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(Twitter)   The English language is officially dead   (twitter.com) divider line
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8308 clicks; posted to Main » on 03 Jul 2020 at 2:05 AM (16 weeks ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook



Voting Results (Smartest)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

 
2020-07-02 11:35:08 PM  
67 votes:
It's spelled whoa. I'll never accept woah.

DO YOU HEAR ME?! NEVER!
 
2020-07-02 11:27:41 PM  
57 votes:
Written language died when teenagers got smart phones.

My lawn. Off it.
 
2020-07-02 11:23:38 PM  
42 votes:
external-preview.redd.itView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 2:13:35 AM  
26 votes:
The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.
 
2020-07-03 2:11:04 AM  
22 votes:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 1:50:54 AM  
21 votes:

Dewey Fidalgo: Mæg ic be me sylfum
soðgied wrecan
siþas secgan,
hu ic geswincdagumed
earfoðhwile
oft þrowade
abitre breostceare
gebiden hæbbe,
gecunnad in ceole


English died in 1066.
 
2020-07-03 2:12:10 AM  
16 votes:
I was so sure this was going be a Trump tweet.
 
2020-07-03 12:19:06 AM  
15 votes:
Mæg ic be me sylfum
soðgied wrecan
siþas secgan,
hu ic geswincdagumed
earfoðhwile
oft þrowade
abitre breostceare
gebiden hæbbe,
gecunnad in ceole
 
2020-07-02 11:33:02 PM  
14 votes:

ecmoRandomNumbers: Written language died when teenagers got smart phones.

My lawn. Off it.


Nah, it died with T9
 
2020-07-03 12:47:59 AM  
10 votes:
The verbing of nouns.
 
2020-07-03 2:36:12 AM  
9 votes:
Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.
 
2020-07-03 2:21:53 AM  
8 votes:
Can someone please show me the words tree where the words grow naturally and we harvest them to add to the dictionary so they are now officially words?

Words meanings get changed over time.

Words get created all the time irregardless of what you think.

Did you know you Shakespeare personally brought 500 words into the lexicon?  We add words here and there randomly after they have become used so often that they become words, but 1 guy, in his lifetime, brought 500 words into the lexicon.

Critics of this would hate him.  He brought "swagger", "lonely", "hint", and "critic" into the language just by using them in his plays.
 
2020-07-02 11:38:25 PM  
8 votes:
In other news I learned what LMMO is today.

Laughing My Mask Off

Sigh
 
2020-07-03 2:15:56 AM  
7 votes:

abhorrent1: Irregardless is a perfectly cromulent word to use when conversating.


Sure...  if you want to be beaten upside the head.
 
2020-07-03 2:12:32 AM  
7 votes:
Only according to Merriam-Webster's, the Dane Cook of English Dictionaries.
 
2020-07-03 2:10:25 AM  
7 votes:

L33t Squirrel: So how do we blame this one on Millennials?


A lack of valid reasons never kept boomers from blaming millennials before. Why stop now?
 
2020-07-02 11:31:30 PM  
7 votes:
It died with Donald Trump, sitting on its head.

I can't breathe. Literalism, see.
 
2020-07-03 10:31:28 AM  
6 votes:
Irregardless is a perfectly good word.  It means: "This idiot means regardless"   See?  Now you know the person speaking is an idiot and no further listening is required.
 
2020-07-03 3:35:37 AM  
6 votes:
i.imgflip.comView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 2:37:02 AM  
6 votes:

aerojockey: I can't think of a single time I've ever heard someone say "irregardless" non-ironically.


As I said, why add another syllable if you don't have to?  It's like "orientate", which I also hate with the fire of a thousand suns.
 
2020-07-03 2:08:02 AM  
6 votes:
So how do we blame this one on Millennials?
 
2020-07-03 3:11:25 AM  
5 votes:

dkulprit: Can someone please show me the words tree where the words grow naturally and we harvest them to add to the dictionary so they are now officially words?

Words meanings get changed over time.

Words get created all the time irregardless of what you think.

Did you know you Shakespeare personally brought 500 words into the lexicon?  We add words here and there randomly after they have become used so often that they become words, but 1 guy, in his lifetime, brought 500 words into the lexicon.

Critics of this would hate him.  He brought "swagger", "lonely", "hint", and "critic" into the language just by using them in his plays.


I don't think the problem is so much with new words, the problem is stupidly used words. "Irregardless" is unnecessary because it means the same as "regardless", which not only preceded it, but is shorter thus more efficient. Whereas adding the prefix just shows ignorance of language and its roots.
 
2020-07-03 3:05:33 AM  
5 votes:
Decimate. Reduce by 10%.
 
2020-07-03 2:44:06 AM  
5 votes:
Most human languages were developed by illiterates.  English was a group project by three sets of illiterates (Celts, Angles/Saxons/Jutes, Vikings/Danes/Norwegians) and semiliterate Normans.  Then the educated people had a go at it -- Samuel Johnson declaring that the gates of English are open and to keep it pure would be folly, "to lash the wind".

Then the Anglophones on one side of the pond decided to conquer most of their hemisphere and the Anglophones on the other decided to invite or force people of every nation to come over to our side of the pond and talked with them.

So English is an unwieldy, unstable, illogical mess.  That's why it has become a lingua franca.
 
2020-07-03 2:38:00 AM  
5 votes:
C is for Contrafibularity | Blackadder The Third | BBC Comedy Greats
Youtube hOSYiT2iG08
 
2020-07-03 12:59:26 AM  
5 votes:

Dewey Fidalgo: Mæg ic be me sylfum
soðgied wrecan
siþas secgan,
hu ic geswincdagumed
earfoðhwile
oft þrowade
abitre breostceare
gebiden hæbbe,
gecunnad in ceole


Beowulf? My senior English teacher made us memorize portions of Beowulf in Old English. I have no idea why. She was a total asshole. To me, it was Greek being spoken by sadistic Germans.

