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(Medium)   One for the Grammar Nazis - the most mispronounced word in the world   (humanparts.medium.com) divider line
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4154 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Jul 2020 at 12:30 AM (5 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



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2020-07-03 8:27:15 PM  
Sorry for the butthurt ma'mm. But your opinions are just that and should stay out of the media.

Been to Japan and it is pronounced both ways by the Japanese. Been to Hawaii and it is pronounced both ways by the Hawaiians.
 
2020-07-03 8:36:26 PM  
Univocal
 
2020-07-03 8:36:43 PM  
Route
 
2020-07-03 8:37:30 PM  
dissect (hint, it's not like bisect, or di-sect its dis-sect).
 
2020-07-03 8:40:19 PM  
It takes a special kind of douche to assume that someone is pronouncing their own name wrong.
 
2020-07-03 8:44:26 PM  
Here's a grammar question that stumped me the other day. Is it "an FAQ" or "a FAQ"? I have heard FAQ pronounced "fack" and "eff-aye-queue."

I ended up saying "a frequently asked questions section," so I was good. I'm just wondering what would have been correct if I used the abbreviation.
 
2020-07-03 8:44:59 PM  
How To Pronounce February
Youtube skUfQYr47QQ
 
2020-07-03 8:53:59 PM  
Is it "OFF-in"? Or OFF-tin?
 
2020-07-03 8:57:46 PM  
'ANTIFA'
 
2020-07-03 9:00:26 PM  
Aluminum.
 
2020-07-03 9:01:55 PM  
Dude should go to Versailles, Kentucky, insist on pronouncing it the French way, and watch the residents snicker at him.
 
2020-07-03 9:02:46 PM  

AngryTeacher: Here's a grammar question that stumped me the other day. Is it "an FAQ" or "a FAQ"? I have heard FAQ pronounced "fack" and "eff-aye-queue."

I ended up saying "a frequently asked questions section," so I was good. I'm just wondering what would have been correct if I used the abbreviation.


It's pronounced like "fap" with an "ack" on the end.

/always glad to help
 
2020-07-03 9:05:44 PM  
Next up, .gif versus .jiff
 
2020-07-03 9:05:50 PM  
What does grammar have to do with pronunciation?

You want pedantry? Take that!
 
2020-07-03 9:07:23 PM  
fark you, it's pronounced "wooter."
 
2020-07-03 9:27:11 PM  
Okey dokey, Carrie okie.
 
2020-07-03 9:28:51 PM  

wet drum sandwich: Dude should go to Versailles, Kentucky, insist on pronouncing it the French way, and watch the residents snicker at him.


Like Verdi, California near Reno, NV.
 
2020-07-03 9:30:54 PM  
One that kills me:

Clique.

It's not "click." It comes from French. "Cleek".

Had a teacher correct me in high school, and I've pronounced it properly ever since. "Click" hurts my ears when speaking of exclusive groups of people.
 
2020-07-03 9:33:51 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: One that kills me:

Clique.

It's not "click." It comes from French. "Cleek".

Had a teacher correct me in high school, and I've pronounced it properly ever since. "Click" hurts my ears when speaking of exclusive groups of people.


If almost no one pronounces it correctly and it bugs the shiat out of you, you're in a clique clique.
 
2020-07-03 9:35:53 PM  
If everyone is pronouncing a word a particular way, then it isn't a mispronunciation.
 
2020-07-03 9:40:20 PM  
The burden of superiority should be, for the well bred, born in silence.
But you're special.
Mommy told you,  and now you need to tell the world.
 
2020-07-03 9:53:23 PM  
Yet kowne quayi may svhee chown
 
2020-07-03 9:53:23 PM  
I'll take a chance at grammar Naziing the grammar Nazi.

More than once in the article, he uses the word "rhyme" when he should be using the word "pronounced":

Somewhere out there, no doubt walking around freely and without a clue of the grievous devastation inflicted on the rest of the world, is that first miscreant who looked at that word and decided it should somehow rhyme with "carry yokey." And then came the horror of horrors: that abominable mispronunciation spread 'round the world, catching on and setting in for the long haul.

No, someone decided it would be "pronounced" "carry yokey."  It would "rhyme" with "Mary Nokey."

Words that are spelled different but pronounced the same are not rhyming words. They are homophones. Their, there, and they're don't rhyme, the are homophones. "Carry yokey" and the supposedly mispronounced "karaoke" would be homophones, not rhymes, you worthless motherfarking grammar Nazi unfamiliar with homophones and person not quite sure what a rhyme is.
 
2020-07-03 10:02:51 PM  

naughtyrev: It takes a special kind of douche to assume that someone is pronouncing their own name wrong.


The bearer of the name absolutely has the final say. No argument.

But let's say you meet someone wearing a name tag that says "Hi! My name is Jacques."

