Skip to content
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(The Atlantic)   I was living in my parents' basement before it was cool. Now it's gone too mainstream   (theatlantic.com) divider line
    More: Awkward, Family, Adult, Young, Gen Y's Live, living room of her parents, country's young adults, large group of young people, 34-year-olds  
•       •       •

1941 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Jul 2020 at 10:32 AM (12 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



42 Comments     (+0 »)
 
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest
 
2020-07-03 9:58:11 AM  
Well maybe if wages weren't stagnant and houses and apartments weren't overpriced, we all be living on our own. But since the government refuses to do anything to help the situration (beyond giving money to the companies that caused it).
 
2020-07-03 10:13:25 AM  
For those whose parents have done better, they don't have to do this. One good friend sold his Tampa house to his daughter at a big discount and his son lives in his other old house in Virginia, paying rent/mortgage. Meanwhile, friend lives in his retirement place in Florida.

Summary: because the parents did well, the college educated, well-paid working kids get the benefit of reasonably priced housing they can actually afford.
 
2020-07-03 10:35:17 AM  

edmo: For those whose parents have done better, they don't have to do this. One good friend sold his Tampa house to his daughter at a big discount and his son lives in his other old house in Virginia, paying rent/mortgage. Meanwhile, friend lives in his retirement place in Florida.

Summary: because the parents did well, the college educated, well-paid working kids get the benefit of reasonably priced housing they can actually afford.


Reminds me of those articles "I had 120k in student loans and I paid it off in 4 years!"
They were given a house, and rented it out and moved into grandmothers house.
 
2020-07-03 10:39:09 AM  
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 10:41:49 AM  
Multi-generational houses are the norm in many societies around the globe.  They were the norm in the US until after WWII.  It was during the decades of the 1950s through the 2000s when "still lives with parents" was seen as a social ill or someone incapable of being responsible/independent.
 
2020-07-03 10:41:50 AM  
Multi generational living is the norm throughout history.  The wasteful way Americans live is the oddity.  The pendulum is swinging back.
 
2020-07-03 10:43:33 AM  
Moving in with your parents is often seen as a mark of irresponsibility. The pandemic might show the country that it shouldn't be.

I've been saying this for years, but most of the replies on fark tell me it is vitally important to kick children out and keep them out. Something about their kids being too damn stupid to learn responsibility without sink or swim tactics is the usual explanation.

Then in other threads you see the same folks complaining about landlords, housing costs, personal debt, etc. My favorite is when you then click their profile and they've got up a map of how they've traveled the globe taking international vacations every year.

Gee, I wonder where your money went...
 
2020-07-03 10:45:05 AM  
I love my parents dearly.  They're great people, I talk to them in the regular, and visit when I can (which isn't often as of late, thanks to the 'rona.

I'd rather live in a box than move back in with them.  Dad and I are both just to particular about how we want things done to coexist under one roof.
 
2020-07-03 10:45:32 AM  
Not in my parent's place but still slowly being squeezed to death by increasing rent and no raises. I tried to move this year but there's no place you can afford around here on the median salary if you have an ounce of debt, most were bought out by investors because Amazon announced their new headquarters.
 
2020-07-03 10:49:11 AM  

tjsands1118: Well maybe if wages weren't stagnant and houses and apartments weren't overpriced, we all be living on our own. But since the government refuses to do anything to help the situration (beyond giving money to the companies that caused it).


Some people have been trying to reduce immigration which increases demand for housing (raising prices) and floods the labor market (reducing wages). Other people get grouchy if you bring it up.
 
2020-07-03 10:54:27 AM  

zeroman987: Multi generational living is the norm throughout history.  The wasteful way Americans live is the oddity.  The pendulum is swinging back.



I tried living with your mom, but she's too demanding.
 
2020-07-03 11:00:58 AM  

SanityIsAFullTimeJob: tjsands1118: Well maybe if wages weren't stagnant and houses and apartments weren't overpriced, we all be living on our own. But since the government refuses to do anything to help the situration (beyond giving money to the companies that caused it).