But I repeat myself.
 
2020-07-02 11:41:34 PM  
5 votes:
Irregardless is a perfectly cromulent word to use when conversating.
 
2020-07-03 3:42:21 AM  
4 votes:
What needs to be understood is the English language is "The Borg". It is! It assimilates and changes to the whims and tastes of the era. Kindergarten is a German word but we English speakers know what it is. Mayonnaise? I can't even spell it right w/o spellcheckers and it's as American as Mayonnaise Pie ( seriously I failed twice -- I don't eat it much ). This absurd language gobbles up anything that fits, sounds cool or makes you laugh at the drop of a hat. I think English is the best language there is because it's a bit of every language.

/ We Are The Borg!
 
2020-07-03 2:41:04 AM  
4 votes:
M-W has been including nonstandard words, labeled as "nonstandard," for many years now.
 
2020-07-03 2:37:02 AM  
4 votes:
If we can have flammable and inflammable we can have regardless and irregardless.
 
2020-07-03 10:58:44 AM  
3 votes:

cman: The word "smart" originally meant "pain".


It is still used for "hurt".

"Ouch, that smarts."
"That's got to smart."
 
2020-07-03 7:02:51 AM  
3 votes:
How many people spell the wore lose as loose. Two completely different words and meanings. If I see that again I'll loose my mind.
 
2020-07-03 5:23:43 AM  
3 votes:
"Weird Al" Yankovic - Word Crimes
Youtube 8Gv0H-vPoDc
 
2020-07-03 4:46:00 AM  
3 votes:

waxbeans: I've never understood that rule


Parentheses and periods can be tricky to navigate (but not impossible).

It's about intuitive sentence rhythm, and knowing when something in parentheses should be self-contained and exist on its own.  (Some people might scoff at this, but it's true.)
 
2020-07-03 4:30:29 AM  
3 votes:

studebaker hoch: The verbing of nouns.


Verbing weirds language.
 
2020-07-03 4:13:17 AM  
3 votes:

Abacus9: waxbeans: cman: cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.

Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?

Oh my God I didn't know about this but I'm loving it it further goes to show that, some, teachers are some dumbf$$ks.
but to be fair it's not them it's their syllabuses that they obey and those syllabuses are made by the school board which is a bunch of people who just happen to have money.

The Romans named those months back when the year started in March. In those days, September WAS the seventh month. Etc.


Nice. Thanks for knowledge.
 
2020-07-03 4:11:13 AM  
3 votes:

waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Wait.
We can fix decimate.

C-19 may very well decimate the United States of America.

33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

Serious about the way Soviet troops were treated. Not so much about the rest.

I'm getting it.
And, if people don't practice social distancing and wearing of masks and all that other jazz,
C-19 may very well randomly kill one in ten Americans.
AKA decimate us like a Russian officer.

More or less. Not Russian though. Soviet. Different ish entities.

My bad. Yeah.

Also, (self reminder)
USSR fell.


Kinda. Putin is leader for life now apparently. Separate subject. I'll drop it.
 
2020-07-03 3:37:38 AM  
3 votes:

cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.


Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?
 
2020-07-03 3:10:46 AM  
3 votes:
Not how it works. When a word gets added to an English dictionary, it's because the writers of that dictionary stopped being stubborn about it. And as backward as the word is considering what it's constructed from, when everyone who uses a word is wrong about what it means, you're actually wrong and they're right. That's how the language do.
 
2020-07-03 3:08:29 AM  
3 votes:

waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This


Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.
 
2020-07-03 2:45:13 AM  
3 votes:
Yeah, its a living language. Suck it
 
2020-07-03 2:17:39 AM  
3 votes:
I remember a few years back hearing two women talking in a coffee shop behind me and when she said "Yes, but irregardless irregardless..." I felt a sudden...stabbiness come over me.

And here, my goddamn Chrome spellchecker underlined stabbiness and not irregardless.
 
2020-07-03 2:17:23 AM  
3 votes:

HawgWild: It's spelled whoa. I'll never accept woah.

DO YOU HEAR ME?! NEVER!


woah is a horse command.
 
2020-07-03 2:09:06 AM  
3 votes:

L33t Squirrel: So how do we blame this one on Millennials?


Just say it.
 
2020-07-03 2:07:56 AM  
3 votes:
I can't think of a single time I've ever heard someone say "irregardless" non-ironically.
 
2020-07-03 3:16:43 PM  
2 votes:
"nonplussed" is supposed to mean "surprised of shocked" or roughly that.   However, so many people used it in completely the wrong way.  They used it as meaning not surprised or not shocked.

Anyways, some dictionaries are actually accepting the misuse as a valid definition variant.  That's not right.
 
2020-07-03 11:06:58 AM  
2 votes:
If they're going to accept irregardless, they should also accept the new term:
"moronify: v. 1) To make moronic. 2) To normalize moronic behavior. See also: dumb down."

Language is used to convey information and emotion. "Regardless" is very clear. Adding "ir", a negation prefix (ir-regular, ir-relevant), does what - intensify? Negate?

Changing language to make information-conveyal clearer, to represent new concepts and constructions, is an improvement. Adding it to normalize an error is moronification.
 
2020-07-03 4:27:01 AM  
2 votes:

aerojockey: I can't think of a single time I've ever heard someone say "irregardless" non-ironically.