And then let's say that you quite reasonably pronounce it the way all French speakers would: "Zhock." (That's an Americanization transliteration, but you get the point.)

Now say that Jacques rolls his eyes and says "No, DUMMY! It's pronounced "Jack-WEEZ."

Of course, you'd make a mental note that Jacques calls himself Jack-WEEZ. But you'll probably also make a mental note that Jacques has never met anyone who speaks French, and neither have his parents.

Jack-WEEZ is a mispronunciation of Jacques.
 
2020-07-03 11:18:05 PM  
Hawai'i, for example, is properly three syllables, not two, and that little apostrophe is a glottal stop


Even without the apostrophe and glottal stop it's still three syllables. I've never heard it said as two.

3 syllable - Ha why ee
2 syllable - Ha why

I really don't think I've heard somebody say it that second way without some sort of emphasis/inflection that made it the third syllable.

Like Ha whyee
 
2020-07-03 11:24:54 PM  

wet drum sandwich: Dude should go to Versailles, Kentucky, insist on pronouncing it the French way, and watch the residents snicker at him.


Same thing would happen in North Versailles, Pennsylvania (13 miles outside of Pittsburgh).
 
2020-07-03 11:26:33 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: One that kills me:

Clique.

It's not "click." It comes from French. "Cleek".

Had a teacher correct me in high school, and I've pronounced it properly ever since. "Click" hurts my ears when speaking of exclusive groups of people.


Huh, I didn't know that one, and have apparently never heard anyone say it correctly.
 
2020-07-03 11:28:49 PM  

AngryTeacher: Here's a grammar question that stumped me the other day. Is it "an FAQ" or "a FAQ"? I have heard FAQ pronounced "fack" and "eff-aye-queue."

I ended up saying "a frequently asked questions section," so I was good. I'm just wondering what would have been correct if I used the abbreviation.


FAQ is fine as either "fack" or "eff ay que".  In the former case, it'd be "a FAQ" and in the latter "an FAQ".
 
2020-07-03 11:29:47 PM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: One that kills me:

Clique.

It's not "click." It comes from French. "Cleek".

Had a teacher correct me in high school, and I've pronounced it properly ever since. "Click" hurts my ears when speaking of exclusive groups of people.


And were I to pronounce it in French, I'd use the French pronunciation.  Since I'm saying it in English, however....
 
2020-07-03 11:32:17 PM  

a particular individual: naughtyrev: It takes a special kind of douche to assume that someone is pronouncing their own name wrong.

The bearer of the name absolutely has the final say. No argument.

But let's say you meet someone wearing a name tag that says "Hi! My name is Jacques."

And then let's say that you quite reasonably pronounce it the way all French speakers would: "Zhock." (That's an Americanization transliteration, but you get the point.)

Now say that Jacques rolls his eyes and says "No, DUMMY! It's pronounced "Jack-WEEZ."

Of course, you'd make a mental note that Jacques calls himself Jack-WEEZ. But you'll probably also make a mental note that Jacques has never met anyone who speaks French, and neither have his parents.

Jack-WEEZ is a mispronunciation of Jacques.


A friend of a friend named their little girl Calliope. But they pronounce it Cali-opie. And yes, they do know the proper pronunciation, but burdened their kid anyway.
 
2020-07-03 11:40:54 PM  
Despicable.  Daffy mispronounced it so much kids kept the "wrong" pronunciation.
 
2020-07-03 11:46:44 PM  

jaylectricity: Even without the apostrophe and glottal stop it's still three syllables. I've never heard it said as two.


Me, either. The only pronunciations I've heard are

ha-vy-EE
ha-VY-ee
ha-WY-ee
 
2020-07-03 11:47:54 PM  

Marcus Aurelius: Aluminum.


Isaac Asimov wrote a whole article insisting that the American version was correct, for etymological reasons.

I was surprised, because pronunciation battles are won by usage, not by scholarship. But he thought it was worth a fight.
 
2020-07-03 11:51:26 PM  

a particular individual: naughtyrev: It takes a special kind of douche to assume that someone is pronouncing their own name wrong.

The bearer of the name absolutely has the final say. No argument.

But let's say you meet someone wearing a name tag that says "Hi! My name is Jacques."

And then let's say that you quite reasonably pronounce it the way all French speakers would: "Zhock." (That's an Americanization transliteration, but you get the point.)

Now say that Jacques rolls his eyes and says "No, DUMMY! It's pronounced "Jack-WEEZ."

Of course, you'd make a mental note that Jacques calls himself Jack-WEEZ. But you'll probably also make a mental note that Jacques has never met anyone who speaks French, and neither have his parents.

Jack-WEEZ is a mispronunciation of Jacques.


Grew up watching Jacques Cousteau docos. He was only Jacques in my limited universe, and he pronounced it 'jark'
 
433 [TotalFark] [BareFark]
2020-07-03 11:51:57 PM  
I don't want to hang out with the author.
 