Some people have been trying to reduce immigration which increases demand for housing (raising prices) and floods the labor market (reducing wages). Other people get grouchy if you bring it up.


LOL.

The apartment across from has 3 families of Mexicans living in it.
Why don't they have a house.
I call b.s.
And Texas has cheap housing.
250K a 3 bed.
 
2020-07-03 11:03:15 AM  
th.bing.comView Full Size

Parents don't have a basement. Moved into shed in back yard.
 
2020-07-03 11:06:39 AM  

SanityIsAFullTimeJob: tjsands1118: Well maybe if wages weren't stagnant and houses and apartments weren't overpriced, we all be living on our own. But since the government refuses to do anything to help the situration (beyond giving money to the companies that caused it).

Some people have been trying to reduce immigration which increases demand for housing (raising prices) and floods the labor market (reducing wages). Other people get grouchy if you bring it up.


Americans won't do the job.

You want lettuce, you need immigrants.

The people here are soft snowflakes.
 
2020-07-03 11:13:05 AM  
How about those greedy-ass landlords?

Oh, yes!  Let's do the right thing and CHARGE WHAT THE MARKET CAN BEAR!!

The sound of tenants complaining about rent increases...it sounds like VICTORY!!!
 
2020-07-03 11:13:53 AM  

Chief Superintendent Lookout: Multi-generational houses are the norm in many societies around the globe.  They were the norm in the US until after WWII.  It was during the decades of the 1950s through the 2000s when "still lives with parents" was seen as a social ill or someone incapable of being responsible/independent.


"Still lives with parents" was seen as a social ill, because after the rationing of WWII was over, and there was no longer a war which required a massive manufacturing industry operating 24 hours a day churning out supplies and equipment, industry did a marketing push to convince society that they needed to buy, buy, buy.

Buy a house, buy a wedding, buy a car, have 2.5 kids, and buy a dog and a cat, and buy a white picket fence and buy all the latest home improvements to "keep up with the Johnsons." Just buy and keep buying, and keep buying more. Buy a new TV! Buy a second car for the wife! Success is measured in how much you can buy! Don't have enough? Get a raise! Climb that corporate ladder! Not enough? Get a credit card! Go into debt! Debt is good! it shows you can afford to buy!

Are you still living at home? Clearly you're just lazy and don't want to do your part! Get to work you deadbeat! BUY BUY BUY!

And that sort of thing actually could work without it being that much of a burden, back when there was still enough money in the economy to keep it running. Back when the rich paid their fair share of taxes, and workers could have a career which actually provided a living wage.

But that all fell apart under Ronald Reagan. When careers became jobs, employees became "assets" and rich people fobbed their share of the tax burden off onto the working poor. And it's been getting worse ever since.
 
2020-07-03 11:16:43 AM  

bloobeary: Chief Superintendent Lookout: Multi-generational houses are the norm in many societies around the globe.  They were the norm in the US until after WWII.  It was during the decades of the 1950s through the 2000s when "still lives with parents" was seen as a social ill or someone incapable of being responsible/independent.

"Still lives with parents" was seen as a social ill, because after the rationing of WWII was over, and there was no longer a war which required a massive manufacturing industry operating 24 hours a day churning out supplies and equipment, industry did a marketing push to convince society that they needed to buy, buy, buy.

Buy a house, buy a wedding, buy a car, have 2.5 kids, and buy a dog and a cat, and buy a white picket fence and buy all the latest home improvements to "keep up with the Johnsons." Just buy and keep buying, and keep buying more. Buy a new TV! Buy a second car for the wife! Success is measured in how much you can buy! Don't have enough? Get a raise! Climb that corporate ladder! Not enough? Get a credit card! Go into debt! Debt is good! it shows you can afford to buy!

Are you still living at home? Clearly you're just lazy and don't want to do your part! Get to work you deadbeat! BUY BUY BUY!

And that sort of thing actually could work without it being that much of a burden, back when there was still enough money in the economy to keep it running. Back when the rich paid their fair share of taxes, and workers could have a career which actually provided a living wage.