LOL I was conducting a very high level meeting with two major corporations the guy who was an Exec VP from HP - who reported to Carly Forina  - used the word 6 times.  We all held our breath, emotions and disdain very professionally.  When we broke from the meeting we all just laughed our asses off...... The guy was a tool.  End of the day........Look what happened to HP.  My Company - Cisco, was good to go (At the time)......
 
2020-07-03 4:25:27 AM  
2 votes:

Abacus9: How the fark would I know, I was just correcting someone else's misspelling (again, to screw over hypocrites, not because I care about this shiat.)


Technically, that last period should be placed outside your closing parentheses.
 
2020-07-03 4:18:17 AM  
2 votes:

cman: Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?


The names did correspond to their months before the Romans added January and February to the start of the year in order to fix their then shambolic calendar.
 
2020-07-03 4:17:30 AM  
2 votes:

baron von doodle: CrazyCurt: What needs to be understood is the English language is "The Borg". It is! It assimilates and changes to the whims and tastes of the era. Kindergarten is a German word but we English speakers know what it is. Mayonnaise? I can't even spell it right w/o spellcheckers and it's as American as Mayonnaise Pie ( seriously I failed twice -- I don't eat it much ). This absurd language gobbles up anything that fits, sounds cool or makes you laugh at the drop of a hat. I think English is the best language there is because it's a bit of every language.

/ We Are The Borg!

Well, yes, American English does the same thing to other languages that we do to food. We steal it, Americanize it and generally ruin the original intention.


So you're saying we eat it, turn it to shiat, and shiat it for others? Yes. And that's fine. Languages change. English is probably the worst offender, but it's such a rich language for it (because it's a thief). But it's a good thief because it doesn't take away from the other languages.
 
2020-07-03 4:11:52 AM  
2 votes:

waxbeans: cman: cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.

Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?

Oh my God I didn't know about this but I'm loving it it further goes to show that, some, teachers are some dumbf$$ks.
but to be fair it's not them it's their syllabuses that they obey and those syllabuses are made by the school board which is a bunch of people who just happen to have money.


The Romans named those months back when the year started in March. In those days, September WAS the seventh month. Etc.
 
2020-07-03 4:07:30 AM  
2 votes:

pkjun: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

The word's been in use to mean "destroyed a lot of" since the 1660s. Probably best to just let that one go.

/The word "Chair" goes back a bit farther but originally meant "throne" or "pulpit"
//It all changes


It dates to the Roman empire. Try again.
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decim​a​tion_(Roman_army)
 
2020-07-03 4:03:06 AM  
2 votes:

baron von doodle: Don't care about being consistent. Decimate hacks me off because they mean destroy or other synonyms. It originated in laziness and infected the language.


It's meant "destroy, or damage to the point of crippling" for longer than modern English has existed, what the fark are you on about?

The root of the word refers to a somewhat-apocryphal punitive measure of executing one man in ten of a group of rebels by lot, but no one has ever literally meant that.  The thing you're complaining about "changing" is very much the original and only meaning the word's ever had.

This is like getting upset that when someone is called "draconian" they're not literally using a specific set of ancient Mesopotamian laws, or that when you buy fifteen head of cattle you get fifteen entire cattle with legs and torsos included.  You're not even being an actual conservative about the language here, you're being a "conservative" in the sense that US politicians self-identify as 'conservative', where they make up some random bullshiat that never actually happened even once and declare it was totally always tradition.

Decimate never meant elimination of one in ten.  Not once, not ever.  Give it up.

// Chances are that, since the practice was kinda apocryphal, it never even meant literally destroy one in ten in Latin, either.
 
2020-07-03 3:47:54 AM  
2 votes:

CrazyCurt: What needs to be understood is the English language is "The Borg". It is! It assimilates and changes to the whims and tastes of the era. Kindergarten is a German word but we English speakers know what it is. Mayonnaise? I can't even spell it right w/o spellcheckers and it's as American as Mayonnaise Pie ( seriously I failed twice -- I don't eat it much ). This absurd language gobbles up anything that fits, sounds cool or makes you laugh at the drop of a hat. I think English is the best language there is because it's a bit of every language.

/ We Are The Borg!


Well, yes, American English does the same thing to other languages that we do to food. We steal it, Americanize it and generally ruin the original intention.
 
2020-07-03 3:44:02 AM  
2 votes:

waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Wait.
We can fix decimate.

C-19 may very well decimate the United States of America.


33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

Serious about the way Soviet troops were treated. Not so much about the rest.
 
2020-07-03 3:36:23 AM  
2 votes:

cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.


Don't care about being consistent. Decimate hacks me off because they mean destroy or other synonyms. It originated in laziness and infected the language.
 
2020-07-03 3:31:12 AM  
2 votes:

waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?


I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.
 
2020-07-03 3:15:25 AM  
2 votes:

Abacus9: dkulprit: Can someone please show me the words tree where the words grow naturally and we harvest them to add to the dictionary so they are now officially words?

Words meanings get changed over time.

Words get created all the time irregardless of what you think.

Did you know you Shakespeare personally brought 500 words into the lexicon?  We add words here and there randomly after they have become used so often that they become words, but 1 guy, in his lifetime, brought 500 words into the lexicon.

Critics of this would hate him.  He brought "swagger", "lonely", "hint", and "critic" into the language just by using them in his plays.

I don't think the problem is so much with new words, the problem is stupidly used words. "Irregardless" is unnecessary because it means the same as "regardless", which not only preceded it, but is shorter thus more efficient. Whereas adding the prefix just shows ignorance of language and its roots.


You're completely missing the point.
Usage is the authority here not how you feel.
 