2020-07-03 11:54:00 PM  
When I was a teacher a long time ago, had a quiet little island girl in one class, who's name was spelled Ekueta.

I spent whole year pronouncing it the way it was spelt. Only when her twin brothers, Longitude and Latitude, turned up the next year, that I realized her name was meant to be Equator
 
2020-07-03 11:55:46 PM  

a particular individual: jaylectricity: Even without the apostrophe and glottal stop it's still three syllables. I've never heard it said as two.

Me, either. The only pronunciations I've heard are

ha-vy-EE
ha-VY-ee
ha-WY-ee


I didn't include the V sound, but  your assessment is just like mine.
 
2020-07-03 11:59:12 PM  

lindalouwho: a particular individual: naughtyrev: It takes a special kind of douche to assume that someone is pronouncing their own name wrong.

The bearer of the name absolutely has the final say. No argument.

But let's say you meet someone wearing a name tag that says "Hi! My name is Jacques."

And then let's say that you quite reasonably pronounce it the way all French speakers would: "Zhock." (That's an Americanization transliteration, but you get the point.)

Now say that Jacques rolls his eyes and says "No, DUMMY! It's pronounced "Jack-WEEZ."

Of course, you'd make a mental note that Jacques calls himself Jack-WEEZ. But you'll probably also make a mental note that Jacques has never met anyone who speaks French, and neither have his parents.

Jack-WEEZ is a mispronunciation of Jacques.

A friend of a friend named their little girl Calliope. But they pronounce it Cali-opie. And yes, they do know the proper pronunciation, but burdened their kid anyway.


Unique.

So, you say "yoo-NIK"?
 
2020-07-04 12:01:59 AM  

lindalouwho: a particular individual: naughtyrev: It takes a special kind of douche to assume that someone is pronouncing their own name wrong.

The bearer of the name absolutely has the final say. No argument.

But let's say you meet someone wearing a name tag that says "Hi! My name is Jacques."

And then let's say that you quite reasonably pronounce it the way all French speakers would: "Zhock." (That's an Americanization transliteration, but you get the point.)

Now say that Jacques rolls his eyes and says "No, DUMMY! It's pronounced "Jack-WEEZ."

Of course, you'd make a mental note that Jacques calls himself Jack-WEEZ. But you'll probably also make a mental note that Jacques has never met anyone who speaks French, and neither have his parents.

Jack-WEEZ is a mispronunciation of Jacques.

A friend of a friend named their little girl Calliope. But they pronounce it Cali-opie. And yes, they do know the proper pronunciation, but burdened their kid anyway.


LOL.
Fark user imageView Full Size

Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-04 12:04:17 AM  
Sorry, lindalouwhoo, my Weeners was to ChubbyTiger, not you.

I don't know how I did that. Sorry.
 
2020-07-04 12:05:03 AM  
f*cking filter.
 
2020-07-04 12:10:27 AM  

ecmoRandomNumbers: Sorry, lindalouwhoo, my Weeners was to ChubbyTiger, not you.

I don't know how I did that. Sorry.


No, I'm pretty sure it was for me.
Can I have some of what you're smoking?
;)
 
2020-07-04 12:13:02 AM  
memegenerator.netView Full Size
 
2020-07-04 12:15:31 AM  
bloximages.newyork1.vip.townnews.comView Full Size


Peek-a-boo
 
2020-07-04 12:40:12 AM  
Zoology
 
2020-07-04 12:43:36 AM  
Zed, as in Zebra
 
2020-07-04 12:44:35 AM  
Is it nuclear, er, o mean nucyular? This one really started to get more traction after 9/11 went W butchered this word every chance he could.

As far as the actual word in the article karaoke is one that I have fought to the urge to correct many many times. Having studied the language in college you have to walk a fine line between pronouncing it correctly and actually trying to make time with the girls on karaoke night at the local bar. Choose your linguistic battles wisely or you will be spending the last half of your night alone in your dorm room.
 
2020-07-04 12:45:30 AM  
When I read articles like this I wonder if the author also goes off on, say, French people adopting silent "h" sounds when saying English words or if they flip their shiat when they hear Scottish or Irish people speaking. Or is their gripe just with people speaking their interpretation of "standard" English.

Words change pronunciation when they're adopted into a different language, generally merging the original with more common and easier to pronounce sounds to speakers of the adopting language. Then you add in regional accents.
 
2020-07-04 12:48:12 AM  
They just HAD to axe...


My personal peeve is dropping in an "H" where it does not belong. 

It's "school" (skool) not "Shchool". "Street", not "Shtreet". "Strong", not "Shtrong".
 
2020-07-04 12:48:40 AM  
Goddam. Did the author ever get to the word? Had to quit halfway through. I'm anti-grammer-faschist.
 
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