But that all fell apart under Ronald Reagan. When careers became jobs, employees became "assets" and rich people fobbed their share of the tax burden off onto the working poor. And it's been getting worse ever since.


This
 
2020-07-03 11:19:01 AM  
So these "kids" don't have a job (that they want or had).  Does that mean they should just lay around
all day watching tv, spending money on an "electronic drum set", snacking, playing video games?
How about going to look for ANOTHER JOB.  I see help wanted signs all over the place.  I guess they
are too proud to take a "minimum wage" job or the like?  Who says they have to stay at that job?
Just take it to make yourself productive and useful, and give yourself some respect.  But, with unemployment
benefits if any, it's more $$ rewarding to NOT work, than to work in some cases.
 
2020-07-03 11:21:39 AM  

bloobeary: Buy a house, buy a wedding, buy a car, have 2.5 kids, and buy a dog and a cat, and buy a white picket fence and buy all the latest home improvements to "keep up with the Johnsons." Just buy and keep buying, and keep buying more. Buy a new TV! Buy a second car for the wife! Success is measured in how much you can buy! Don't have enough? Get a raise! Climb that corporate ladder! Not enough? Get a credit card! Go into debt! Debt is good! it shows you can afford to buy!


Choose Life - Trainspotting (1/12) Movie CLIP (1996) HD
Youtube Naf_WiEb9Qs


/Posted from my parents' basement (yes, really)
//December was not an ideal time to have graduated college and started looking for a career
 
2020-07-03 11:27:03 AM  

p51d007: So these "kids" don't have a job (that they want or had).  Does that mean they should just lay around
all day watching tv, spending money on an "electronic drum set", snacking, playing video games?
How about going to look for ANOTHER JOB.  I see help wanted signs all over the place.  I guess they
are too proud to take a "minimum wage" job or the like?  Who says they have to stay at that job?
Just take it to make yourself productive and useful, and give yourself some respect.  But, with unemployment
benefits if any, it's more $$ rewarding to NOT work, than to work in some cases.


What I can't get. Never get. Is, it's clear people want people to work.
Don't lie. Society wants everyone to work.
It's just short of being mandatory.
The way we treat the destitute and homeless nearly makes it a de facto law.
So, yeah kick rocks.
YOU WANT PEOPLE TO WORK? No demand that they work!
Things should reflect that.
For example. Women are kinda forced to be house wives. But, when that is the case, they get a ton of perks. Like alimony and or an inheritance.
But a worker is treated like a donkey.
Well, donkeys are stubborn.
society treats workers like donkeys and then is perplexed that they're stubborn.
Saw off buddy.
 
2020-07-03 11:31:06 AM  
Due to housing prices & an economy that's sh*tting the bed, I've resigned myself to the fact that my 20-something offspring will be living here for a while.
I know some butch-lords say I should throw them out into the streets but butch-lords are big on grandiose threats & macho posturing - you know, assholes.
 
2020-07-03 11:31:12 AM  
Yeah. I've got the opposite going on and there is nearly as much stigma attached to THAT for some farking reason.
 
2020-07-03 11:43:38 AM  

edmo: For those whose parents have done better, they don't have to do this. One good friend sold his Tampa house to his daughter at a big discount and his son lives in his other old house in Virginia, paying rent/mortgage. Meanwhile, friend lives in his retirement place in Florida.

Summary: because the parents did well, the college educated, well-paid working kids get the benefit of reasonably priced housing they can actually afford.


If your parents didn't do better for you, maybe it falls to you to do better for your kids. Or you could just complain and leave the hard work for the next generation.
 
2020-07-03 11:44:31 AM  
I'm one of those "millennials" (Oregon Trail Generation -b. 1985) that have a Non-traditional living situation. I own a home and rent out bedrooms to a woman and her dad. Someone else rents the basement, and I live in the main bedroom.

It's the new normal.
 