2020-07-03 3:11:22 AM  
2 votes:
Oblig

The European Commission has just announced an agreement whereby English will be the official language of the EU rather than German which was the other possibility.
As part of the negotiations, Her Majesty's Government conceded that English spelling had some room for improvement and has accepted a five year phase-in plan that would be known as "Euro-English".
In the first year, "s" will replace the soft "c". Sertainly, this will make the sivil servants jump with joy. The hard "c" will be dropped in favour of the "k". This should klear up konfusion and keyboards kan have 1 less letter.
There will be growing publik enthusiasm in the sekond year, when the troublesome "ph" will be replaced with "f". This will make words like "fotograf" 20% shorter.
In the 3rd year, publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be ekspekted to reach the stage where more komplikated changes are possible. Governments will enkorage the removal of double letters, which have always ben a deterent to akurate speling. Also, al wil agre that the horible mes of the silent "e"s in the language is disgraseful, and they should go away.
By the fourth year, peopl wil be reseptiv to steps such as replasing "th" with "z" and "w" with "v". During ze fifz year, ze unesesary "o" kan be dropd from vords kontaining "ou" and similar changes vud of kors be aplid to ozer kombinations of leters.
After zis fifz yer, ve vil hav a reli sensibl riten styl. Zer vil be no mor trubl or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi to understand ech ozer. Ze drem vil finali kum tru! And zen world!

Guten Tag.
 
2020-07-03 2:59:50 AM  
2 votes:

anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.


The American English dictionary DEFINATELY does not make the rules.
I'll wait until the Oxford English dictionary weighs in.
 
2020-07-03 2:52:00 AM  
2 votes:

studebaker hoch: The verbing of nouns.


The adverbing of adjectives.

/drive safe
//think different
///twitch
 
2020-07-03 2:29:14 AM  
2 votes:

Spartapuss: Hoisted on it's own petard.


its!

I've personally never heard anyone use the word 'irregardless' when speaking.  In print, the only time I've come across it is in written diatribes bemoaning the collapse of civilization as we know it....usually written by people who are trying very hard to justify those liberal arts degrees.   I honestly think we're ok here.

Clichéd idioms bother me a lot more than mutated single words.  I could live the rest of my life pretty comfortably if I never heard "at the end of the day" again.  You probably all have your own favourites as well.
 
2020-07-03 2:26:46 AM  
2 votes:
Clearly, too many of you haven't read

Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation
by Ammon Shea

And it shows
 
2020-07-03 2:22:51 AM  
2 votes:
The feels when hamberder covfefe yeets your MAGA.
 
2020-07-03 2:20:04 AM  
2 votes:
When humans were first making words for things, sometimes things or concepts would get discovered that needed new words. So someone would make up a new word for something and everyone eventually agreed upon using it.

Apparently, some people feel we shouldn't do that anymore? Language policing is very odd...
 
2020-07-03 2:07:44 AM  
2 votes:
Hoisted on it's own petard.
 
2020-07-03 12:24:21 AM  
2 votes:
I could care less (yes, that was intentional) what others feel about English

I speak American, so fark y'all.
 
2020-07-03 3:10:44 PM  
1 vote:

ecmoRandomNumbers: Dewey Fidalgo: Mæg ic be me sylfum
soðgied wrecan
siþas secgan,
hu ic geswincdagumed
earfoðhwile
oft þrowade
abitre breostceare
gebiden hæbbe,
gecunnad in ceole

Beowulf? My senior English teacher made us memorize portions of Beowulf in Old English. I have no idea why. She was a total asshole. To me, it was Greek being spoken by sadistic Germans.

But I repeat myself.


The Seafarer.   I love the kenning "whale-road" from the poem, meaning the sea.  Also, from Beowulf, the sea is called the swan-road.  I think that's Beowulf.
 
2020-07-03 11:08:30 AM  
1 vote:

JungleBoogie: If they're going to accept irregardless, they should also accept the new term:
"moronify: v. 1) To make moronic. 2) To normalize moronic behavior. See also: dumb down."

Language is used to convey information and emotion. "Regardless" is very clear. Adding "ir", a negation prefix (ir-regular, ir-relevant), does what - intensify? Negate?

Changing language to make information-conveyal clearer, to represent new concepts and constructions, is an improvement. Adding it to normalize an error is moronification.


Epic.
 
2020-07-03 10:54:42 AM  
1 vote:

Abacus9: psychosis_inducing: in flagrante: Spartapuss: Hoisted on it's own petard.

its!

I've personally never heard anyone use the word 'irregardless' when speaking.  In print, the only time I've come across it is in written diatribes bemoaning the collapse of civilization as we know it....usually written by people who are trying very hard to justify those liberal arts degrees.   I honestly think we're ok here.

Clichéd idioms bother me a lot more than mutated single words.  I could live the rest of my life pretty comfortably if I never heard "at the end of the day" again.  You probably all have your own favourites as well.

I noticed that unless someone is discussing something that happens round twilight time, you can remove "at the end of the day" without losing any meaning at all. You also rarely need to add any placeholder words for grammatical correctness. "At the end of the day" lifts cleanly out.

Incorrect. Much of it comes from religion, in the form of Jewish people ending their day at sunset. Like it or not, that has ingrained itself into American culture via the Christian religion, which is somewhat related. Phrases like "don't let the sun set upon your anger" are examples of this. Maybe educate yourself before speaking next time.


Spoken like someone who hasn't paid attention in a meeting or a class lecture in a long time.

"At the end of the day, we need someone to volunteer to type all these notes so we can file them."
"Yeah, I would love to try your idea but at the end of the day, you have to get it approved first."
"People love to try to save money, but at the end of the day you must consider quality versus price."
"You can try shortcuts to avoid solving this system of equations, but at the end of the day you're going to need to do the math in order to move on to the next step."
"I know housecleaning sucks, but at the end of the day we need to do it or else we will live in filth."
"You may think you smell fine, but at the end of the day if you don't shower before work people will notice."

