few spam calls. I get the occasional call or voice mail that the IRS is after me and the sheriff will have warrants for my arrest, or the current credit card robo call. 

[YouTube video: More adventures in replying to spam | James Veitch]

Yeah I am on dialysis so I have nothing but time most days. When they call I string them along for as long as possible. Interestingly since I started this I have gotten fewer and fewer calls. Now I rarely get one.

Yeah fark that. The "I am calling from Microsoft" scams has completely dried up for me.

The second last one actually yelled "fark you for wasting my time!". Well, duh, sorry.


Last one just hung up, when I sounded, I guess, too concerned, about the problems with my PC.

Sigh.


Best for me was one time whennit didn't work the asshole tried a new tack and claimed he was with "The Illuminati". And then was stupid enough to spend more time trying to tell me who they were and what that meant for me.
 
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