2020-07-03 11:48:36 AM  

p51d007: So these "kids" don't have a job (that they want or had).  Does that mean they should just lay around
all day watching tv, spending money on an "electronic drum set", snacking, playing video games?
How about going to look for ANOTHER JOB.  I see help wanted signs all over the place.  I guess they
are too proud to take a "minimum wage" job or the like?  Who says they have to stay at that job?
Just take it to make yourself productive and useful, and give yourself some respect.  But, with unemployment
benefits if any, it's more $$ rewarding to NOT work, than to work in some cases.


Not everyone should have to work. Not everyone should have to work 40 hours a week.

Most people want to be productive.  If people could support themselves without being a serf to their corporate masters, society would be better as a whole.

A lot of stuff that is low financial value but high social value would be given more emphasis.  Most people would be happier.
 
2020-07-03 11:52:39 AM  

stuffy: [th.bing.com image 475x317]
Parents don't have a basement. Moved into shed in back yard.


Mrs. Henry & daughter Henrietta just finished converting one of our out-buildings into a she-shed/art studio.
Henry Jr keeps griping that it would make a great tiny-house - for Henry Jr, of course. Mrs. Henry responds with 'STFU' using the proper F-bomb.
I'm just glad they're having this drama outside instead of the living-room for a g'damn change.
 
2020-07-03 12:02:47 PM  

zeroman987: SanityIsAFullTimeJob: tjsands1118: Well maybe if wages weren't stagnant and houses and apartments weren't overpriced, we all be living on our own. But since the government refuses to do anything to help the situration (beyond giving money to the companies that caused it).

Some people have been trying to reduce immigration which increases demand for housing (raising prices) and floods the labor market (reducing wages). Other people get grouchy if you bring it up.

Americans won't do the job.

You want lettuce, you need immigrants.

The people here are soft snowflakes.


I guess you fix that by reforming the welfare state.
 
2020-07-03 12:05:54 PM  

baronbloodbath: I'm one of those "millennials" (Oregon Trail Generation -b. 1985) that have a Non-traditional living situation. I own a home and rent out bedrooms to a woman and her dad. Someone else rents the basement, and I live in the main bedroom.

It's the new normal.


I've rented out rooms all my life. Sometimes it is nice not living alone, other times it's almost painful not getting some privacy and alone time. But after 20 years of collecting between 400 and 800 a month, that shiat adds up. That's a hundred thousand I have for retirement that I wouldn't have otherwise.

A lot of people don't want to do that, and I respect their wants and wishes, but if they choose that route they can fark right the hell off when they complain about their debt.
 
2020-07-03 12:09:52 PM  

Smackledorfer: baronbloodbath: I'm one of those "millennials" (Oregon Trail Generation -b. 1985) that have a Non-traditional living situation. I own a home and rent out bedrooms to a woman and her dad. Someone else rents the basement, and I live in the main bedroom.

It's the new normal.

I've rented out rooms all my life. Sometimes it is nice not living alone, other times it's almost painful not getting some privacy and alone time. But after 20 years of collecting between 400 and 800 a month, that shiat adds up. That's a hundred thousand I have for retirement that I wouldn't have otherwise.

A lot of people don't want to do that, and I respect their wants and wishes, but if they choose that route they can fark right the hell off when they complain about their debt.


I'm barely making a profit with my situation because taxes in NJ are ~$850 per month on a $250k house. It's insane.

At least I'm building equity for now and I've got money put aside for repairs and whatnot.
 
2020-07-03 12:21:05 PM  
My oldest just turned 18.  He is going to be living "at home" for a while.  No job hunting or moving out during a pandemic.

That said, I have told all my kids that if they want to leave home, explore the world, go to college or trade school, get a job, move out, etc, I won't stop them.  Explore life.  If they soar, I will cheer them on.  If they crash and burn, they will always have a home here.

As an aside, my son also lives in his own camper on property and both my daughters want to "move out" in their own campers when they turn 16.  Good kids with good heads on their shoulders and my sarcasm.  But they still have to do their chores.

I realize our set up and situation is not the same as everyone else, but the "18 and 30" I've heard people talk about (not here) never made sense to me.  30 days to move out or start paying rent now that you are 18?  I don't get it.  It makes even less sense during a global health crisis.
 