"At the end of the day, we need someone to volunteer to type all these notes so we can file them."
"Yeah, I would love to try your idea but at the end of the day, you have to get it approved first."
"People love to try to save money, but at the end of the day you must consider quality versus price."
"You can try shortcuts to avoid solving this system of equations, but at the end of the day you're going to need to do the math in order to move on to the next step."
"I know housecleaning sucks, but at the end of the day we need to do it or else we will live in filth."
"You may think you smell fine, but at the end of the day if you don't shower before work people will notice."

Don't worry, you're still very smart. Someday you might learn how phrases sometimes lose their meaning over time and become meaningless filler.
 
2020-07-03 10:06:29 AM  
1 vote:
English died the first time somebody said pre-programmed and nobody killed him.

/ you can't farking post-program, asshole.
 
2020-07-03 9:55:55 AM  
1 vote:

waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Resident Muslim: studebaker hoch: The verbing of nouns.

Sorry, I was mouthing your words, and they floored me.
I'm just helping you in painting the larger picture.

/I have enough issues with people blending words; mansplaining, moobs, etc
//though brunch has become mainstream
///don't brunch myself, though

I never really, really, understood what mansplaining was/is?

But,
The movie I Love You, Daddy

Was/is on YouTube.
And there this sense where CK is explaining something to his daughter. And a massive light bulb was going off. And, I was OMFG this scumbag is mansplaining.

Serious question, have you ever been north of the Mason/Dixon line? Curious, you said you're from Texas, I'm from Michigan, and we couldn't live in more different worlds. Just seeing what the common ground is, you know?

Oh my God I love Auburn hills I want to die in Auburn hills Detroit.

Ok wait what? Auburn Hills isn't in Detroit, and why?

When I went to see Metallica, at the palace in Auburn hills, I loved the hell out of it. The leaves; and the combination of the sun and cold combined to be thid feeling that I described as air conditioning outdoors.
I want to spend my last days there. Oh and Windsor is an amazing cherry on top.

When was this? I saw them there on 12/31/1999 along with Ted Nugent, and (was too late to see Kid Rock or Sevendust - and good! cuz they suck - Kid Rock sux anyway, don't know about the other). It may explain the sun with the outdoor air conditioning (Winter, we call it here). Any why were you in SE Michigan anyway?

OCTOBER 1, 2004, God Smack. Opened.
Always wanted, still want to, fallow Metallica across America. Only managed 3 shows over 14 months.

When I hear winter I think uncomfortable cold.
Not air conditioning, with a warm beam of sun on my face. Did a elk/mousse hunt in Colorado during winter. That was uncomfortable. And not air conditioning. That was cold.


You can always dress warmer. My air conditioner broke in my apartment in 2010 and the thermostat said it was over 120 degrees (that was the far end of the needle, so it could have been hotter), and I'm not sure the damn thing was calibrated properly in the first place, and it was old. But I felt like I was dying, took a quick cold shower every half hour, and drank lots of beer to keep myself cool. Of course, the fridge busted, so I had to then freeze it.
 
2020-07-03 9:37:35 AM  
1 vote:

Dewey Fidalgo: Mæg ic be me sylfum
soðgied wrecan
siþas secgan,
hu ic geswincdagumed
earfoðhwile
oft þrowade
abitre breostceare
gebiden hæbbe,
gecunnad in ceole


I can about myself a true story reckon.
Something about a journey of hardship and suffering and sorrow ... in a "keel" (which I assume is a poetic way to say, 'ship' )

'
 
2020-07-03 9:11:10 AM  
1 vote:

waxbeans: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Resident Muslim: studebaker hoch: The verbing of nouns.

Sorry, I was mouthing your words, and they floored me.
I'm just helping you in painting the larger picture.

/I have enough issues with people blending words; mansplaining, moobs, etc
//though brunch has become mainstream
///don't brunch myself, though

I never really, really, understood what mansplaining was/is?

But,
The movie I Love You, Daddy

Was/is on YouTube.
And there this sense where CK is explaining something to his daughter. And a massive light bulb was going off. And, I was OMFG this scumbag is mansplaining.

Serious question, have you ever been north of the Mason/Dixon line? Curious, you said you're from Texas, I'm from Michigan, and we couldn't live in more different worlds. Just seeing what the common ground is, you know?

Oh my God I love Auburn hills I want to die in Auburn hills Detroit.

Ok wait what? Auburn Hills isn't in Detroit, and why?

When I went to see Metallica, at the palace in Auburn hills, I loved the hell out of it. The leaves; and the combination of the sun and cold combined to be thid feeling that I described as air conditioning outdoors.
I want to spend my last days there. Oh and Windsor is an amazing cherry on top.

THIS*****


Yeah Windsor's a bit of all right, eh?
 
2020-07-03 8:29:39 AM  
1 vote:

in flagrante: Spartapuss: Hoisted on it's own petard.

its!

I've personally never heard anyone use the word 'irregardless' when speaking.  In print, the only time I've come across it is in written diatribes bemoaning the collapse of civilization as we know it....usually written by people who are trying very hard to justify those liberal arts degrees.   I honestly think we're ok here.

Clichéd idioms bother me a lot more than mutated single words.  I could live the rest of my life pretty comfortably if I never heard "at the end of the day" again.  You probably all have your own favourites as well.


I noticed that unless someone is discussing something that happens round twilight time, you can remove "at the end of the day" without losing any meaning at all. You also rarely need to add any placeholder words for grammatical correctness. "At the end of the day" lifts cleanly out.
 
2020-07-03 8:01:18 AM  
1 vote:

HawgWild: It's spelled whoa. I'll never accept woah.

DO YOU HEAR ME?! NEVER!


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 7:58:33 AM  
1 vote:

cman: I could care less (yes, that was intentional) what others feel about English

I speak American, so fark y'all.


🎶 That means you do care
(At least a little)🎶
 
2020-07-03 7:37:14 AM  
1 vote:

ecmoRandomNumbers: Written language died when teenagers got smart phones.

My lawn. Off it.


My English teacher back in 1976 would disagree with that.
 
2020-07-03 7:30:10 AM  
1 vote:
Dead languages don't change.
 
2020-07-03 6:43:16 AM  
1 vote:

CFitzDE: A language misuse that bothers me is 'peruse' -- I've heard many people use it to mean 'skim' or 'look over lightly' when the dictionary defines it as 'to examine carefully at length.'

The 'literally' problem is alarming to me because we've already lost 'really' in the same way. I don't want to have to say "that wasn't a metaphor" after we lose the battle of 'literally' (that may or may not have been a metaphor).


That bothers me as well. How can you literally say literally if it can literally mean figuratively?
 
2020-07-03 6:40:49 AM  
1 vote:
A language misuse that bothers me is 'peruse' -- I've heard many people use it to mean 'skim' or 'look over lightly' when the dictionary defines it as 'to examine carefully at length.'

The 'literally' problem is alarming to me because we've already lost 'really' in the same way. I don't want to have to say "that wasn't a metaphor" after we lose the battle of 'literally' (that may or may not have been a metaphor).
 
2020-07-03 6:13:24 AM  
1 vote:

cman: I could care less (yes, that was intentional) what others feel about English

I speak American, so fark y'all.


Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 5:22:20 AM  
1 vote:

Mitt Romneys Tax Return: i ignore u: Well yeah, for all intensive porpoises.

[i.ytimg.com image 480x360]

Chomping at the bit


That'll do your teeth in.
 
2020-07-03 4:49:27 AM  
1 vote:

waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.

Qua? Ain't is racist?

I'm talking about when I was in school in 1979.

Fat, white, (and sometimes old)  ladies was very insistent that ain't wasn't a word they got God darn ambivalent about it.
I'm convinced it was racism.

That would have been around Kindergarten, right? They also probably told you that your tongue had only four taste receptors, located on different parts of your tongue. Have you not figured out by now that it was all a lie?

I've been getting that feeling for at least 20 years.

About this and many other things.
the interesting thing is people are still holding on to those lies and being insistent about them.


Thank Xenu for Fark then! Farkers will correct any misconception, even if it's true! (I'm not really a Scientologist). Seriously though, I have learned quite a few things here over the years. Fark is smarter than your average site.
 
2020-07-03 4:38:09 AM  
1 vote:

waxbeans: in flagrante: Abacus9: How the fark would I know, I was just correcting someone else's misspelling (again, to screw over hypocrites, not because I care about this shiat.)

Technically, that last period should be placed outside your closing parentheses.

I've never understood that rule to me everything that belongs inside the (belongs inside the) because it's inside the prison seas


For some reason text to voice added those ()()()


Damn you. I was going to bed. What is the proper punctuation after an emoji or emoticon?
Hi 😁
Hi :D
 
2020-07-03 4:31:36 AM  
1 vote:

Gordon Bennett: cman: Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?

The names did correspond to their months before the Romans added January and February to the start of the year in order to fix their then shambolic calendar.


Wait a minute that means they should have renamed all the months then that would have made more sense
 
2020-07-03 4:30:25 AM  
1 vote:

pkjun: discussing how it is used in English, and it has been used in English with its current popular meaning for four and a half centuries. Get over it.


Nope.

I'm pretty certain c-19 will determine the United States if Americans don't wear mask and social distance.
 
2020-07-03 4:27:34 AM  
1 vote:

Abacus9: waxbeans: cman: cman: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.

Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.

Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?

Oh my God I didn't know about this but I'm loving it it further goes to show that, some, teachers are some dumbf$$ks.
but to be fair it's not them it's their syllabuses that they obey and those syllabuses are made by the school board which is a bunch of people who just happen to have money.

The Romans named those months back when the year started in March. In those days, September WAS the seventh month. Etc.


Oh my God I love numbers
And the superstitions around them

So my birthday is all 7s.
😁😁😁😁
 
2020-07-03 4:26:53 AM  
1 vote:

Abacus9: baron von doodle: CrazyCurt: What needs to be understood is the English language is "The Borg". It is! It assimilates and changes to the whims and tastes of the era. Kindergarten is a German word but we English speakers know what it is. Mayonnaise? I can't even spell it right w/o spellcheckers and it's as American as Mayonnaise Pie ( seriously I failed twice -- I don't eat it much ). This absurd language gobbles up anything that fits, sounds cool or makes you laugh at the drop of a hat. I think English is the best language there is because it's a bit of every language.

/ We Are The Borg!

Well, yes, American English does the same thing to other languages that we do to food. We steal it, Americanize it and generally ruin the original intention.

So you're saying we eat it, turn it to shiat, and shiat it for others? Yes. And that's fine. Languages change. English is probably the worst offender, but it's such a rich language for it (because it's a thief). But it's a good thief because it doesn't take away from the other languages.


I didn't mean turn it to shiat. Umm. Homoginazition is a better term. The world has tons of great cheeses. We have American cheese slices and Velveeta.
 
2020-07-03 4:25:58 AM  
1 vote:

baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Wait.
We can fix decimate.

C-19 may very well decimate the United States of America.

33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

Serious about the way Soviet troops were treated. Not so much about the rest.