2020-07-03 1:03:14 PM  
I have a feeling I'm about to be laid off for the second time in two years (first time was a newspaper, this time government). I've been talking to my 401(k) folks a lot about cashing it out if it comes to that. I would pay a hefty penalty plus taxes, but at least I have that going for me. Been trying to activate my newspaper pension, I can't get anyone with the company or Vanguard to answer how the hell do I do that (I'm 56, so I understand it would be less if I didn't wait). Don't want to be eating cat food.
 
2020-07-03 1:06:33 PM  

KimHoppes: My oldest just turned 18.  He is going to be living "at home" for a while.  No job hunting or moving out during a pandemic.

That said, I have told all my kids that if they want to leave home, explore the world, go to college or trade school, get a job, move out, etc, I won't stop them.  Explore life.  If they soar, I will cheer them on.  If they crash and burn, they will always have a home here.

As an aside, my son also lives in his own camper on property and both my daughters want to "move out" in their own campers when they turn 16.  Good kids with good heads on their shoulders and my sarcasm.  But they still have to do their chores.

I realize our set up and situation is not the same as everyone else, but the "18 and 30" I've heard people talk about (not here) never made sense to me.  30 days to move out or start paying rent now that you are 18?  I don't get it.  It makes even less sense during a global health crisis.


It's odd to have a 30 years old kid.
🤔

I'm okay with it.

And in middle school I loved my mom not being all gray
 
2020-07-03 1:12:59 PM  
Old geezer in my mid-50s here. I'm sympathetic. The situation is so much different today that I can't even compare when I moved out at age 19 (Mom helped by throwing a suitcase on my bed) and could find a couple of roommates to split a house and get by on our low paying jobs.

Today? Sheesh! Sky high rents, massive unemployment, constant fear of a deadly pandemic...

It's a good thing we a president who can relate to this!

/s
 
2020-07-03 2:04:43 PM  

Keys dude: I have a feeling I'm about to be laid off for the second time in two years (first time was a newspaper, this time government). I've been talking to my 401(k) folks a lot about cashing it out if it comes to that. I would pay a hefty penalty plus taxes, but at least I have that going for me. Been trying to activate my newspaper pension, I can't get anyone with the company or Vanguard to answer how the hell do I do that (I'm 56, so I understand it would be less if I didn't wait). Don't want to be eating cat food.


I seem to remember reading that the "penalty" for early withdrawal has been suspended during the Covid 19 pandemic.  It's worth looking into.
 
2020-07-03 2:11:25 PM  
I wanted to read this with an open mind and feel for the "kids" dilemmas, I really did.  But then the article started talking about the 30 year old that was looking forward to moving back in and having a dish washer and washer / drier.  That was cringe inducing.

Then there was the 22 year old who moved back in and decided he wanted to learn how to play the drums......so he got a drum set even through he acknowledged it's loud and disturbs people.  What an asshole.

Then I got to Chrissy cooking stuff at midnight and read this sentence: ""The sentiment was like, 'You're our kid in our house; these are our rules,' and it, to me, was like, 'Well, I'm not a kid, and I didn't really ask to be in your house right now.'"  Wow.  Little entitled biatch.

That was the end of the reading, couldn't take any more.  fark the lot of them.
 
2020-07-03 3:04:15 PM  
Armyrec1 img.fark.net    
Smartest (0)   Funniest (0)
''56 minutes ago

Keys dude: I have a feeling I'm about to be laid off for the second time in two years (first time was a newspaper, this time government). I've been talking to my 401(k) folks a lot about cashing it out if it comes to that. I would pay a hefty penalty plus taxes, but at least I have that going for me. Been trying to activate my newspaper pension, I can't get anyone with the company or Vanguard to answer how the hell do I do that (I'm 56, so I understand it would be less if I didn't wait). Don't want to be eating cat food.

I seem to remember reading that the "penalty" for early withdrawal has been suspended during the Covid 19 pandemic.  It's worth looking into.


Vanguard, in my long phone call, never mentioned any suspension.
 