I'm getting it.
And, if people don't practice social distancing and wearing of masks and all that other jazz,
C-19 may very well randomly kill one in ten Americans.
AKA decimate us like a Russian officer.

More or less. Not Russian though. Soviet. Different ish entities.

My bad. Yeah.

Also, (self reminder)
USSR fell.

Kinda. Putin is leader for life now apparently. Separate subject. I'll drop it.


Oh wow


So we should use

Pre/ post perestroika
And
Pre/ post Nazi invasion
 
2020-07-03 4:23:42 AM  
1 vote:

Gordon Bennett: cman: Addendum

September - "septem" meaning seventh month

October - octo - eight month

November - novem - ninth month

December - decim - tenth month

No one gets upset about how they represent months that dont correspond to their names. So why do some get their panties in a bunch over decimate?

The names did correspond to their months before the Romans added January and February to the start of the year in order to fix their then shambolic calendar.


Yes and decimate once meant to reduce by a tenth

Over time things changed which is why those months no longer correspond to their namesake and that decimate now is synonymous with "to destroy".
 
2020-07-03 4:22:47 AM  
1 vote:

Abacus9: Also had a hit with "Relish".


Oh my gosh so that means I can say I relish the hell out of relish
 
2020-07-03 4:19:14 AM  
1 vote:

Jim_Callahan: baron von doodle: Don't care about being consistent. Decimate hacks me off because they mean destroy or other synonyms. It originated in laziness and infected the language.

It's meant "destroy, or damage to the point of crippling" for longer than modern English has existed, what the fark are you on about?

The root of the word refers to a somewhat-apocryphal punitive measure of executing one man in ten of a group of rebels by lot, but no one has ever literally meant that.  The thing you're complaining about "changing" is very much the original and only meaning the word's ever had.

This is like getting upset that when someone is called "draconian" they're not literally using a specific set of ancient Mesopotamian laws, or that when you buy fifteen head of cattle you get fifteen entire cattle with legs and torsos included.  You're not even being an actual conservative about the language here, you're being a "conservative" in the sense that US politicians self-identify as 'conservative', where they make up some random bullshiat that never actually happened even once and declare it was totally always tradition.

Decimate never meant elimination of one in ten.  Not once, not ever.  Give it up.

// Chances are that, since the practice was kinda apocryphal, it never even meant literally destroy one in ten in Latin, either.


the fun thing is if we use it in the manner of one in ten and it catches on then that will be its meeting because  usage is King
 
2020-07-03 4:07:48 AM  
1 vote:

Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.


Ain't is a very old word and historically used to be a proper contraction.
 
2020-07-03 4:05:55 AM  
1 vote:

waxbeans: 33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

Serious about the way Soviet troops were treated. Not so much about the rest.

I'm getting it.
And, if people don't practice social distancing and wearing of masks and all that other jazz,
C-19 may very well randomly kill one in ten Americans.
AKA decimate us like a Russian officer.


A claim regarding the behaviour of "Officers in the Soviet Union" during "WW1" is odd to see from someone also claiming to be very concerned about historical accuracy.
 
2020-07-03 4:02:44 AM  
1 vote:

baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: It's become a Smoresabortion.

Good word but I would put an h before bortion.

Smoreshbortion?

Yes. Sounds funnier that way. If you are making up a word, why not make it funny?


😁
 
2020-07-03 4:02:03 AM  
1 vote:

baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.


The word's been in use to mean "destroyed a lot of" since the 1660s. Probably best to just let that one go.

/The word "Chair" goes back a bit farther but originally meant "throne" or "pulpit"
//It all changes
 
2020-07-03 3:57:33 AM  
1 vote:

Abacus9: I don't personally care, just pointing out the hypocrisy


There's a difference between full blown hypocrisy and just typing rapidly at 4am.

You got me.  Enjoy your laurels.  :)
 
2020-07-03 3:57:21 AM  
1 vote:

waxbeans: baron von doodle: Wait.
We can fix decimate.

C-19 may very well decimate the United States of America.

33 mil? Good God I hope not. By the way, decimate is historically important. The officers in the Soviet Union circa WW1 and 2 would shoot 1 in 10 soldiers at random from any unit that deserted. So, keeping that word accurate is historically important. Nya 😝

Serious about the way Soviet troops were treated. Not so much about the rest.

I'm getting it.
And, if people don't practice social distancing and wearing of masks and all that other jazz,
C-19 may very well randomly kill one in ten Americans.
AKA decimate us like a Russian officer.


More or less. Not Russian though. Soviet. Different ish entities.
 
2020-07-03 3:53:38 AM  
1 vote:
 
2020-07-03 3:49:50 AM  
1 vote:

waxbeans: baron von doodle: It's become a Smoresabortion.

Good word but I would put an h before bortion.

Smoreshbortion?


Yes. Sounds funnier that way. If you are making up a word, why not make it funny?
 
2020-07-03 3:45:27 AM  
1 vote:

waxbeans: baron von doodle: waxbeans: Abacus9: waxbeans: Snapper Carr: Language evolves as its speakers change.  The word "irregardless" becomes common parlance, linguists are going to take note - eventually it ends up in the dictionary.

This is how language works.

Latin is dead.  It is unchanging.  No one speaks it outside of jargon from a handful of academic fields.

Exactly.

/
To all the teachers who say ain't isn't a word,
You should say yet.
U cu*nts.

Well, who used to.

"Ain't" is a word, and it's in the dictionary, too. None of my English teachers ever said otherwise.

I'm 46.
When I was in school the teachers were 60 years old.
At least to my eyes.
I'm sure that one English teacher was 30 or 40.
But yeah, I'm still thinking about when I was in school.
Grade school.
1979.

Fact of the matter is it was racism.

Qua? Ain't is racist?

I'm talking about when I was in school in 1979.

Fat, white, (and sometimes old)  ladies was very insistent that ain't wasn't a word they got God darn ambivalent about it.
I'm convinced it was racism.


Ah, sorry. I'm 39 btw.
 
2020-07-03 3:42:33 AM  
1 vote:

Abacus9: I could be wrong, but shouldn't that be "if I'd never heard", because it's subjunctive?


Using the modal auxiliary verb "could" to modify "live" at the beginning of the sentence should be enough for a reader to follow me on my imagined scenario, without strict grammatical agreement in the conditional clause.  Debatable I guess.

If we're being Nazis, I'd probably have to concede.
 
2020-07-03 3:42:33 AM  
1 vote:
Irregardless is a stupid, unnecessary word, but it's in widespread enough use and doesn't directly contradict any rules of how words are constructed enough to be a "real" word.

Actually I always kind of assumed it was the original word since it has an archaic prefix, like with inflammable and flammable (inflammable was the original word but it sort of incidentally works out that flammable conveys the same meaning by accident).  Looking it up it seems like it comes from blending irrespective and regardless in the mid-20th century, so probably it's listed as an irregular usage/slang term at this point?  e.g. "ain't" and "y'all".
 
2020-07-03 3:38:03 AM  
1 vote:

waxbeans: Abacus9: Yamaneko2: Most human languages were developed by illiterates.  English was a group project by three sets of illiterates (Celts, Angles/Saxons/Jutes, Vikings/Danes/Norwegians) and semiliterate Normans.  Then the educated people had a go at it -- Samuel Johnson declaring that the gates of English are open and to keep it pure would be folly, "to lash the wind".

Then the Anglophones on one side of the pond decided to conquer most of their hemisphere and the Anglophones on the other decided to invite or force people of every nation to come over to our side of the pond and talked with them.

So English is an unwieldy, unstable, illogical mess.  That's why it has become a lingua franca.

Excellent.

Nnnnnnn

It's become a Smoresabortion.


Good word but I would put an h before bortion.
 
2020-07-03 3:32:46 AM  
1 vote:

baron von doodle: waxbeans: baron von doodle: Mitt Romneys Tax Return: waxbeans: anfrind: The English dictionary does not make the rules, it merely describes how the language is used.  If you would rather use a language where the rules are defined by a central authority, you can switch to French.

This

Not entirely. Editors of English language dictionaries spend a great deal of time determining the proper balance between description (identifying and defining words as they are used) and proscription (setting the rules for proper definitions and usage). You're right that there is no central language authority like the French Academy, but you can't have a functional language if the lexicon is a complete free-for-all.

You are correct, but I think that they are taking "common usage" too far. I mean, words have to have meanings or what I just typed is only inteligible to myself. A chair should always be a chair.

No.
Usage determines meaning.
What exactly about that are you incapable of understanding?

I'm still pissed off about the news media fracking up the meaning of decimate. Personal grudge. Beyond that, I don't really care.


Do you care that December is used as the 12th month and not the 10th?

If your gonna get upset about decimate you might as well be consistent.
 
2020-07-03 3:27:02 AM  
1 vote:

baron von doodle: Nullav: Not how it works. When a word gets added to an English dictionary, it's because the writers of that dictionary stopped being stubborn about it. And as backward as the word is considering what it's constructed from, when everyone who uses a word is wrong about what it means, you're actually wrong and they're right. That's how the language do.

Fine. Then what do we use for Scrabble?


An argument that can convince at least two other players. Coincidentally, this is the only known mechanism for officially adding words to the language.
 
2020-07-03 3:25:13 AM  
1 vote:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 3:24:01 AM  
1 vote:

in flagrante: Spartapuss: Hoisted on it's own petard.

its!

I've personally never heard anyone use the word 'irregardless' when speaking.  In print, the only time I've come across it is in written diatribes bemoaning the collapse of civilization as we know it....usually written by people who are trying very hard to justify those liberal arts degrees.   I honestly think we're ok here.

Clichéd idioms bother me a lot more than mutated single words.  I could live the rest of my life pretty comfortably if I never heard "at the end of the day" again.  You probably all have your own favourites as well.


I could be wrong, but shouldn't that be "if I'd never heard", because it's subjunctive?
 
2020-07-03 3:10:09 AM  
1 vote:
I amn't hungry anymore. I already et.
 
2020-07-03 3:05:45 AM  
1 vote:

Begoggle: People are overexaggerating.


In German 'exaggerate' is 'übertrieben' which is like saying 'over propel' or 'over drive'.
 
2020-07-03 2:53:14 AM  
1 vote:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 2:45:34 AM  
1 vote:
It's fine, languages evolve constantly. It's just a matter of time until "scroteblast" is being used daily. America needs this word, frankly.
 
2020-07-03 2:31:22 AM  
1 vote:

dkulprit: Can someone please show me the words tree where the words grow naturally and we harvest them to add to the dictionary so they are now officially words?

Words meanings get changed over time.

Words get created all the time irregardless of what you think.

Did you know you Shakespeare personally brought 500 words into the lexicon?  We add words here and there randomly after they have become used so often that they become words, but 1 guy, in his lifetime, brought 500 words into the lexicon.

Critics of this would hate him.  He brought "swagger", "lonely", "hint", and "critic" into the language just by using them in his plays.


Incarnadine is my favorite.
 
2020-07-03 2:29:30 AM  
1 vote:
Fark user imageView Full Size
 
2020-07-03 2:24:18 AM  
1 vote:
People don't think it be like it is, but it do.
 
2020-07-03 2:21:21 AM  
1 vote:
People are overexaggerating.
 
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