2020-07-03 3:09:51 PM  

edmo: For those whose parents have done better, they don't have to do this. One good friend sold his Tampa house to his daughter at a big discount and his son lives in his other old house in Virginia, paying rent/mortgage. Meanwhile, friend lives in his retirement place in Florida.

Summary: because the parents did well, the college educated, well-paid working kids get the benefit of reasonably priced housing they can actually afford.


Go 'Murica?
 
2020-07-03 3:12:56 PM  

zeroman987: Multi generational living is the norm throughout history.  The wasteful way Americans live is the oddity.  The pendulum is swinging back.


We were also one of the few countries with the land and the wealth to do it.  Maybe there will be a significant shift that lasts.  Our entire economy needs to be rebooted.
 
2020-07-03 8:33:35 PM  

ComaToast: Old geezer in my mid-50s here. I'm sympathetic. The situation is so much different today that I can't even compare when I moved out at age 19 (Mom helped by throwing a suitcase on my bed) and could find a couple of roommates to split a house and get by on our low paying jobs.

Today? Sheesh! Sky high rents, massive unemployment, constant fear of a deadly pandemic...

It's a good thing we a president who can relate to this!

/s


Same here, mid fifties, bought a house in my twenties. Single guy, got a mortgage on my salary alone and got a fairly nice house in a nice area. If I was in the same job today and starting from scratch I'd have no chance.
 
2020-07-03 10:22:37 PM  

SanityIsAFullTimeJob: tjsands1118: Well maybe if wages weren't stagnant and houses and apartments weren't overpriced, we all be living on our own. But since the government refuses to do anything to help the situration (beyond giving money to the companies that caused it).

Some people have been trying to reduce immigration which increases demand for housing (raising prices) and floods the labor market (reducing wages). Other people get grouchy if you bring it up.


Yeah, no. It's not the big bad immigrant boogieman coming to take your affordable shanties. It's the whole mostly building luxury accommodations, which leads to fiscal segregation. Rich people take over every desirable area, forcing the established working class and poor population out.

The other thing is we have a lot of houses and land to develop, but both are far out of price range for many Americans. And to think immigrants are responsible for it all is laughable. If anything their cheap labor has probably help lower the cost a little.

It's actually funny to blame immigrants for anything in large. Cities with higher illegals rate have less violent crimes. We blame them for wage depression, but if the goverment arrested the CEO/bosses and shut down the businesses that hired illegals instead of round the workers up for deportation the whole illegal thing would be fix as it would actually be hard for them to find work. See right now illegal are prefect workers, no regulations to follow as they have no recourse, if they act up the boss can deport them. It's slavery 3.0, and y'all are convince it's slaves fault for following the myth that America was the land of opportunity.

So, since it's a post BLM world. Shut it up your farking ass you racist son of a biatch, we aren't groucy that you bring it up, we're annoyed that uncle daddy and aunty mommy passed on just enough braincells for your inbred ass to use the internet, now shut the fark up and you back to 1850 ypu antiquated twat.
 
2020-07-04 1:35:41 AM  

kryptoknightmare: [Fark user image image 425x349]


Way ahead of you there buddie :-) Well truthfully I did move out for a little while when I was with the ex-wife. Health issues were a large contributing factor in my moving back after the divorce...
 
2020-07-04 1:44:42 PM  

Armyrec1: Keys dude: I have a feeling I'm about to be laid off for the second time in two years (first time was a newspaper, this time government). I've been talking to my 401(k) folks a lot about cashing it out if it comes to that. I would pay a hefty penalty plus taxes, but at least I have that going for me. Been trying to activate my newspaper pension, I can't get anyone with the company or Vanguard to answer how the hell do I do that (I'm 56, so I understand it would be less if I didn't wait). Don't want to be eating cat food.

I seem to remember reading that the "penalty" for early withdrawal has been suspended during the Covid 19 pandemic.  It's worth looking into.


Penalty, maybe, but you'll still pay the taxes on it, which is a large chunk of the value but will vary by state and tax bracket.
 
Displayed 42 of 42 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

This thread is closed to new comments.

Continue Farking




On Twitter



  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.